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  • #26
    I have a Tanaka and a Big Jim. Both are seedlings and have not fruited yet.

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    • #27
      This season and for the first time, my four year old loquat tree produced some edible fruit. Despite their smaller size than what I'm used to seeing, they provided me with a special treat this year. I don't remember when I had loquat last time. It must've been when I was a kid.
      The mild winter helped in not destroying the flowers or fruit. I felt like a kid in a candy store as I filled a bowl after bowl from my 6 foot tree over the course of about two weeks and used them as snack. They did not have a lot of flesh and had large seeds, but whatever juices they provided was enough for me to take bite after bite of this unique fruit and spit out the seeds as I was enjoying a tart flavor in some cases from my garden when nothing else was yielding any fruit.
      Despite living in a borderline zone, loquat will always have a spot in my yard. Even without the fruit, I have used the fresh leaves to make tea. There are lots of claims out there about the health benefits of loquat leaves.
      Sas North Austin, TX Zone 8B

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      • #28
        Update: I've tasted a few Yehuda loquats from my tree but so far it doesn't taste any different or better than any of the other loquats I've tried, even the wild growing street ones that are smaller. It still is watery, bland, melon-like and sour with only a hint of sweetness. Maybe I just don't like loquats. I want it to have the richness and complexity of an apricot or a plum and it doesn't. I bought a mixed melon dish from the grocery store last Saturday that was sweeter with more flavor. I'm disappointed and keep hoping the fruit will improve if I give it a few more days. Perhaps a few more years with it growing in the ground will be needed.
        Click image for larger version

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        Last edited by Altadena Mara; 04-18-2016, 10:57 AM.
        Mara, Southern California,
        Climate Zone: 1990=9b 2012= 10a 2020=?

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        • #29
          The fruits shown on the picture is not ripe yet, you should wait for it to turn orange color.

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          • Altadena Mara
            Altadena Mara commented
            Editing a comment
            Thank you for the suggestion. I waited until one fruit was orange and slightly shriveled. It tasted okay, sort of melon-like with a hint of sweetness.

        • #30
          My Big Jim, and most of the loquats I have tasted, taste a little like apricot pineapple jam, just not syrupy sweet. When they aren't really ripe, they have more acidity. However, even on the same tree, the taste can vary a little, maybe depending on sun v shade on ripening fruit, some are more complex than others. I have not noticed my Big Jim being bland or dry. The skin is a bit thick and can be bland and I think it takes away from the flavor of the flesh so I often don't eat the skin. They aren't hard to peel, or even just eat it out of the skin but that is messy and gets sticky juice all over my fingers. My Big Jim isn't in a pot; its been in the ground for about 10 years.

          My Gold Nugget & McBeth aren't producing yet. I tasted a neighbor's Gold Nugget loquat 15 years ago and remeber the flavor being similar, before they took it out. The main difference I remember was GN was thinner better skin but smaller fruit and less flesh. I like the extra fruit flesh on Big Jim.

          Here is a picture showing the average variability in size of Big Jim. These were still a little yellow when I photographed them last year, and they get even more orange when really ripe. Both fruits had two seeds.

          If I thin the clusters to one or two fruits, they get bigger than in this pic, but I like more fruit so rarely thin.
          Coastal SoCal/ USDA Zone 10b / Sunset 22 / AHS Heat zone 2

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          • The_Gardener
            The_Gardener commented
            Editing a comment
            Where did you get your Mcbeth tree? I'm in SoCal, and looking to buy one. I heard that Mcbeth has smaller fruit size than Big Jim, but still big size compare to GN, and the fruit taste sweeter.

        • #31
          When my kids were little, one of their friend's houses had a "white" loquat tree grown from a seed. Its fruit weren't near as orange but still delicious. Is Yehuda supposed to be an orange or white loquat?
          Coastal SoCal/ USDA Zone 10b / Sunset 22 / AHS Heat zone 2

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          • Altadena Mara
            Altadena Mara commented
            Editing a comment
            You can tell from my pictures above that Yehuda is a yellow to orange loquat. Some people on a gardening forum insisted that Israeli loquats like Yehuda were the best tasting.
            The same nursery (Top Tropicals) sells a Vista White loquat that they claim is sweeter and several other varieties that sound interesting.

          • The_Gardener
            The_Gardener commented
            Editing a comment
            Mcbeth and Vista White is the two that I want to try.

        • #32
          I purchased my Mc Beth from a local nursery, H&H in Lakewood,Ca. I don't recall the grower on the tag, sorry. My Gold Nugget came from a different Nursery, Blue Hills Nursery, in La Habra. However, even at Lowes in late Spring last year, I came across loquat trees labeled Champagne and Advance.

          I was hoping to find scion wood of either Strawberry or Vista white at one of the scion exchanges.
          Coastal SoCal/ USDA Zone 10b / Sunset 22 / AHS Heat zone 2

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          • #33
            I was tempted, but they were all so banged up!
            Wishlist: leaning toward the French varieties, here's what I'm rooting/growing: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...it?usp=sharing

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            • #34
              I just planted a 3 gal Oliver Loquat from Tropical Treasures of Ft Myers, Fl that arrived healthy and in great shape clear across to Az. It is probably too late to fruit. I thought $45 + $23.49 shipping was very reasonable. I had bought two lychee trees from them before in great condition.
              WL:1-Bass'FavFig 2-KaryasPrasina3ParatjalRimada
              4-CDDPintada 5-Adriano's yellow w/red stripes
              6-Luv aka Wolf,I'm really dreaming.

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              • #35
                I had loquats in central Florida when I lived there. The better ones taste similar to apricots when ripe to me. You can use slightly underripe loquats as a substitute for cherries to make pies, just take out the seeds. They are popular as landscape trees because they have large evergreen leaves and the trees are impressive loaded with fruit. In Florida the various rare fruit clubs and councils can help you get plants of better varieties. In California the California Rare Fruit Growers has numerous chapters and also can direct you to better plants, also their site (crfg.org) has a fruit facts section that details varieties of loquats and gives growing instructions. The Rare Fruit clubs also have scion exchanges, plant sales, and usually plant raffles to help you with getting started growling loquats or other rare fruits. Loquats are related to apples and pears and can probably be used for bonsai to keep them smaller.

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                • #36
                  Anybody have an update on Macbeth flavor? How does this cultivar taste? Juicy? Tangy? Sweet?

                  Thanks in advance

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                  • bopcrane
                    bopcrane commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Would like to know about 'Macbeth' as well as 'Christmas'. Just picked one up on sale @ logee's for a good price, it's a handsome tree

                • #37
                  Here is a great article on loquats --
                  http://www.crfg.org/chapters/santa_c...afSepOct09.pdf

                  We have some very old seedling trees in the Seattle area. They produce well year after year despite freezing temperatures in winter. Here the fruit ripens late-- June and into July.

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                  • #38
                    I have several varieties I have picked up, Big Jim, Gold Nugget, Red, then have collected seeds from various places. My parents live on an island in GA and these things grow like weeds with huge crops of fruit. One neighbor actually had to cut off the top half of his tree as it was blocking his entire view of the water from his 2nd story patio. Snags some seedlings from under it and brought them back to FL along with seeds from various others including one at a DNR dock with giant foot long leaves.

                    That said, loquats are slow growers and take years to fruit. My Big Jim and Gold Nuggets have been in the ground for 3 years and they were two or three years old when I got them and no fruit yet. One that was on property when I moved in 8 years ago has only really started having fruit the last couple years, unfortunately not near enough to reduce bird predation enough to allow me any. Mockingbirds love to just peck a couple holes and move on(they do this to my apples too grrr).

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                    • #39
                      I had loquats in North Georgia, one a 25 foot tree. Great landscape plant with fall blooms loved by bees in a time when little else blooming. The winter only allowed fruits to survive every other year but the one tree was winter hardy for 20+ years, surviving brief periods of low teens and ice storms without significant damage.

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