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  • What's the lowdown on in-line garden hose filters?

    Yes, no, features and benefits, Brand suggestion? Teach me. Thx, Sal
    https://www.amazon.com/customerpicks...78e726e57405bb
    Last edited by Salvatore; 07-20-2021, 05:12 PM.

  • #2
    Why do you think you need to filter your water? I've been using well water for years, either straight out of the ground or through my water softener and never had a problem. Only time I use filters are just in my drip systems.
    John, Z6a, Western CT. Just to have some fun growing stuff and maybe enjoy a few figs along the way.

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    • #3
      I find it hard to believe it would be very effective at the flow rates normally used when watering with a garden hose. One of the products in your link claimed 10,0000 gal lifetime. There's no way an activated carbon filter that size will last that long and still be doing anything useful. Another, at least trying to manage expectations, said to keep the flow at less than 1 gal per minute. Uhhh, OK, I guess if you only need to water 1 or 2 trees, but I'd be out there for 3 hours at a time if I need to tun the flow down that low..

      Nice idea for watering only a few plants, but not practical for people doing their whole yard with a lot of trees. That's assuming the filters actually do what they claim to do (mainly remove chlorine and chloramine).
      Richard - San Diego 10a

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      • #4
        I’d recommend using one if your pumping out of a rain barrel or some kind of collection system that might have random crud in it. If you’re running hose water out of your house, it should already be clean and safe. If not, you have bigger problems.

        I personally I have one of those camco filters for my camper. You can get better quality ones but those do a good enough job IMO.

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        • #5
          I have been filling two gallon water jugs and leaving them out for a day to remove chlorine. I'm trying to figure out they best and easiest way of dechlorinating my water. My water plant (DTW) chlorine is provided between 9 and 11 ppm of chorine. I read plants should be below 5 ppm. I was thinking hose filter or 55 gallon drum and catching ran water. That's why I asked, doing the research right now. I have 14 5 gallon plant right now. And that's going to increase, I just know it.

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          • jessup42
            jessup42 commented
            Editing a comment
            Campden tablets remove chorine. Homebrewers do this for yeast health. I tab per 20 gal or something. Campden is metabisulfite. Let me google right quick

            Damn im good! Dead on info

            https://wineandhop.com/blogs/news/15...-brewing-water

            Removing Chlorine/Chloramine from Brewing Water
            November 04 2014, 0 Comments

            Looking for another easy way to improve your beer? Most municipalities use chlorine or chloramine to sanitize their water. While it works well to make sure we don't get sick from drinking our tap water, it can impart off-flavors in beer. Here are a few easy ways to remove chlorine and chloramine from your water:

            Add campden tablets (our favorite way). Add 1 campden tablet per 20 gallons of water, let sit for 20 minutes (works for both chlorine and chloramine)

        • #6
          If you have the ability and the rainfall, rain barrel would be what I would attempt rather than messing around with filters and such if you’re that concerned about the chlorine.

          I’m on a well so I can’t comment on what level is safe for plants.

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          • #7
            I decided to go 55 gallon drum based on info gather here and about. Here is a good article on Chlorine and plants, https://www.gardenmyths.com/chlorine-chloramine-plants/

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            • #8
              That article says plants are fine at your chlorine levels. So why get the drums?
              Travis - Cincinnati OH. Zone 6
              wishlist- ondata, Verdolino, rosselino, https://youtube.com/channel/UCYp6pIa2-WlnommArTGKlpQ

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              • Salvatore
                Salvatore commented
                Editing a comment
                I'm going with water soluble fertilizer with 10% runoff each feeding. This way way I can mix a large batch in 55 gallon drum. I may hook it up to gutter for the rainwater. TBD.

            • #9
              I gave a filter a try once. Reduced the hose flow so much that it was painful.

              I don’t believe chlorine is an issue for plants. Or sourdough or wine fermentation or fish or ….

              I do let the water sit for a day or so before using in the fish tank but that’s it.

              And I do use rain water for my blueberries but that is more for the ph than the chlorine.
              Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Verdolino, Black Celeste

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              • #10
                Salvatore - I have a screen filter on my drip system to prevent clogging from debris.

                I know some claim chlorine from city water is problematic for plants but everything I've seen seems anecdotal.... I've been using it for years with no issues.... I wouldn't use pool water as concentrations are high but IMO if it's safe to drink, it's safe for the plants.

                If I had the option of well or rain water I would use that first... mostly because I'm cheap and I water a lot of plants... I'm looking at these slimline water storage tanks... they only seem available in Australia at the moment.
                Guildwood Village - Toronto, Canada - Zone 6

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                • #11
                  Sorry to hijack but for those with limited space who want to save rainwater for irrigation... these are super cool. I wish there was a distributor in North America

                  https://www.thintanks.com.au/
                  Guildwood Village - Toronto, Canada - Zone 6

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                  • #12
                    I try to let my tap water sit at least a few hours if not more to let the chlorine dissipate. I watered this morning and filled the bucket up to use later this afternoon. But if I need to water I will straight out of the hose. I do let it run a minute or so as it gets pretty hot in the summer sun. When it rains, and if I have buckets, I try to collect it.
                    NNJ 6B
                    Wishlist: Colar d'Albatera, Mary Magdalene's and the Virgin Mary's Fig, Red Lebanese BV

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                    • KDAD
                      KDAD commented
                      Editing a comment
                      jessup42 I will check the latest water test report but I can say that our tap water does have a chlorine smell, especially stronger early in the morning, which does dissipate when it sits.
                      Last edited by KDAD; 07-21-2021, 07:42 PM.

                    • KDAD
                      KDAD commented
                      Editing a comment
                      jessup42 so I was curious and checked our most recent township water quality report and they do use chlorine. "NJDWSC purifies the water with the addition of chlorine as the primary disinfectant." No mention of ammonia or chloramine.

                      What is concerning is the pH of the water is 8.0, or in the range of 7.7 to 8.4.

                    • jessup42
                      jessup42 commented
                      Editing a comment
                      8 is high but mine is 7.5 & impersonally trying to boost my pH for a better CEC ratio & better P usage.

                      I am from New Jersey and I am an environmental scientist and what is more concerning is the contents of contaminants in New Jersey municipal water supplies. I always recommend a reverse osmosis filter for your points of use for any situation. Reverse osmosis is not good for plants but it is good for us with the right supplemental filter to add an extra boost of pH and some calcium and magnesium back to the water so it is not completely deficient and everything doesnt suck nutrients from your body

                  • #13
                    I use these filters. I don’t think they are necessary for figs, but I have Jaboticobas that are picky about water. Once I started using the filter the leaves quit burning up.

                    https://www.google.com/aclk?sa=L&ai=...BAgBECE&adurl=

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