X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Late fruit

    Goodmorning y'all!

    Most of my figs didn't set any fruit or very little ,, this despite the fact that I'm located in the sunshine state of all.places. Although I would've loved to harvest an abundance of figs this year, I'm also aware that most of this babies aren't even a year old yet.

    So I'm trying the laissez-faire approach, you know that " que qerá será, what ever will be, will be". Next year we just try again.

    However, this morning I noticed little figlets on my young plants. And if it's taking 90/120 days to fully ripen , that puts us in October/November. That's around the time they start to go dormant.

    So I'm wondering if it's normal that they produce this late? Would it be better/beneficial to remove the figlets to achieve more production in spring?

    It's mainly the VDB's ,but I also noticed on the Hollier and an unknown.


    C.Florida 9B WL: I-258 , Black Ischia, Ham Rham, Ghoudane , Moro de Caneva

  • #2
    I don’t think “normal” can be judged on baby trees. IMO very good chance you will still ripen some figs this year!
    CJ in Memphis 7b/8a….tight eyes, nonsplitters...Pons figs, French figs, Mario figs & tasty Cali seedlings!

    Comment


    • FloraFig
      FloraFig commented
      Editing a comment
      I'm trying to decide whether I go for a couple figs , I really love to taste the VDB, or for vigorous growth and next year fig galore.

      But maybe letting a couple figs grow won't affect it at all.

  • #3
    I agree with TNjed, you could still get some rip ones.

    Depends on how many it's putting out.
    A few I'd leave them, a bunch.....I may take some off.
    Kevin, N. Ga 7b Cheers!

    Wishing all of you a bountiful harvest!

    Comment


    • FloraFig
      FloraFig commented
      Editing a comment
      From what I've observed this morning they have figlets on every node. They are probably 4/5 tall. Some a bit shorter, some tall.

  • #4
    When is your average first frost? That's a good guideline on when your trees will go dormant and whether or not your figs will have time to ripen or not. You may want to leave a few of the oldest figs on the trees and prune away the rest. This will allow the tree to focus on fewer figs as well as growth. Apologies if you are aware of this!
    Jason. San Diego, CA - Zone 10A WL: Boysenberry Blush

    Comment


    • FloraFig
      FloraFig commented
      Editing a comment
      Tbh,I don't think it actually freezes. We had a couple nights in the low 30's January through March. I think the trees that went dormant did this in December if I recall correct.

      No need to apologize, I'm still learning every day new things.

  • #5
    IMO, you should take the que qerá será, what ever will be, will be approach and let them be, sit back and let it do its thing
    5B - Chitown

    Comment


    • FloraFig
      FloraFig commented
      Editing a comment
      I'm attempted to do this. But I have made so many errors while growing figs, that I want to make sure I did the right thing.

    • Titaniumgiant
      Titaniumgiant commented
      Editing a comment
      I think you should let it be, specially you being where you are, imo, you would have no issues to get those to ripen up.

    • Titaniumgiant
      Titaniumgiant commented
      Editing a comment
      Quick look on averages for Orlando in november is: 78 / 58. Your figs should make it

  • #6
    My Negronne (3 years old) just decided last week it wanted to make fruit, pretty similar to what you were describing - very strange; double bumps for weeks and weeks and then all of a sudden in the span of a week it’s covered in tiny figlets.
    Eric - Seattle / Sunset Zone 5 - W/L: Granato - Now offering fig-pops, my rooting mix, and gritty potting mix! https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Brows...er=pacnorwreck

    Comment


    • FloraFig
      FloraFig commented
      Editing a comment
      PacNorWreck, you have a shorter season right? Are you removing them?

    • PacNorWreck
      PacNorWreck commented
      Editing a comment
      FloraFig I’m not going to remove them this year - I had to head back the tree last season to select a better trunk, so I will be heading back the scaffolds this winter. I’m fairly confident that the scaffolds will get enough growth this year to be long enough to head back in the winter, so there’s no cost to seeing what happens with the fruit. I do plan on re-assessing in mid August, however.

  • #7
    You can’t judge timing at all the first year especially if they have never even gone dormant.

    I'd leave all of the fruit. Most of it will probably ripen in your long season. If you want vigorous growth, just fertilize and water more.
    Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Verdolino, Black Celeste

    Comment


    • TNJed
      TNJed commented
      Editing a comment
      I agree with Don. If your tree is already 4-5 ft you have zero to worry about as far as next year’s growth etc. If you want the standard short tree form you’ll probably have to cut it back in late winter…
Working...
X