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  • Cold hardy citrus orange frost

    I'm in Austin TX for business and visited a nursery that has a cold hardy citrus ,ORANGE FROST,satsuma that A&M says tasted great few seeds and can grow ok in ground Z7.In NC I had OWARI satsuma that fruited but died of cold.I'll take one of these new ones back to try.Has anyone here any experience with this ORANGE FROST satsuma? I'll cover it first few years then it's on its own. Back in NC.I do have some lemon hybrids there I bred that fruit great and survive cold but last winters 3F prevented any fruit this summer but trees are fine,But I want a sweet citrus I can eat out of hand and this new one sounds interesting.
    Z8A NC SANDHILLS

    WISH LIST :CC, ZAFFIRO, CAMPANIERE

  • #2
    Nice find. I am also in NC. is the orange frost tree grafted or rooted?

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    • YATAMA
      YATAMA commented
      Editing a comment
      supposedly rooted

  • #3
    Yatama - interested in any trades for cuttings from those lemons?

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    • #4
      Thats possible but one would need to root them and I neverrooted citrus cuttings. Lemons are about 2.5 inch diameter,tree is 12 feet tall takes several years for trees to get big enough to make lemons. I get about 100 every autumn. one can bud lemons but need rootstock.
      Z8A NC SANDHILLS

      WISH LIST :CC, ZAFFIRO, CAMPANIERE

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      • #5
        I grow the citrus frost and arctic frost. They are very sweet and tart kinda like Tang soda. If I could find more I would buy them up. It’s my favorite citrus.
        Hydroponics, fruit trees, experimental gardening, figs, peaches in East Texas zone 8

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        • CliffH
          CliffH commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks for the comments. I have seen that variety around here a lot in the last couple of years. But did not buy one. If I put in another citrus, I will definitely consider one of these now.

          Unfortunately, due to a couple of cold snaps the last two winters we've had no citrus crop in our backyard for three years. Despite wrapping all the trees in frost blankets.

      • #6
        It’s going to die this winter if you plant it outside.

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        • #7
          I planted one outside and it died the first year. I bring the others into the greenhouse now for the last 2 years. I may try to plant one of the bigger trees outdoors this year. Yes you can root this variety. I have a friend next door who planted his in ground and it’s huge now at year 3. It’s hard to beat in ground.
          Hydroponics, fruit trees, experimental gardening, figs, peaches in East Texas zone 8

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          • YATAMA
            YATAMA commented
            Editing a comment
            theres a small nursery in east Texas near the LA border who has had orange frost and other hardy citrus called Talbott his webste says talbott and poultry. I once mail ordered muscadine vines from him and they were good. not sure what he has now prices were good

        • #8
          Briteleaf.com is a citrus nursery in central Fl. Many specialty varieties and I think they also are a large grower of common varieties for groves. Worth giving them a call with your question.

          I am presently growing kaffir lime and yuzu sour orange.
          Johnson1
          Zone 9b
          S of Tampa Bay, FL

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          • #9
            The Bloomsweet grapefruit is supposed to be cold hardy and comes from Japan. I purchsed my few trees from mckenzie-farms.com and the guy who runs it likes to focus on growing cold hardy citrus in ground in South Carolina. His trees were in really great shape when they came to me and it was a great deal for the price I paid. He doesn't have too many cold hardy ones this year because of how bad the winter was but he may have some hardy varieties left and a few random non-hardy ones in his greenhouse.

            I've also read Owari satsuma's are not as cold hardy as they're claimed to be. I can't remember which ones but there the other satsumas are supposed to be more resistant than the Owari. There's alot of studies and information done on the satsumas and their differences so you can try looking for the information. I'll edit and put some links in if I find them
            Last edited by fettuccine; 08-08-2018, 12:07 PM. Reason: Just remembered something about the Owari
            Nyc zone 7b Wish List: Bourjasette Grise, Capelas, Cavaliere, Genovese Nero AF, Sweetheart

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            • #10
              Well I doubt any citrus at all can survive outdoors in NY. The nursery here in TXalso has bloomsweet grapefruit that does OK in S Texas.I got one from McKenzie in SC but it could not survive in southern NC Z8a.At present am not going to try any other citrus than this Orange Frost one.And have enough of my cold hardy lemon trees to satisfy me.Mainly figs are my current focus.
              Z8A NC SANDHILLS

              WISH LIST :CC, ZAFFIRO, CAMPANIERE

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              • fettuccine
                fettuccine commented
                Editing a comment
                Lol they definitely wouldn't be able to survive the NY winters. Not edible ones at least. I've actually found some poncirus trifoliata's growing in my neighborhood and used as a hedge mixed in with other common hedge plants! So maybe it's possible if its a trifoliate hybrid but I wouldn't try it if I'm not guaranteed a pleasantly edible fruit.

            • #11
              Yatama, any updates on that ORANGE FROST satsuma? I was thinking of trying that one in a sheltered location.
              Eric Los Lunas NM, Zone 7

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              • #12
                I have nothing new to say. No dea where you arelocated in terms of winter minimum temps but it is supposed to survive 10F but I would think not sustained maybe for few hours some night, but would suppose can take lot of 20F weather.The great nursery at Round Rock TX just N f Austin had a bunch of these last summer in 5 gallon pots with green fruits on them and looked healthy for about 50 bucks I would have one here if could get it! But impossible
                Z8A NC SANDHILLS

                WISH LIST :CC, ZAFFIRO, CAMPANIERE

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                • #13
                  One of the guys on a citrus forum I am on has a commercial citrus orchard in Wilmington NC. I think he exclusively grown Satsuma. He showed pics a few years back and it was quite impressive. No disease and very little pest issues.

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                  • #14
                    Satsuma is really only cold hardy to around 16 by Texas am. I have two large 30 gallon trees that I put in ground and then put in garage during winter. If you plant the seeds they will produce very close to the parents fruit quality.

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                    • #15
                      I’ve had a hard time rooting the cuttings. 10% success rate. This year I found some citrus frost at Bob Wells nursery in Lindale grafted to trifoliate. Next year I will graft cuttings to trifoliate. The original orange/citrus frost that were on their own rootstock are now impossible to find. The grafted versions seem to be more vigorous and taller.
                      Hydroponics, fruit trees, experimental gardening, figs, peaches in East Texas zone 8

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                      • #16
                        good info thamks
                        Z8A NC SANDHILLS

                        WISH LIST :CC, ZAFFIRO, CAMPANIERE

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                        • #17
                          Keep in mind that for those of us in marginal citrus regions every degree of cold hardiness matters. A bit over a year ago we had a couple of our coldest nights in the last 40+ years with lows of 12F and 13F two nights in a row, my in ground citrus (mostly Satsumas) were covered, had heat lamps, and still suffered slight to moderate die back. Two years earlier one of my mature 20+ year old Satsumas lost its cover to the wind on a 14F night, had around 50% dieback, with no leaf growth until the following August, it is still hanging in there, but just barely, it produced less than 50 fruit this year, while my 2 other similar age trees that kept their covers each had hundreds.

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                          • #18
                            I'm also in Austin and growing Yuzu from seed. Will keep some for Yuzu and use the others for rootstock. Was going to graft Owari onto one of them. I'm curious, did you cover yours or put Xmas lights on it try to keep it warm during our cold snaps?
                            Wish List: Smith, Ital-258, LSU Hollier

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