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  • Got the problem that never had before

    In the last few weeks many of fig trees developed a leaf discolouration on the upper leaves. Regardless of the fig varieties or age. What could it be?
    The last fertilizer was applied 2 weeks ago (20-20-20). We had a lot of rain in the past week, on and off, but I don’t think that has anything to do with it.

    Please help🙏
    You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 5 photos.
    🇨🇦Ridgeway, Ontario , on Lake Erie. zone 6b/7a 🇨🇦

  • #2
    What area are you in? It looks like fig mosaic virus.

    https://www2.ipm.ucanr.edu/agriculture/fig/Fig-Mosaic/
    https://www.planetnatural.com/pest-p.../mosaic-virus/
    https://afghanag.ucdavis.edu/pest-management/files/fig-mosaic-virus.pdf
    Princeton, New Jersey, 6B
    flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/red-sun/albums
    http://growingfruit.org/ for all fruits

    Comment


    • Miracle fruit
      Miracle fruit commented
      Editing a comment
      I am in Ridgeway, on Lake Erie. I’ve been growing figs for over 20 years and never had this problem before. It just started recently, all the trees are in the pots. The only thing extra (apart from regular fertilizer) I added this season twice till now is GP3 Micro (5-0-1) and Fish Fertilizer. All the symptoms are on the upper newer leaves.

  • #3
    Are your figs in containers or in the ground?
    AFAIK, the fig mosaic virus is affecting more older leaves. Discoloration of younger leaves could be symptom of macronutrient deficiency, especially Ca deficiecy.
    Fertilizing (too much, too frequent) could have negative impact on Ca intake.
    Estonia, Zone 5 Wish List 2023 Improved Celeste-Florea-Red Lebanese Bekaa Valley-Teramo-Long Yellow-Iranian Candy-De Tres Esplets-Malta Black-Salem Dark-Olympian-Smith-Green Michurinska + Any tasty super early fig

    Comment


    • #4
      Leaf Mosaic Symptoms in upper leaves are usually Immobile Nutrient Deficiency and or inadequate pH...
      https://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-h...s-in-fig-trees

      My guess is probably Calcium, which also creates Mosaic symptoms on the developing Figs. Good luck.

      Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

      Comment


      • Miracle fruit
        Miracle fruit commented
        Editing a comment
        So with the next watering if I add some CalMag, would that work? Can affected leaves get the normal look or will they remain the same and just additional new growth will have a healthy look?
        Thanks

      • AscPete
        AscPete commented
        Editing a comment
        Miracle fruit ,
        If all is well with plant Nutrients and fertilization, the other alternative is a severe infestation of Fig Mites carrying FMV Infection(s).

        If plants have been isolated and healthy, the only way to get Fig Mites is if they were brought in on a new plant from an infected location. You can check the underside of leaves with a 30X or higher magnifier for Fig Mites.

      • AscPete
        AscPete commented
        Editing a comment
        Miracle fruit ,
        The Cal/Mag should help eliminate symptoms in the new leaves and Figs. The leaf and Fig mosaic will fade as the leaves and Figs age and thicken, but will never be eliminated.

    • #5
      I actually am currently experiencing the same thing. I’ve been doing this for ten years and never had this happen before. I was thinking it had something to do with the ph of my well water. I had city water at the old place and never saw this. I may sprinkle dolomitic limestone on the surface of the pots to see if it helps.

      Comment


      • AscPete
        AscPete commented
        Editing a comment
        Check your pH, both soil and irrigation water before adding Limestone...

        Limestone is alkaline and may move the pH up, your symptoms could be caused by high pH. Gypsum is usually a better choice, it provides readily available Calcium and Sulfur and is ‘neutral’, doesn’t affect pH.

      • Miracle fruit
        Miracle fruit commented
        Editing a comment
        I water my trees with rain water I collect and the pH is 6.7
        My city water is 6.8 but has a lot of chlorine in it so I avoid that

      • drew51
        drew51 commented
        Editing a comment
        Figs can grow in most pH ranges but like it at about 6.0 to 6.5. LSU Ag center suggests 6.5. I myself see these discolorations when my figs are too wet. The roots are not happy. Non infected trees look more yellow. Stress causes it now to find out what factor is causing the stress. For me this year it’s been raining like crazy. Roots are too wet causing a lack of oxygen so nutrient uptake suffers.
        Last edited by drew51; 07-16-2021, 08:15 AM.

    • #6
      AscPete ok will do. I was just assuming I was acidic because I grow in a pete bark mix. I put a bunch of trees in the ground last week so it will be intriguing to see if they rebound faster. I will post results here when I figure this out.

      Comment


      • AscPete
        AscPete commented
        Editing a comment
        elriba ,
        Horticultural Gypsum or Garden Gypsum... https://www.espoma.com/product/garden-gypsum/#tab2

        I use Espoma Gypsum, but some Sheetrock brand products have been tested as adequate substitutes when “Recycled”, providing the same plant Nutrients.

      • Miracle fruit
        Miracle fruit commented
        Editing a comment
        AscPete
        So how much of this Gypsum would I add to, let’s say, 10 gal pot now. I would have to remove the top mulch, put on the Gypsum and replace the mulch. Right?
        Thanks

      • AscPete
        AscPete commented
        Editing a comment
        Miracle fruit ,

        Yes, Granular Gypsum should be mixed into the top layer and watered-in with water or nutrient solution. Since you already have an NPK Feed Schedule watering-in with an Epsom Salt solution may be adequate @ 1/2 tsp Epsom Salt to 1 Gallon of water.

        Gypsum @ 1 Tbsp per Gallon of Potting Mix or approx. 1/2 cup is adequate to start. There are also instructions on the bag labels.

    • #7
      I am in Ridgeway, on Lake Erie. I’ve been growing figs for over 20 years and never had this problem before. It just started recently, all the trees are in the pots. The only thing extra (apart from regular fertilizer) I added this season twice till now is GP3 Micro (5-0-1) and Fish Fertilizer. All the symptoms are on the upper newer leaves.

      Miracle fruit

      Although trees in pots can be lack of certain soil minerals, but since you fertilize them regularly, I'm not sure minerals are the cause. Also, fig is tolerate about soil PH and it prefers slightly alkaline soil. Not sure what potting media you use in your pots. Typical soil-less potting mix, either compost, pine bark and wood chip based, is not that acid to prevent soil mineral uptakes.

      I'd do some controlled experiment. Apply some lime to some pots. Also control what water you use. Also try different fertilizers to compare.
      Princeton, New Jersey, 6B
      flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/red-sun/albums
      http://growingfruit.org/ for all fruits

      Comment


      • Miracle fruit
        Miracle fruit commented
        Editing a comment
        My potting mix for the last 5 years has been: 50% pro-mix BX, the other 50% is a mix of triple mix, shredded pine bark, vermiculite and a bit extra perlite. Then I add a bit of lime and chicken manure. When I mix all this, I do it enough for 10 pots to transplant and then start all over for another 10 pots and so on. It’s been all working great until a few weeks ago (maybe a month) when I start noticing the difference in leaves. In the beginning was just a few but now is on all new growth on 80% of the pots.
        I water with rain water that I collect in the 2 large barrels and that has a pH of 6.8.
        This whole thing is driving me crazy as in my mind I’m doing everything that I can, never had a problem before, and just can’t pinpoint on what the f… is going on. VERY VERY FRUSTRATING 😢😢😢

    • #8
      Hey! Probably too late, but In case anybody get the same problem. I recently propagated a sucker (you know, those branches that come from the stalk and had some roots already). It went pretty well, but one of the new leaves started having the same color patron. My untyition just made me turn the leaf and then I saw a litle critten thas was probably picking my tree. The parent tree is completly healthy and the rest lf the new tree is also healthy.
      Zone 10 - Balearic Islands, Mediterranena Sea
      WL - Not to be sorrounded by native pest

      Comment


      • #9
        Miracle fruit

        My potting mix for the last 5 years has been: 50% pro-mix BX, the other 50% is a mix of triple mix, shredded pine bark, vermiculite and a bit extra perlite. Then I add a bit of lime and chicken manure. When I mix all this, I do it enough for 10 pots to transplant and then start all over for another 10 pots and so on. It’s been all working great until a few weeks ago (maybe a month) when I start noticing the difference in leaves. In the beginning was just a few but now is on all new growth on 80% of the pots.
        I water with rain water that I collect in the 2 large barrels and that has a pH of 6.8.
        This whole thing is driving me crazy as in my mind I’m doing everything that I can, never had a problem before, and just can’t pinpoint on what the f… is going on. VERY VERY FRUSTRATING 😢😢😢


        I think this is a combination of a couple of things.

        1. The FMV is always there. When the plants get enough nutrients, the nutrients nourish the leaves. The FMV would not show.
        2. Since all your trees are in pots, with the hot and humid weather, the plants experience difficulties uptaking water and nutrients. So you get water and nutrient deficit.
        3. With your potting mix and feeding, I do not think PH and fertilizer are the issues. You probably would not have such problems if planted in ground.
        4. The other possibility is salt build-up. It seems the 20-20-20 and GP3 Micro are inorganic fertilizers. Since you keep a regular feeding schedule, the salt eventually builds up in your soil and this prevents plants from uptaking water and nutrients.
        5. I'm surprised to see that the plants continued to send new growth in the hot weather. They should just "stall" themselves of top growth over very hot summer days. I think the plants got "pushed" by the fertilizers.

        I think at this stage, you can try foliage or foliar feeding. Or shade plants from extreme weather. Also I do not know how large your pots are and how tall the plants are. Try to see if salt build-up is your issue. Also reduce fertilizer feeding.

        Just some suggestions since I've not had such problems.
        Last edited by Red_Sun; 07-15-2021, 02:16 PM.
        Princeton, New Jersey, 6B
        flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/red-sun/albums
        http://growingfruit.org/ for all fruits

        Comment


        • Miracle fruit
          Miracle fruit commented
          Editing a comment
          Salt build up? Maybe…I was fertilizing every 2 weeks with half the recommended strength and was planing to stop now for the rest of the summer. But since I water them just about every day, wouldn’t the salts get flushed out? I always water till I see it come out at the bottom of he pot.

          I was searching in my garden shed and I found (among many bags and containers) a bag of Glacial Rock Dust by Gaia Greed. I just also ordered on Amazon a pail of Gypsum. So I was thinking, maybe I can apply both at the same time, a 1tbsp per gal of soil as a top dressing. My pots are mostly 10 and 7 gallons, a few are 12 and 17 and some young figs are in 2 gallons pots, so I’ll calculate how much I will need. What do you think?

          The trees are anywhere from 2 feet to 5 feet tall and still growing strong.

        • Red_Sun
          Red_Sun commented
          Editing a comment
          I think frequent chemical fertilizing can be your issue. Every two weeks for 5 years? All those bad stuff stays in your soil. When you see water out of the holes in the bottom, only the run-off solution comes out. Bad stuff remains. Over time, all the salt accumulates. With the salt build-up, it has similar effect as bad PH. It prevents the uptake of water and mineral nutrients.

          I'd put a couple pots in large water basin and soak them for some time. Then compare. Over fertilizing is not good, particularly with chemical fertilizer.

      • #10
        You've been following the same regimen for 5 years (water, soil, and fertilizer, etc) and never saw the issue before? If so, wouldn't it be unlikely to be a nutrient deficiency. What's changed?

        Another thing that could cause that type of pattern on your leaves is physical damage from bugs.
        Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Verdolino, Black Celeste

        Comment


        • Miracle fruit
          Miracle fruit commented
          Editing a comment
          Nothing’s changed, but as I’m learning, it could be a calcium deficiency and that would give it a similar look.
          Also, there is no physical damage on the leaves, just discolouration. No bugs of any kind.
          Thanks

        • don_sanders
          don_sanders commented
          Editing a comment
          The spots themselves could be the physical damage. Mites you might not be able to see without a 30x - 60x microscope and even then they can be difficult to find...

      • #11
        I’m having the same issue. I sprayed and added fertilizer and it seems that finally my trees are improving. My CLBC got hit the hardest 😢
        DFW zone 8a
        WL: Bebera Branca,

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        • #12
          You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 5 photos.
          DFW zone 8a
          WL: Bebera Branca,

          Comment


          • Red_Sun
            Red_Sun commented
            Editing a comment
            The question is: is the fertilizer burn from foliar fertilizer, or from nutrient deficiency? Do you think either salt or out of balance PH would cause the "immobile nutrients"?

            But at least we saw the same pattern with potted plants over summer heat stress....

            I use organic fertilizer on all my trees. I do not see any of those.

          • Sulev
            Sulev commented
            Editing a comment
            Red_Sun, immobile nutrients are list of nutrients, including Ca, that don't redistribute inside the plant after it is once used. So they can't be redistributed from older leaves to newer leaves. As such deficiency appears primarily in fresh leaves.
            Mobile nutrients on the other hand can be redistributed, so in case of such deficiency develops, all leaves showing symptoms.

            Unbalanced fertilization, accumulation of salts into the soil, pH, drought, heat, etc they all can affect nutrient intake.
            Last edited by Sulev; 07-16-2021, 02:31 AM.

          • Red_Sun
            Red_Sun commented
            Editing a comment
            From all I see, they both are fed with frequent chemical fertilizer. I'd say it is the over fertilization or related salt buildup. Not PH level or lack of nutrient.

        • #13
          AscPete I thought the burnt edges was caused by sun burn.
          I think I used a low fertilizer like 5/5/5 I will have to check.
          what do you recommend to use to replenish does lacking nutrients and calcium?
          DFW zone 8a
          WL: Bebera Branca,

          Comment


          • AscPete
            AscPete commented
            Editing a comment
            azroc909 ,
            IMO the pattern of necrosis is not typical of sunburn, may be possible heat stress and desiccation.

            Gypsum and Dolemite Limestone are Calcium sources, all essential nutrients need to be available at the same time.

            Creating a Feed Schedule with your Fertilizers and Additives is the best way to ensure all essential nutrients are readily available in the growing media...
            https://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-h...-feed-schedule

        • #14
          I’d spray for fig bud mites. I had them a couple of years ago and they give you those splotchy fmv symptoms. The difference from fmv is that they spread from tree to tree in a localized area. Spray with a miticide or with sulfur and if it’s fig bud mites it will fix the problem.

          I posted this in 2019; I eventually figured out that this was a fig bud mite issue, and it was only then that I was able to fix the problem:
          https://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-h...ent-deficiency
          FigLife: www.figlife.com
          www.youtube.com/figlifedotcom
          [email protected]

          Comment


          • #15
            Originally posted by SubmarinePete View Post
            I’d spray for fig bud mites. I had them a couple of years ago and they give you those splotchy fmv symptoms. The difference from fmv is that they spread from tree to tree in a localized area. Spray with a miticide or with sulfur and if it’s fig bud mites it will fix the problem.

            I posted this in 2019; I eventually figured out that this was a fig bud mite issue, and it was only then that I was able to fix the problem:
            https://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-h...ent-deficiency
            I recall fig mite is more of a Southern thing. Does it exist in cold regions like Canada?

            I only get cuttings from other people from out of area. Some of them already show FMV symptoms. They have been separate and being quarantined. So I'm not sure if we can get fig mites....
            Princeton, New Jersey, 6B
            flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/red-sun/albums
            http://growingfruit.org/ for all fruits

            Comment


            • Miracle fruit
              Miracle fruit commented
              Editing a comment
              The only new addition to my fig collection are 3 cuttings I got last December from Harry and I believe he is in Florida.
              I overwinter all my pots in the garage that stays at 10°C all winter, but I put them in after the trees experience 2 to 3 good frosts and temperature down to -5°C. That’s usually mid to late December . So I guess mites couldn’t survive a month in such cold.

            • Red_Sun
              Red_Sun commented
              Editing a comment
              I'm not sure if cuttings will bring the mites. Also the FMV can become a strain that stays with certain infected plants. With stress, the FMV symptoms will show. They may not have anything with active mites.

              Several of the cuttings I started show FMV. After they are in one-gallon pots in full sun, new leaves do not show FMV. I'm sure those plants will always have FMV in them.

            • don_sanders
              don_sanders commented
              Editing a comment
              Cuttings can indeed have mites that could grow and flourish with the cutting.

          • #16
            An update to what I did so far to try to remedy the problem

            I got 1L bottle of Flawless Finish from a local hydroponic store that is usually used for cannabis. Three days ago I removed all the mulch from all the pots and flushed each pot with 2 to 3 gallons of prepared solution (8ml per gal of water). The water that was draining out was very brown, nasty looking. Five hours later I did the same thing again but with just clean water and more of it.

            Hopefully that flushed away all the buildup salt in the pots and all remaining nutrients and chemicals. Now 3 days later the soil it still too wet to continue with the next step so I’ll give it another day or 2 to dry. After that I will add an inch or so of fresh soil to the pots mixed with organic 4-4-4, gypsum, some powdered egg shell and rock dust. Then I will mix CalMag in the water and give each fig a gallon or so, depending on the size of the pot, to give the figs more immediate calcium.

            The time will tell if this helps to solve the problem. This was a lot of work and time consuming, but I’m hopeful. Maybe by next year things will be back to normal. Over the winter I’ll have to rootprune and repot about a dozen trees so I’ll see if that will make any difference as well.

            Lela
            🇨🇦Ridgeway, Ontario , on Lake Erie. zone 6b/7a 🇨🇦

            Comment


            • AscPete
              AscPete commented
              Editing a comment
              Miracle fruit ,
              Thanks for the follow up.
              Watering until run off is more than adequate to prevent any possibility of nutrient / salt buildup in the Potting Mix.

              What action did you take for the possibility of Fig mite infestation?
              Thanks.

            • Miracle fruit
              Miracle fruit commented
              Editing a comment
              VentSolaire I got it from Amazon.ca and yes it’s expensive but I had no choice. Besides, the stuff goes a long way.

            • Miracle fruit
              Miracle fruit commented
              Editing a comment
              AscPete Thanks Pete. I don’t think I have fig mite. I looked with 60 times magnifier on numerous buds and leaves and didn’t see anything like that.
              I think I had too much salt buildup and a total lack of calcium so I’m hopping this treatment will work. From now on I’ll stick to only organic fertilizer and additives.
              In late fall when all the leaves are gone and the trees go dormant I’ll spray the hell out of them with horticultural oil and later with neem oil, that should work too for next spring. Will see🧐
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