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  • $2 million grant awarded to UGA for Spotted Wing Drosophila management

    "Spotted wing drosophila has emerged as a major threat to small- and stone-fruit production industries, and its management is challenging particularly in organic systems due to lack of organically approved control options," said Sial, who is an assistant professor of entomology. "I am glad to have the opportunity to lead this collaborative effort to help organic farmers develop effective management strategies to control this devastating pest in a more sustainable manner."

    More at link...
    A tiny fly is having a huge impact on American fruit farmers. Known as spotted wing drosophila, the insect is costing farmers more than $700 million a year in lost produce and prevention costs.
    Barry
    NE GA ,Zone 7b Low Temperature of 4F in 2015,17F in 2016,17F in 2017,6F in 2018,17F in 2019

  • #2
    Go Dawgs Fight this spawn from hell They are my major pest now. I hope somebody is sucessful they have not bothered my blue berries but really hit my figs.
    Phil North Georgia Zone 7 Looking for: All of them, and on and on,

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    • #3
      Not my BB either, think it is just too early in the year when they ripen but they are a pain to the midsummer figs.
      Cutting sales have ended for the season. Plant sales will start March 1 at 8 eastern time. If it is still too cold in your area I can hold your plants till a date of your choosing.

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      • #4
        I started getting them in my tomatoes at the end of the season too.

        Here is a direct link to the article. http://news.uga.edu/releases/article...ying-fly-1015/
        Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Zaffiro, Moro de Caneva, Nerucciolo d'Elba, Bordissot Blanca Negra

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        • cis4elk
          cis4elk commented
          Editing a comment
          They got into my tomatoes a few years back, but it was only one variety..Carbon. I like to let tomatoes hang on the vine forever, because they keep better there than on the counter. I think I only got a handful of tomatoes from Carbon that year. That was the first year I had SWD but didn't know it yet, the following year nearly all my bramble type fruit were ruined and that's when I figured it out.

        • don_sanders
          don_sanders commented
          Editing a comment
          For me, it was my supersweet 100 cherry tomatoes. I hope they don't spread. I tried to make sure to clean everything out. Did you do anything to prevent them subsequent years?

      • #5
        I'm glad the USDA decided to fund this research. Hopefully this research will provide us with more options.
        Steve
        D-i-c-k-e-r-s-o-n, MD; zone 7a
        WL: Nantes Maroc

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        • #6
          I still think bug zappers are worth trying, but hopefully it takes a long time for them to rebound from the winter of 2014/15 here. Like never.
          Calvin, Wish list is to finish working on the new house, someday.
          Bored? Grab a rake, paint roller, or a cordless drill and come over!

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          • #7
            What are they good for?
            There is a purpose for everything in this Nature world as I understand , no?
            USDA z 10a, SoCal. WL: Raspberry Tart, Boysenberry Blush

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            • #8
              I personally don't see anything they do that has a purpose. They were devastating last summer on mid and late crop figs here.
              newnandawg 7b Newnan, GA

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