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  • #26
    Is there anyone out there still sending out scion wood for The Duke? I'm happy to pay the shipping when the scions are ready (or pick them up if they are near Sacramento). I'm hoping to get a tree started for my wife to enjoy home grown avocados. Thanks for considering.

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    • Bluemalibu
      Bluemalibu commented
      Editing a comment
      I do volunteer work down in Sacramento every Friday. Let me know when you have an avocado rootstock ready to graft onto, and I can bring some scion down for you.

  • #27
    Blue what rootstock do you recommend?

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    • Bluemalibu
      Bluemalibu commented
      Editing a comment
      Brian, Duke rootstocks were the gold standard for a long time. A Duke cross, called Duke 7, or Martin Grande are now used... both are great for resisting root rot.

  • #28
    Hello Bluemalibu and Ken: If we graft Duke (or any other that we want to use as rootstock) on available seedling, and then bury the graft junction -- would that encourage rooting on the scion as well? If so, this could be a possible route to generate rootstocks. Thank you
    Buffalo Bayou Farms, SE gulf coast (zone: 9B). WL: Azores Dark, CdD Noir, Golden Rainbow, Hative d’Argenteuil, Iranian candy, Fig Preto, LSU Scott Black, Socoro Black, Sweet George

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    • TucsonKen
      TucsonKen commented
      Editing a comment
      I'm giving this my best guess; others may have better answers. I only bury the graft union on an avocado when I've grafted to a recently-sprouted seedling and the union is very close to the seed. I wouldn't try it on a more mature plant, or if the graft union was higher on the stem. My purpose for grafting so low to give an extra measure of freeze protection by keeping the (probably less cold-hardy) rootstock away from potential freezes, with the added hope that if the grafted variety freezes to the ground, it may resprout from above the graft.

      I've heard a couple of objections to this method. First is the general notion that it's harmful to plant any tree too deep, but I figure that on a tree so young, it's no different than if I had planted the seed a few inches deeper. No root flare has developed yet, so I doubt that it's detrimental. The second objection is that the grafted variety will grow roots above the union and increase its susceptibility to root rot or other problems that a good rootstock might be able to resist. This makes sense to me, but I still go ahead and take the risk, because in my experience, avocados are such reluctant rooters that I doubt roots will form in that inch or two above the union. But, I could certainly be wrong.

  • #29
    Image from https://brokawnursery.com/about/
    Seeing this image, I thought step 3 is to bury the graft junction in some kind of rooting media to create clonal rootstock. I could be totally wrong about this step though..
    Buffalo Bayou Farms, SE gulf coast (zone: 9B). WL: Azores Dark, CdD Noir, Golden Rainbow, Hative d’Argenteuil, Iranian candy, Fig Preto, LSU Scott Black, Socoro Black, Sweet George

    Comment


    • TucsonKen
      TucsonKen commented
      Editing a comment
      Interesting! It seems a bit complicated, but makes good sense. I'm guessing they "force" roots to grow from the clonal rootstock by removing a band of bark, as in an air layer, and probably using rooting hormone as well?

    • KMH
      KMH commented
      Editing a comment
      Yes they are basically air layering the clonal graft, the graft on top of that and eventually either sever the original or leave it be.
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