Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Grafting fig scion to moderately active rootstock in cold temperature

Collapse
X
Collapse
  •  

  • Grafting fig scion to moderately active rootstock in cold temperature

    Fig Grafting guidelines complements of HarveyC:

    1. Graft with dormant scions and rootstock with moderate growth rate (high growth may result in heavy sap flow the interferes with cambium contact)


    2. I almost always make partial circular cuts/scores around rootstock an inch or two below the planned grafting location to relieve pressure of sap flow. If I see almost no sap flow when I cut off the top of rootstock, I may skip this step.

    3. If scion and rootstock are about the same diameter, use a whip and tongue graft. If scion is slightly smaller than rootstock, just make cut in rootstock so that width between two sides of cambium are the same as the scion.

    4. If scion is maybe 3/4 or less than the diameter of the rootstock, use cleft graft. I using cleft graft I prefer scion to not be more than 1/2 the diameter of the rootstock (less splitting of rootsotck), so consider going lower on rootstock to get thicker area.

    5. Conserve scionwood for expensive or precious varieties, using only 1 or 2 buds is fine.

    6. I prefer wrapping scion with Parafilm prior to placing the scion so that I'm not moving it around after it's already in place. Stretch the Parafilm a lot when placing over scion (and union area also, but less important) as this creates a better seal and makes it easier for buds to push through.

    7. I know some people put Parafilm on over union before placing rubber band but I always place rubber band on first and then cover union area with Parafilm. This results in less chance of scion moving and the Parafilm can also help keep the rubber band held in place a little bit better.

    8. Ask Hershell for further advice, he is a pro!

    I've bought various gadgets for grafting and yesterday did more grafting and resorted to my old Tina grafting knife, my favorite. I have 3 of them so I always have one that is very sharp. My eyesight is getting more difficult even with glasses (reflections, etc.) and I often use a magnifying lens (I have one that is worn as a hood on my head) to help align cambium layers.

    Practice a lot with cheap stuff!

    Additional considerations:


    Note that in Mallorca Montserrat Pons is shown in one video planting trees in very large wholes perhaps 5' in diameter and 5' deep. The hole is gradually filled in as the tree grows. The purpose being to have a very deep root system allowing the trees to be sustained without irrigation.

    It has also been mentioned that the advantages of grafting might be lost if the plant could die back to a point below the graft and it would be lost.

    I suggested that in cold climates that, "the grafted fig tree should be planted in a deep hole so that the graft union is perhaps only 2' below soil surface." I believed that the more vigorous rootstock would continue to provide the primary source of nutrients needed for the tree.

    Bass commented that the advantage of the rootstock would still be lost since the fig scion would root into the soil. He later recanted and agreed with me.

    However, the sion characteristic could be lost if the grafted top would root below the soil surface. If the grafted top would root into the soil it would likely be more vigorous.

    HarveyC is a contributing, senior member and the proprietor of www.figaholics.com, providing hundreds of varieties of fig cuttings or rooted trees.

    To get a first hand glimpse of grafting of
    Black Madeira onto a potted Brown Turkey:
    https://www.facebook.com/Figaholics/...62955093764904

    Thank You for your time.

    Note that in Mallorca Montserrat Pons is shown in one video planting trees in very large wholes perhaps 5' in diameter and 5' deep. The hole is gradually filled in as the tree grows. The purpose being to have a very deep root system allowing the trees to be sustained without irrigation.

    It has also been mentioned that the advantages of grafting might be lost if the plant could die back to a point below the graft and it would be lost.

    I (HarveyC) suggested that in cold climates that, "the grafted fig tree should be planted in a deep hole so that the graft union is perhaps only 2' below soil surface." I believed that the more vigorous rootstock would continue to provide the primary source of nutrients needed for the tree.

    Bass commented that the advantage of the rootstock would still be lost since the fig scion would root into the soil. He later recanted and agreed with me.

    However, the sion characteristic could be lost if the grafted top would root below the soil surface. If the grafted top would root into the soil it would likely be more vigorous.

    HarveyC is a contributing, senior member and the proprietor of www.figaholics.com, providing hundreds of varieties of fig cuttings or rooted trees.

    To get a first hand glimpse of grafting of
    Black Madeira onto a potted Brown Turkey:
    https://www.facebook.com/Figaholics/...62955093764904

    Thank You for your time.
      Posting comments is disabled.

    Categories

    Collapse

    Article Tags

    Collapse

    Latest Articles

    Collapse

    • Productive Container Grown Fig Trees; What? and How!
      by AscPete
      What quantity do you consider productive for a small fig tree in a 5 gallon pot?
      What quantity do you consider productive for a fig tree in a 10, 15, 20, 30 or 55 gallon pot?
      Which common fig cultivars in your opinion grows too aggressively to remain in 5 gallon pots?

      These questions were answered in public discussions with members of the fig forums (6). The compiled answers combined with trialing the Japanese Commercial Fig Farming Prescriptive methods have led to my conclusion...
      05-20-2017, 02:36 PM
    • The Five (5) Fig Flavor Groups
      by AscPete
      How do you explain the flavor of a fresh fig to someone that has never tasted one?
      You compare it to something that they may have already tasted. That's why I've started discussions on fig flavor in "Fig Flavor Groups" (1) and "Gateway Fig Cultivars" (2), although these topics are very subjective and personal they can be approached objectively to improve and enhance the fig growing experience. Without a reference point for the actual fig flavors most growers rely on recommendations...
      09-30-2016, 05:25 PM
    • Fig Tree Nutrition
      by AscPete
      Adequate fertilization of potted fig trees will reward you with more edible produce at the end of the fruiting season. Providing the fig trees with proper readily available nutrition will almost guarantee healthy productive growth. Feeding schedules are used by gardening hobbyists and commercial farmers, making a feed schedule for cuttings through mature trees will not only document what you feed your trees but will be helpful with diagnosing problems that occur and provide you with a reference...
      08-06-2016, 02:42 PM
    • Rooting Fig Cuttings: An Overview
      by AscPete
      Rooting Fig Cuttings: Methodology... The How's and Why's

      There are several methods for rooting fig cuttings with an almost unlimited amount of variations practiced by each Hobbyist / Grower, the successful methods all have solutions for reducing or eliminating fungal, bacterial and insect infestation, creating a healthy ambient environment for root initialization / growth while providing water, fertilization and light for healthy vegetative growth.

      Propagating fig cuttings,...
      03-08-2016, 12:16 PM
    • Grafting Photos complements of Andreas-Patars
      by Admin IT
      03-05-2016, 12:24 PM
    • Grafting fig scion to moderately active rootstock in cold temperature
      by Admin IT
      Fig Grafting guidelines complements of HarveyC:

      1. Graft with dormant scions and rootstock with moderate growth rate (high growth may result in heavy sap flow the interferes with cambium contact)


      2. I almost always make partial circular cuts/scores around rootstock an inch or two below the planned grafting location to relieve pressure of sap flow. If I see almost no sap flow when I cut off the top of rootstock, I may skip this step.

      3. If scion and rootstock...
      03-05-2016, 01:50 AM
    Working...
    X