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  • Anyone know much about mushrooms?

    I found this mushroom growing in my yard the other day, and took a few pics because it's really pretty. I finally got around to researching it, and it looks like it's a Tremella fuciformis, an edible (and I guess prized) mushroom. Now, I'm scheduled to have most of the plants that this is growing around removed on Thursday 6/14....my questions are two: 1) does anyone know of a good way for me to clearly identify this 'shroom, and 2) if I want to save it and resituate it after the trees that need removal are gone, how would I go about caring for it during transition? And I suppose a third question....if it is indeed T. fuciformis, how do I prepare it (in the future, when there's more)? There are about 3 growths I've seen, all about 5" in diameter.

    Thanks!
    Attached Files
    Titusville, FL- zone 9b

  • #2
    I also saw this stuff on one of my oak log and have no clue what it is.
    Naeem
    Maryland Ellicott City Zone 7A

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    • #3
      Paul Stamets has written several books on mushrooms and is a guru in the field. Lot's of material on the interenet under mushroom farming or mycology.

      I would save some of the soil in the area where they are growing. If they are growing on an old log,etc save that too. That area has already been innoculated with spores. Each mushroom variety has a preferred growing media and conditions.

      Unfortunately an allergy to mushrooms has kept me from exploring this area Including transplanting. Good luck.
      Johnson1
      Zone 9b
      S of Tampa Bay, FL

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      • Jkanyok
        Jkanyok commented
        Editing a comment
        I would absolutely hate to be allergic to mushrooms....but I will 100% take your advice and gather some of the soil. The log unfortunately was thrown out when the area was cleared today. So sad!

    • #4
      I pick edible mushrooms, don't know that one. Maybe see if you have any spot with very similar conditions in every way. But I've found that if the specific natural habitat isn't supporting that spore then it may be hard to transplant successfully I only mess with chanterelle and oyster. In South Louisiana, Chanterelles just started in the past 2 weeks and will continue through the entire summer until temps drop then oysters start after the chanterelles stop and will continue through most of the winter. Very delicious. I posted pics here last year of a haul of chanterelle mushrooms. These things are very picky about their habitat and are not easily manipulated from my experience.

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      • #5
        That looks like a slime mold to me.

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        • Jkanyok
          Jkanyok commented
          Editing a comment
          I still don't really know what it is, but I hope it's not a slime mold, lol!

        • fig Lebowski
          fig Lebowski commented
          Editing a comment
          Look up white coral slim mold. I don’t know if that’s it exactly, but I believe it’s in the same family

      • #6
        I'm not familiar with the species, but from a quick search I would agree with T. fuciformis as a probable ID.
        You might convince it to grow just by tossing the mushrooms around in places that seem like good spots for them, but that's no gaurantee.
        The mushroom you see above ground is only the fruit. The functioning body of the mushroom is growing inside the tree or the ground.
        A bit like if a apple tree grew underground, and just the apples themselves popped out above ground. You can pick the mushroom, but its only the fruit of a much larger organism.
        The fruit of the mushroom, like the apple, contains the seeds (spores) to reproduce itself. But getting a mushroom to grow is even more demanding than getting a seed to sprout.
        Here is a link that describes the use of T. fuciformis and some directions for growing them.

        http://botit.botany.wisc.edu/toms_fungi/jan2006.html
        Ryan
        Northeast Texas, 8a

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        • Jkanyok
          Jkanyok commented
          Editing a comment
          That's awesome and good news as the log it was growing on got tossed out, but the soil and leaf litter around it was saved.

      • #7
        If looks like snow fugus that my mom cook to me when I was kid, it was dry yellow form, My mom hydrated it and cook it with vegetables. Sometime, She made sweet "Dessert soup" using it as well. She said that it is good for health.

        I may be wrong, Most of this type of fugus and mushroom are good to reduce risk of cancer, I live near Vancouver, BC, I find Reishi muchroom growing on dead wood at few places, I have seen many friends and families died by cancer, and This is suppose to be good natural cancer fighter, Just do not know how to eat them.
        Last edited by Rickyv101; 06-14-2018, 07:58 AM.
        Wtb: Barbillone, IMP Celeste, LSU SC Yellow, High production breba varieties

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        • Jkanyok
          Jkanyok commented
          Editing a comment
          That describes exactly how T. fuciformis is used. I do hope I can get it to grow from the soil and pieces of vegetation I was able to save.

      • #8
        Since you are in FL, perhaps

        Les Harrison http://blogs.ifas.ufl.edu/wakullaco/...0/mushrooms-3/

        or Jack Twachtman http://ediblenortheastflorida.edible...fun-and-profit

        could give you reliable advice.

        Or you could contact your local Florida Cooperative Extension Office for research based information on growing mushrooms: http://sfyl.ifas.ufl.edu/find-your-local-office/
        Christine (Waddell, AZ Zone 9b) Wishlist: All my fig wishes have been fulfilled by OurFigs members. Thank you!

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        • Jkanyok
          Jkanyok commented
          Editing a comment
          Excellent idea, thank you!

        • Ortegojeffrey
          Ortegojeffrey commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks for posting that, Christine.
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