X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Using "Lechuza-pon" growth medium for figs in containers.

    I have been reading on different forums and places on the internet how people use what are typically called "gritty mixes" or "pons" as soil. These are soil-like mediums constructed with things such as expanded clay particles to retain moisture, inert materials, bark and things like that. The purpose being that these should be a better medium for plants in containers because the water movement and aeration is better.

    I then came accross this "Lechuza-pon" growth medium which is basically an already prepared one of these "gritty mixes".

    In my newbie head this sounds like a good idea for helping in places like where I live, where we get a lot of rain. Of course, it doesn't help with the humidity which is key, as @AskPete explained elsewhere, but still, I wonder whether it would help.

    Do any of you have experience with "Lechuza-pon" or other of these "gritty mixes" with figs (i.e., inert particles, turface, and pine bark is one example you see a lot of in internet)?

    Thanks!
    Panama City, Panama (13B) and Miami, Florida (10A)
    Current wish list: Nuestra Señora del Carmen, Smith, Col de Dame Blanc, Italian I-258, Alma

  • #2
    I grow my figs exclusively in these kind of mixes, what would you like to know?
    Eric - Seattle / Sunset Zone 5 - W/L: Granato - Now offering fig-pops, my rooting mix, and gritty potting mix! https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Brows...er=pacnorwreck

    Comment


    • #3
      There are a couple of areas I am wondering about.

      1) Fertilization - I like using granular chemical fertilizers. I just add about 1 1/2 tablespoon of these granules once a month and don't worry about it. I also add lime at a rate of about 1/4 cup per plant (but here the plan is not to use it monthly, but 3 times a year). Can I continue to use granular chemical fertilizers like I am doing now?
      A related question. Right now I am also adding some vermicompost every month. Can I continue to add some organic matter this way, or this one I should stop?

      2) Mulch - I have found that if I don't mulch, too much water evaporates from the top layers of soil. I figure that in these mediums it would be the same. So the question is, can I put a layer of mulch on top of these?

      Thanks Eric!
      Panama City, Panama (13B) and Miami, Florida (10A)
      Current wish list: Nuestra Señora del Carmen, Smith, Col de Dame Blanc, Italian I-258, Alma

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by elriba View Post
        There are a couple of areas I am wondering about.

        1) Fertilization - I like using granular chemical fertilizers. I just add about 1 1/2 tablespoon of these granules once a month and don't worry about it. I also add lime at a rate of about 1/4 cup per plant (but here the plan is not to use it monthly, but 3 times a year). Can I continue to use granular chemical fertilizers like I am doing now?
        A related question. Right now I am also adding some vermicompost every month. Can I continue to add some organic matter this way, or this one I should stop?

        2) Mulch - I have found that if I don't mulch, too much water evaporates from the top layers of soil. I figure that in these mediums it would be the same. So the question is, can I put a layer of mulch on top of these?

        Thanks Eric!
        1) I don’t use the exact same fertilizer, but my routine is similar with good results - liquid chemical fertilizer once or twice per month. You want your gritty mix to have something with a decent cation exchange capability / CEC - a measure used to estimate how well the mix holds onto fertilizers. Lechuza PON has zeolite, which has a sky-high CEC. Bark is very good also, as are a few others such as calcined clays. I personally would not add vermicompost - the organic matter percolates through the mix and fills up all of the air pockets and some of the mineral pores, taking away one of the strengths of these kinds of mixes.

        2) You can certainly mulch. Same concerns about organic matter, but only over a much longer timescale. Have you considered a green / living mulch such as alyssum? I think it would be ideal for someone growing in a tropical climate like yours.
        Eric - Seattle / Sunset Zone 5 - W/L: Granato - Now offering fig-pops, my rooting mix, and gritty potting mix! https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Brows...er=pacnorwreck

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for the clear explanations.
          No, i hadn’t thought about green mulches… I will research more about that possibility!
          Panama City, Panama (13B) and Miami, Florida (10A)
          Current wish list: Nuestra Señora del Carmen, Smith, Col de Dame Blanc, Italian I-258, Alma

          Comment

          Working...
          X