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  • Figs in windy areas

    Do you plant figs in windy areas? I'm near a river so get a lot of wind coming through the valley and I'm wondering if I planted my figs in the wrong location. I planted them in the warmest area with great sun exposure, but this area is windy - 10 mph with 20mph gusts in the afternoons. Is this a problem for figs? I could move them to the other side of the house where the wind is better blocked, but they wouldn't get as much afternoon sun. I'm in Western Washington State, zone 8b if that helps. Thanks!
    (PNW, Z8b) WL: Almost anything. I have to trade: tayberries, mints, moringa, raspberries, asparagus, grapes, sunchokes, currants, pawpaws

  • #2
    More sun is better. You'll develop a strong thick main trunk. No worries just don't stake it.
    My CollectionFor TradeWish ListMy Listings
    Zone 8A •
    Greenville, NC

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    • #3
      Thank you, Shaft. I appreciate the info. I haven't noticed any of the leaves tearing, so they seem pretty tough. But, I wanted to double-check before any damage occurred.
      (PNW, Z8b) WL: Almost anything. I have to trade: tayberries, mints, moringa, raspberries, asparagus, grapes, sunchokes, currants, pawpaws

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      • #4
        I’ve had to stand up my potted figs almost daily for 3months, Bricks and stones on top of the pot will help. I still have to stand a few Time a week.

        The figs that tip are in 5gal pots and 6’ tall with 3-5 branches
        Round Rock, TX 8b
        WL: Delicious figs

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        • Shaft
          Shaft commented
          Editing a comment
          Would highly recommend a bigger, heavier pot OR you can take some 5 gallon buckets (I get 'em free from restaurants) and fill 'em up with water, place them at the edges of a row of trees that might fall. Most of my trees are on a hill, so they lean one direction. As long as I prop them up from that direction, and put caps on the ends, it works for me.

        • Halligan-
          Halligan- commented
          Editing a comment
          My wife said no more money on dirt😂
          So they are stuck in 5s for now

      • #5
        Wind desiccation can be a problem for figs. It can remove moisture from the trees. Its always a good idea to find a spot with some sort of wind protection if possible
        Toronto, Canada USDA Zone 5. Wish List: Azores Dark, Malta Black, Sucrette, LSU Hollier and Violet Sepor. I'm always interested in trading cuttings if your in the Southern Ontario area. Thank You!

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        • ShawnaC
          ShawnaC commented
          Editing a comment
          I didn't know that, thanks for the info. We are in a fairly wet region, but I'll keep an eye out for moisture removal.

      • #6
        Bravo_Figaro he said it was possible to move the figs but that it would come at a cost- less daily sunlight. So he was wondering which is worse 1-windy spot or 2-wind protected shadier spot.
        Travis - Cincinnati OH. Zone 6
        wishlist- ondata, Verdolino, rosselino, https://youtube.com/channel/UCYp6pIa2-WlnommArTGKlpQ

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        • #7
          Here in New Jersey we get cold winters and the figs that are subject to our chilly north winds generally have more dieback. I stick varieties that are lower on my list and varieties that aren’t known for breba in those areas.

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          • #8
            Originally posted by ShawnaC View Post
            Do you plant figs in windy areas? I'm near a river so get a lot of wind coming through the valley and I'm wondering if I planted my figs in the wrong location. I planted them in the warmest area with great sun exposure, but this area is windy - 10 mph with 20mph gusts in the afternoons. Is this a problem for figs? I could move them to the other side of the house where the wPnd is better blocked, but they wouldn't get as much afternoon sun. I'm in Western Washington State, zone 8b if that helps. Thanks!
            Folks grow fig trees in Crete and other islands with strong wind. Yes, wind can ruin fruits if you leave them on to ripe. So on the windy side, you should harvest the fruits a little early before fully ripe. Leave fruits on tree a little longer on the opposite of the wind direction. If you leave fruits too long on tree, they can be ruined by birds, rain and wind too....
            Princeton, New Jersey, 6B
            flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/red-sun/albums
            http://growingfruit.org/ for all fruits

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            • ShawnaC
              ShawnaC commented
              Editing a comment
              I was thinking more about leaf damage, I hadn't though about the fruit being damaged. Probably because they haven't fruited yet. I'll keep that in mind when/if they fruit. Thanks for letting me know!

            • Red_Sun
              Red_Sun commented
              Editing a comment
              No need to worry about leaf wind damage. Fig leaves are thick and hard to get damaged. In-ground fig trees grow strong. Losing some leaves won't hurt the trees. They are not cotton candy...

          • #9
            I know it may sound strange, but if your wind mostly comes from the same direction, you could try a baffle of sorts.

            A few Thick (wood) posts on that side would divert or break up the wind and make it a little easier on the trees.

            Just a thought.
            Kevin, N. Ga 7b Cheers!

            Wishing all of you a bountiful harvest!

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            • ShawnaC
              ShawnaC commented
              Editing a comment
              That's a good idea. We had planned to put a grape trellis somewhere in the sunnier area. We might be able to design something with that to block wind for the figs without stealing their sun. I think grapes do ok in the wind, but I'll have to look that up now...

          • #10
            I live in a very windy area. One tree in particular grows just enough each year that some of the twigs grow higher than the protection given by the house and fence. It's never had a problem from wind during most of the year. The problem is when it goes dormant. The wind + the cold is a bit too drying for the unsheltered twigs when the sap stops flowing and they die off. Your trees should be ok but might need a light covering in winter.
            7B Southern NJ

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            • #11
              Originally posted by arachyd View Post
              I live in a very windy area. One tree in particular grows just enough each year that some of the twigs grow higher than the protection given by the house and fence. It's never had a problem from wind during most of the year. The problem is when it goes dormant. The wind + the cold is a bit too drying for the unsheltered twigs when the sap stops flowing and they die off. Your trees should be ok but might need a light covering in winter.
              Thanks for the response. What zone are you in and do you cover yours in the winter? If so, what do you use?
              (PNW, Z8b) WL: Almost anything. I have to trade: tayberries, mints, moringa, raspberries, asparagus, grapes, sunchokes, currants, pawpaws

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              • arachyd
                arachyd commented
                Editing a comment
                I'm in 7b. I don't cover mine but my house, fence and neighboring houses help block the wind. Just the cold alone in this area won't do much to hurt them. Anything not reasonably cold-hardy comes in the house in winter.

              • ShawnaC
                ShawnaC commented
                Editing a comment
                Thanks arachyd!

            • #12
              The only reason to block the wind is that it would help make the area even warmer. In your climate heat and sun are critical. So yes I might block the wind to increase heat. Other than that 10-20 mph won't hurt anything. In west Texas that's a calm day. The fears of drying things out might be a winter concern but not in summer. The best figs are grown in hot dry areas.
              Alpine, Texas 4500ft elevation Zone 7
              http://growingfruit.org/

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              • ShawnaC
                ShawnaC commented
                Editing a comment
                If that's a calm day, you must get some serious wind! I'm glad to hear that you think the wind will be fine, and I'm hoping we have enough heat. We placed some concrete blocks around them to increase the warmth a bit. I was a little worried about them getting too hot when we had a couple of unusual 100+ degree days, but they didn't seem to mind it at all. This winter we'll keep watch over them. Are there any specific signs that they are drying out in the winter? Do they start breaking or cracking? Thanks!

              • fruitnut
                fruitnut commented
                Editing a comment
                In 8A PNW drying out in winter isn't a concern. I don't really think it's a common issue elsewhere. The issue with figs in winter is freeze damage. After they are frozen they dry out not before. Once they are brittle and cracking it's too late. We've had 15-20F freezes in fall as our first freeze of the winter when figs were still green and covered in leaves. Two weeks after the freeze the branches were brittle, toasted just like that. That kind of weather is very unlikely in the PNW.

              • ShawnaC
                ShawnaC commented
                Editing a comment
                Thank you fruitnut, that is very helpful information!
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