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  • Coffee grounds...would you??

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Name:	Clearing-a-Drain-Clogged-By-Coffee-Grounds.jpg
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ID:	714722 I've been experimenting this year with using large quantities of coffee grounds in my garden along with leaves and wood chips as mulch on the surface.

    Anybody have any adverse experiences with them? It's kind of too late now, but...

    ​??
    Zn 8b "I may not be a smart man...but I know what love is." W.L.= My cup is full to overflowing, maybe next year!!

  • #2
    If you like a bunch of green mold, then go for it

    Don't put it on in a solid layer like a mulch, it will cake up and mold as I mentioned. Feel free to include in your soil mix as an amendment though.
    Richard - San Diego 10a
    2020 Cuttings Sale Link

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    • Bry
      Bry commented
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      Ever done bokashi?

  • #3
    I went into various starbucks and asked for used grounded coffee over a month period. Must have collected few hundreds pound!

    Before soil is hard clay, but now is so much better, plus attract lots of earth worms. Hard to attribute to the coffee alone since I also mixed in compost and woodchips mulch.

    Felt odd and weird asking for used coffee, but totally worth it.
    Sacramento, CA 9B
    WL: More space for fig trees!

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    • #4
      Starbucks is always happy to save them up and give them to you. Like others have said, do not pack them on top. Mix them in. If you put them as a layer, they will cake up and make it hard for water to get through, too.
      WL: Maltese Beauty, Dalmatie, Texas Peach, Buzzone Nero, BFF, BB10, Adriatic JH, Battaglia Green, CLBC, White Baca, Del Monte, Raspberry Tart, Watermelon, Edith Lamb, Thermalito, Hative D'Argenteuil, Azores, Martinenca Rimada, Paratjal Rimada, Golden Rainbow

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      • #5
        Coffee grounds are rumored to inhibit growth in large quantities. I've used them in small amounts; for larger amounts composting might be better.

        Let us know how large amounts fare.
        Johnson1
        Zone 9b
        S of Tampa Bay, FL

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        • #6
          FigHearted how do you mix it in? im thinking of using for my potted figs, do i need to like pull the fig out and put coffee ground under than put fig on top? or like mix it with new soil then i can lay it over without pulling the pot out?
          Please subscribe to my youtube channel all about figs and fruit trees thank you! https://www.youtube.com/c/kimtien

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          • AustinPermie
            AustinPermie commented
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            If you use it in your potted trees, be sure to account for that as part of your fertilizer regiment, otherwise, you might have more nitrogen than you desire.

          • Seattlefiggirl
            Seattlefiggirl commented
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            ahh very good to know thank you!

        • #7
          Earthworms love coffee grounds. Definitely add spent grounds to your compost. While a top layer will mold, it also dissuades (ie kills) slugs and snails because they can’t handle the caffeine, even in small amounts. It’s a great natural alternative to salts and baits.

          I've seen the theory that it stunts growth, but I haven’t seen that happen to my plants, but I don’t use a really large amount and all the grounds I use are spent.
          Willamette Valley Oregon, zone 8b. WL: zaffiro, Black Tuscan, rodgrod, campaniere, CLBC, de la Gloria, thermalito, del sen juame gran, Sangue dolce, Black ischia, Jack Lily, vincenzo, verdolino, Syrian dark, rubado

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          • JCT
            JCT commented
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            Please tell this to the slugs and snails in my garden. I tried to put a layer of coffee grounds around some plants that the snails seemed to love, but they went right over the grounds! I could see the snail trails go right over the coffee and onto the plant. I went back to Sluggo....

          • Sod
            Sod commented
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            Dang. Works great for me

        • #8
          Seattlefiggirl To me, no soil amendment is worth the risk of pulling out an existing and growing fig tree. Just mix it in your soil mix when first preparing to up-pot. Not a lot, just as an amendment. If it is too late for that, just mix it with other amendments or else just sprinkle over the top. Think of it like adding salt or other seasonings to what you are cooking (minus the tasting part, LOL). Sprinkle it on top and mix it in a bit. You have plenty of time to add more if you need it. But it is a real pain to remove if you add to much at once and clog up watering.

          I used to use coffee grounds, but have not for a while. If I remember correctly, it keeps ants away, too. I remember making a ring of the grounds about 1" - 1.5" thick a couple of inches away from the trunk. The ants didn't cross it. I then had to make sure that the leaves didn't touch anything else that the ants could and would climb up to cross over. The only thing is, if you top water, your ring will not last long if you are not careful.

          Also, be careful to remember that coffee grounds are small particles. They are also absorbent particles. Both of these traits make for good moisture holders in the ground. Too much of a good thing can be bad. The down side is they can hold too much water and upset the balance that you are used to when it comes to watering and lead to root rot for container grown plants.
          WL: Maltese Beauty, Dalmatie, Texas Peach, Buzzone Nero, BFF, BB10, Adriatic JH, Battaglia Green, CLBC, White Baca, Del Monte, Raspberry Tart, Watermelon, Edith Lamb, Thermalito, Hative D'Argenteuil, Azores, Martinenca Rimada, Paratjal Rimada, Golden Rainbow

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          • Seattlefiggirl
            Seattlefiggirl commented
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            thank you so much i think im not too worry about tea leaves i guess its the coffee grounds that is different.

          • FigHearted
            FigHearted commented
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            Seattlefiggirl, just remember that coffee grounds are very fine particles that do not dissolve. Any time you add fine, non-soluble particles to your potting mix, you are going to increase the water retention because you have increased the amount of surface area to which the water molecules will adhere. The amount of surface area in 1 cup of pea gravel vs 1 cup of coffee grounds is exponentially different.

          • Seattlefiggirl
            Seattlefiggirl commented
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            ok thank you so much to learn

        • #9
          Dans mon jardin...

          café à l'ail... Click image for larger version

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ID:	715036 café aux myrtilles Click image for larger version  Name:	blueberries 2020.jpg Views:	0 Size:	5.62 MB ID:	715032 mais jamais de café avec mes bébés figues!! Click image for larger version  Name:	early fig starts.jpg Views:	0 Size:	3.20 MB ID:	715034
          Zn 8b "I may not be a smart man...but I know what love is." W.L.= My cup is full to overflowing, maybe next year!!

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          • Bry
            Bry commented
            Editing a comment
            Sorry...just having fun with google translate. I mostly use coffee grounds in my compost piles along with leaves, grass clippings, etc. I'm interested to see if the coffee gives a nitrogen lift! Supposed to be 2.0 - 0.3 - 0.3 (NPK)

        • #10
          I don't know about figs, but my grandmother dumped her coffee grounds in the the raspberry patch outside her back door since the civil war (ok, 1930s) and as a child, I relished those raspberries.
          Dale

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          • #11
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ID:	715566 green manure bed Click image for larger version

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ID:	715567 grass is cut and coffee/leaf compost is spread over it. We'll see how it grows!
            Zn 8b "I may not be a smart man...but I know what love is." W.L.= My cup is full to overflowing, maybe next year!!

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            • #12
              Over the years, I've been told by a few good sources that coffee grounds are a beneficial addition to any garden...AS LONG AS THEY ARE COMPOSTED FIRST!
              Also can sprinkle a small circle around the base of young plants to deter slugs, because the course grounds tear-up their delicate undersides
              Oregon City, OR (Zone 8b) by Portland.

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              • #13
                I’ve heard they are great for acid loving plants like hydrangea and blueberries. I’m curious if adding much could adversely impact the pH of the soil for figs. Also, I wonder how much of a deterrent it could be for fungus gnats; has anyone had any experience with this?
                -Carl
                Marlton, NJ (Zone 6b/7a)

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                • #14
                  I've never tested this experimentally but I've read that because the acid in coffee beans is water soluble, little to no acid remains in the grounds once they have been used. Surely someone has tested used coffee grounds for acid content/PH?
                  Micah 4:4
                  Wish list: I 258, all of the LSU varieties and a bigger backyard.
                  Kingwood, Texas Zone 9a

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                  • #15
                    They are supposed to be quite neutral after making your cup of joe. And why do they call it a cup of joe in the first place?

                    LOL - you want gnats? Just put out a pile of spent grounds somewhere. Finely chopped, moist, organic material...... yum yum!! Hotel California for gnats.

                    You can check out any time you like,
                    But you can never leave!


                    WL: Maltese Beauty, Dalmatie, Texas Peach, Buzzone Nero, BFF, BB10, Adriatic JH, Battaglia Green, CLBC, White Baca, Del Monte, Raspberry Tart, Watermelon, Edith Lamb, Thermalito, Hative D'Argenteuil, Azores, Martinenca Rimada, Paratjal Rimada, Golden Rainbow

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