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  • Need help with strawberries please

    I have a few strawberries that survived the winter. Last year they did not fruit well but plants looked nice. I need help with a soil mix using peat moss and fertilizer advice. I want to replant my survivors in pots. Does anyone have the perfect mix for strawberries and advice how to plant in pots?
    RobertC-NEOhio Zone 6a.

  • #2
    Mine kinda grow like weeds. They are just in organic garden from Costco. I planted them in beds 3 years ago and I haven’t touched them, except to thin them out.

    I just use hose water and maybe some fish fertilizer.
    But if you are getting leaf growth and not fruit. I’m guessing you need to fertilize with something that has a higher P & K.

    Did they flower much?
    Vancouver, WA Zone 8b See profile for current varietal list
    WL: Cessac, Campaniere, Burgan, Tashkent, Blue Honey, Cardenillo, RGR, Dolce Calderai, Balkan Grey, Joualle figs

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    • ammo1a1970
      ammo1a1970 commented
      Editing a comment
      no, but they were large and looked good.

  • #3
    I normally use whatever I use for the tomatoes, either Espoma or Jobes organics. You need to thin them out or they would just keep suckering and no fruit.
    Moved from 10b to 7a

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    • ammo1a1970
      ammo1a1970 commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks Ill try that

  • #4
    What variety are they? Some aren’t supposed to fruit until the year after you’ve planted them. Did you plant ever bearing, day neutral, or ??!!

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    • #5
      I bought a 10-pack of Tristar from Lowe’s and all but one dried up on me. I was watering daily and keeping them under the grow light. Not sure where I went wrong, they all had large root systems. I’ve had the fungus gnats under tight control recently, too...
      -Carl (Marlton, NJ (Zone 6b/7a))
      WL: CdA, CdD mutant, De Tres Esplets, Tre Volte Natalina, Nero del Cisternino, Sangue Dolce, BFF, Noir de Caromb, Sao Miguel Roxo, Dall Osso White

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      • #6
        Hi Robert, I have been following your thread trying to find out what the "perfect mix" for potted strawberries is, if there is one. In ground they produce best on 2nd and 3rd year plants so your survivors would probably do well this season if you could leave a few in place. In ground the challenge is keeping the fruit off the ground, so straw is used. My best success has been growing them in hydroponic using an air stone. In ground they do OK but not as well as in water. My in pot results have been mixed. I even tried a Green Stalk tower along and other types of pots, just can't seem to get the soil mix dialed in right. My problem could be with nutrient, only using fish fert. and kelp in pots. I have searched You Tube trying to find a perfect mix for strawberries in pots without much success. Plenty of advice about not covering the crown, not much on soil composition in pots. Hoping someone can give us an answer Robert. Good Luck! By the way, "Happy Easter" everyone, a time for planting!
        Ed B. West Coast of Michigan L.P. 6a/6b

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        • ammo1a1970
          ammo1a1970 commented
          Editing a comment
          I have also read so many articles but not much on potting mixes.

      • #7
        Hmm, I didn't know there was a special soil mix for strawberries. I am guessing it likes moist, well-drained soil like most plants do. I have planted them with regular Organic MG mix and/or with added pine bark, or local nursery garden soil in NE or just amended topsoil in SoCal. They grew just fine. Usually, I get the strawberry plants online bare rooted. The ones at stores may not be under the best care for some time so I avoided those. The online sellers usually include extra plants just in case some fail. And I always ended up with more than I needed because even the extra rooted just fine.
        Moved from 10b to 7a

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        • #8
          Stark Bros. gives detailed info on growing strawbs (https://www.starkbros.com/growing-gu...awberry-plants) although it is more geared towards those plants that are already potted. Since I bought 100 bare-root plants (four 25-packs) and there is a sunlight acclimation process, I'm not sure about how to go about it. Am I to put all 100 bare-root plants into cups and then do a daily shuffle, taking them outside and putting them into the sun for incrementally longer periods before eventually permanently planting them? Or should I put the cups in the partial shadow of a large tree? Or direct-plant all of them and make a canopy of sorts which I remove for incrementally longer periods? It's my first season growing strawberries, I already bought a 10-pack of bare-root plants and they all died (I think by getting scorched under grow lights without any proper acclimation process...)
          -Carl (Marlton, NJ (Zone 6b/7a))
          WL: CdA, CdD mutant, De Tres Esplets, Tre Volte Natalina, Nero del Cisternino, Sangue Dolce, BFF, Noir de Caromb, Sao Miguel Roxo, Dall Osso White

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          • ammo1a1970
            ammo1a1970 commented
            Editing a comment
            When I acclimate my figs to sun I put them under shady areas of my back yard for about a week and never had a problem. I will also have to take my baby strawberry plants out side from basement.

          • RocketSkates
            RocketSkates commented
            Editing a comment
            My Strawberry plants aren't in soil yet though; they came a day ago and are just bare rooted plants. My permanent site for planting gets full sun all day, so that's where I'm stuck. Do I have to plant all 100 of them in cups and put those cups in a shady area? I can't leave bare-root plants bunched like they are and I can't plant them in their permanent destination (yet) if it will be getting direct sun all day, either.

        • #9
          Strawberry multiplies quickly. Are you sure you need 100 plants? What is your planned spacing and/or plot area?

          I would plant them directly in their permanent plot. Set up a shade cloth canopy to give them time to acclimate. Depending on the condition of the plant and variety, you may need 1-4 weeks to get them established. It is easy to lose the plants in the first 2 weeks. It is unlikely so in this cool weather.
          Moved from 10b to 7a

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          • RocketSkates
            RocketSkates commented
            Editing a comment
            Thanks I'm sure "I" do not need all of those plants; I intend to share the harvest with friends and fam. They were cheap though, about 25 for $10 so I thought I'd get 4 varieties. I have 3 plots @ 4'x8' and one @ 4.5'x18'. I would rather not use the last one though because, these being at my parents' house and alongside the garage, it is in dire need of painting which might happen this Summer. Also, I have a bunch of other plants (tomatoes, squash, etc.) It may be that I'll have to build a few more plots but if I can cram them in I'd really prefer to do that. I like your canopy idea; perhaps I'll rig one up from some old sheets, doubling the thickness and removing a layer after one week to introduce the sunlight.
            I'm usually a better planner than this although once in a while, I move on impulse with the mentality "we'll figure it out when we get there."

          • grasshopper
            grasshopper commented
            Editing a comment
            Which varieties did you get? The spacing on everbearing is typically tighter than June bearing. And June bearing is planted for matted row of daughters.

            If not carefully managed, you can end up with 4-600 plants in the first year.

          • RocketSkates
            RocketSkates commented
            Editing a comment
            Yeah there are three June bearing varieties and one ever bearing variety; the specific names are in the screen shot of my invoice. I think I’m gonna have to build a few more raised beds and/or giveaway a few plants...

        • #10
          RocketSkates .... Carl you can keep your bare root plants in moist coir or peat, until ready to plant. They need to be kept cool and above freezing if possible. Place plants in a little coir, in a Zip Loc bag, in the fridge crisper will keep them for 3 or 4 weeks with no problem. Or you could acclimate them to sun with the method I used.

          I bundled my bare root plants in groups of 20 last fall and stored them in a 5 gallon bucket with drain holes in the bottom. Bucket was 3/4 filled with moist coir and 6 bundles were spaced with roots below and crowns at or slightly above surface of coir. The surface of the coir was allowed to dry slightly and a lid placed on the bucket. The bucket was stored in my dormant fig area all winter. As soon a spring temps started staying above freezing the bucket was brought out, the lid removed, and plants were exposed to daylight but not direct sun. Little by little they were exposed to sun during the day. When temps drop below freezing the lid was replaced and bucket was stored in a green house that has a thermo cube heater set up. The bucket was bottom watered to maintain moisture in the coir. April 1st. I planted one bundle in pots, wanted to see how they over wintered, they were in good shape. The new roots were a bit tangled and most of the crowns were pushing leafs. These plants can be placed in direct sun because they have already been acclimated while still bundled. 56 plants will soon be put in hydroponic set up and the balance placed in pots and in ground. It takes a hard freeze to damage strawberry leafs but any freeze will take out blossoms. Some may laugh at this process but it worked well for me. Good Luck!
          Ed B. West Coast of Michigan L.P. 6a/6b

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          • RocketSkates
            RocketSkates commented
            Editing a comment
            Since I don’t have room for 100 plants in pots, I like the idea of keeping them bundled and acclimating them to the sun as bundles. I have no hydroponic capabilities other than an Aerogarden herb garden from my mom a few Christmases ago; I don’t think that will do me any good here except for maybe six plants lol. Thanks for all of the advice it’s really solid!

        • #11
          Here are the varieties I bought; on National Pi Day (3/14), all shipments from Stark Bros. were $3.14 (they called it their “Pie Day” since they sell so many fruit and berry trees). I specially like the well organized and thorough information they provide on every product…
          Attached Files
          -Carl (Marlton, NJ (Zone 6b/7a))
          WL: CdA, CdD mutant, De Tres Esplets, Tre Volte Natalina, Nero del Cisternino, Sangue Dolce, BFF, Noir de Caromb, Sao Miguel Roxo, Dall Osso White

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          • grasshopper
            grasshopper commented
            Editing a comment
            I had Jewel before and planted Cabot at friend's place but she let it grow like weed so had no fruit last year, now she probably has enough plants to sell at the farmers market

        • #12
          I have my transplanted strawberries from this spring in 1 gallon cloth pots under led grow lights in basement. I'm using peat moss, perlite, sand and composted manure. Last year I think I fertilized too much and didn't get many berries. I think Ill take them out of basement end of May or sooner.
          Attached Files
          RobertC-NEOhio Zone 6a.

          Comment


          • #13
            Strawberries are pretty cold hardy. I left all of mine outside throughout the winter. And they are growing whenever it is warm outside.

            You transplanted them this spring? You meant this month or last year?
            Moved from 10b to 7a

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