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  • Quince variety for New England?

    My husband brought me home a gallon sized ziplock bag full of quince the other day. He got it from a coworker who has a quince tree as they were talking fruit trees and they both thought I would be "intrigued" by quince since I grow figs...🤷🏻‍♀️

    After doing some research, my plan is to turn them into quince preserves this weekend, but for now I'm just enjoying the heavenly aroma of the fruit. And, of course, my research also included quince tree growing which revealed they are hardy down to Zone 5.

    Anyone in New England (or the Northeast) growing quince? If so, any recommendations on varieties? Advice on disease/pest issues? Anything else I need to be aware of before buying/planting one?

    “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.”
    – Chinese Proverb
    MA 5b/6a

  • #2
    Gina ,making jam ,/Jelly is nice but herewe found quince can stay good in fridge over a month, we peel and slice very thin, put in microwavable dish drizzle some honey and cook a couple minutes and eat whiie still warm. amazingly delicious and beats jam by far. They also make a neat pie but need more sugar than apple ones. also one can add sliced quince to apples for pie filling and adds a subtle extra. I grow aromatnaya here but suppose any will work fine. Here advantage is needs zero sprays, and I hate poison on my food.
    Z8A NC SANDHILLS

    WISH LIST :CC, ZAFFIRO, CAMPANIERE

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    • #3
      Flowering quince, chaenemolese japonica, is much more common up here, and the fruit can be utilized similarly. For fruiting quince,cydonia oblongs, the variety Aromatanya has been hardy and seems to be able to ripen on time
      Jesse in western Maine, zone 4/5
      Wishlist- Figues Juane, Demos unk, Nantes Maroc, Thermalito

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      • #4
        ginamcd I have a couple of quince bushes- not sure what kind (I assume flowering as the fruit is small). I never really paid attention to it until this year (they were here when we bought the house). I pruned heavily, and got a few fruit this year. They seem to be quite hardy though. I know the quince used commonly for culinary purposes tends to be quite large - baseball to softball size, while mine are more golf ball size.

        Casey
        Central Ma, 5b/6a ish

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        • #5
          Thanks all. Based on their size and comparing them to pictures on line, it seems the ones I was given likely came off a flowering quince bush. If I were to plant one, I would want it for fruit so I'll see how the jam goes over then start the conversation over where in the yard a fruiting quince tree might look good. First however, if it survives the winter in storage, he needs to decide what I'm going to do with the vigorously growing peach seedling he dragged home after telling me he didn't want a peach tree...
          “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.”
          – Chinese Proverb
          MA 5b/6a

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          • Casey
            Casey commented
            Editing a comment
            ginamcd will a peach tree stay in storage over the winter the same way that a fig tree will? Under the same conditions?

          • ginamcd
            ginamcd commented
            Editing a comment
            It's a very young seedling that's not ready to go in the ground. I was advised by others to let it go dormant this winter and store it with the figs. Next year it'll go in ground. I don't know if peach trees do well in containers. This is my first one.

          • Sod
            Sod commented
            Editing a comment
            I have a young grafted peach in a container. I bought two at the same time. They do fine as long as the pot drains well. I put the bigger of the two in the ground over the summer. The other I’m keeping in the 10 gallon over the winter. Just like anything else that’s grafted, it has to be protected. I made that mistake with the first peach I tried to grow 5ish years ago. The rootstock is healthy, but the graft is long gone. I’ll be trimming it up in hopes I can graft to it in the spring.

        • #6
          Gina Walmart here had rather large peach trees in containers last spring tha tbloomed and set fruit.I thought if they actually took care of the trees one might be able to pick fruit at walmart.Predictably soon as warm weather arrived and the wal mart garden center experts failed to adequately water the peach trees all fruit as well as many leaves dropped off! I really think one could grow peaches from a tree in a barrel.but would need appropriate pruning as they can get quite spread out. but peaches take hard pruning well. Good Luck. Here I grew some peach trees from seeds and am also hoping fruit is good. Thomas Jefferson wrote he planted rows of peaches from seeds at Monticello and wild peaches grew all overTennessee from discarded seeds in the old days. In fact one previously widely used rootstock at nurseries was called Tennesse Natural and grown from seeds found wild in TN
          Z8A NC SANDHILLS

          WISH LIST :CC, ZAFFIRO, CAMPANIERE

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          • ginamcd
            ginamcd commented
            Editing a comment
            The person my husband got the seedling from said he's been growing and gifting trees grown from peaches that drop to the ground under his trees in the fall then sprout in the spring. He said they have all gone on to become good producers. We'll find out if this is true in a few years.

          • YATAMA
            YATAMA commented
            Editing a comment
            Sure thing,Gina I have read that seedling peaches are far more likely to produce decent fruitthan mostother tree fruits,some may even be superior. most are a bit smaller but all I have eaten were tasty,.sadly the rootstock varieties do NO T make nice peaches but I have enjoyed fruit off seedlings of Elberta and Redhaven when I was younger. and you get fruit off a seedling fairly fast and if you do not like the fruit is easy to cut off at the trunk and cleft graft something else ,even a plum! so wise move by your husband!

        • #7
          Click image for larger version

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ID:	628852 Hello Gina, I have a chaenemolese japonica bonsai,which are acid loving trees.
          Wish List: i258,Bi-39, LaRadek's, Bornholm, Sodus Sicilian,English Brown Turkey type trees,Any early ripening n cold hardy fig tree

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          • #8
            Gina, My bonsai is a Chaenomeles speciosa 'Contorta' , Contorted Quince ,6 yrs old, salmon flowers Click image for larger version

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            Wish List: i258,Bi-39, LaRadek's, Bornholm, Sodus Sicilian,English Brown Turkey type trees,Any early ripening n cold hardy fig tree

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            • #9
              Oh,Gina I forgot the reular fruiting quice gets soize of a drarf pear tree here 12 feet. However the flowering quinces are a bush like an azalea here and do not bear much fruit as bloom sovery early frost likks he beautiful flowers. There also exsts another quice ony good for cooking but waifgr soetimes one kilo(usuallu only half) smells heavenly and has pretty tree. It is the Chinese quince Pseudocydonia sinensis. I beliieve a few nrseries have it I know Okios does. Need 2 to pollinate so I got one from diferent nrseries. Start fruiting after maybe 5 years. Has ornamental bark and fall color is one of the most beautiful red we have here. Needs full sun for max fruit and fruit is great for cooking I love the pies. Fruit keeps at room temo 3 months here for me.Might make it more in cool garage. Fragrantizes m y entire dining room placedas centerpiece.Am having eye probs now so hope this is readable! I have no idea if cuttings wll root but could send you a few to try.Just sayso. , we all owe you for the fine advice have been getting esecially about DE!
              Z8A NC SANDHILLS

              WISH LIST :CC, ZAFFIRO, CAMPANIERE

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              • Casey
                Casey commented
                Editing a comment
                YATAMA It's funny you mention Azalea... the two flowering quinces that I have in my side yard, I thought were azaleas until I saw fruit one year. They were here when I moved in and I never paid any attention to them, until I saw something potentially edible of course..

            • #10
              So the quince jam was a huge hit here at home, and one of the three jars went to work with him for the tree's owner.

              And yes, it seems my assumption was wrong -- it is a tree, not a bush and apparently a heavy producer. His wife makes Membrillo with them which is a recipe I'd also love to try. He told my husband they still have plenty of fruit if I want more. I also put in a request for some hardwood cuttings when he prunes his tree this fall.
              “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.”
              – Chinese Proverb
              MA 5b/6a

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              • #11
                I had never thought about trying to propagate quince from cuttings, hopefully it works out! The Membrillo is a great addition to a cheese plate. I worked with some folks from Brazil that used to eat it with slices of fresh mozzarella- traditionally they would eat the mozz with guava paste, but we had the quince on hand, and that made quite a nice snack.
                Central Ma, 5b/6a ish

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                • ginamcd
                  ginamcd commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Sounds like they are rooted very much like fig wood - clean, scrape/score, apply rooting hormone, and stick in a cup of mix. Instructions say to cover with plastic, but I'll go with parafilm wrapping. And, I'm going to try at least one of the three I have in DE and the other(s) in coir.

              • #12
                Most fruiting quinces cannot be eaten ripe. One of the west coast fruit tree growers, either one green world or raintree has a Russian variety kuganskaya which I grow successfully in CT along with my figs. The fruit can be eaten raw if sliced quite thin but I have to admit that I'm not crazy about the consistency. It does have a tendency to have some tip kill from a blight but it does have wonderful flowers in the spring as well as nice fruits later.
                Woodbridge, CT. North facing farm. Little Antarctica Zone 6

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