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  • Tons of branches - how did they do this?

    Hi,
    A nephew of mine, who lives in Miami, Florida, purchased locally some smallish fig trees in 7 gallon containers. He sent me a Violette de Bordeaux and a Celeste, which I received yesterday.

    I was very surprised to see the shape of the trees (all of them were similar). I am attaching a picture of the one that is suppossed to be a Violette de Bordeaux (I say suppose because it has an "HS" or "SH" written on the side). Anyway, what surprised me is the large number of branches that the trees have. I am imagining that the initial intention of these trees was to provide branches for reproducing.

    How did they do this? It seems as if they had sprayed some kind of hormone that induced branching. I am VERY intrigued about this. The branch that seems like the leader branch, attached to the bamboo stick, has not been cut.

    How is this done? Do you guys know?
    Attached Files
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    Panama City, Panama (13B) and Miami, Florida (10A)
    Current wish list: Nuestra Señora del Carmen, Smith, Col de Dame Blanc, Italian I-258, Alma

  • #2
    From a nursery? Probably tissue culture trees that just weren’t pruned.

    If you wanted to do it yourself, you could just plant a tree deep in the pot and pinch the tips a few times to encourage lots of branching.
    Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Verdolino, Black Celeste

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    • #3
      Yes, I think it was from a nursery.
      Panama City, Panama (13B) and Miami, Florida (10A)
      Current wish list: Nuestra Señora del Carmen, Smith, Col de Dame Blanc, Italian I-258, Alma

      Comment


      • #4
        Tissue cultures almost always produce multiple branches/trunks
        Louisiana Zone 8/9. W/L Whatever fig I don't have.

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        • #5
          Like mentioned it’s probably a tissue culture tree. Some ppl say you may get fruit sooner by removing all the low side branches and letting the central leader grow a strong trunk. You can airlayer the branches off if you want multiple copies. Also many people report that airlayers from a tissue culture parent will fruit sooner than the parent tree. Good luck
          CJ in Memphis 7b/8a….tight eyes, nonsplitters...Pons figs, French figs, Mario figs & tasty Cali seedlings!

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          • elriba
            elriba commented
            Editing a comment
            Thanks for the extra information. I will try air-layering it. This will be my first try at this too!

          • HeavyDuty75
            HeavyDuty75 commented
            Editing a comment
            In my learning process and eagerness to have some fig trees, I started out with a TC YLN and Olympian from Baker Creek in ‘19. I have five of each and have been airlayering and grafting to my other trees because I read that you have to do that to get the propagated plants to start fruiting. I don’t have any figs on the mother trees. Will they ever fruit on their own or am i even on the right path? Maybe patience is all I need. I appreciate all I have learned from you guys’ knowledge. HD

          • TNJed
            TNJed commented
            Editing a comment
            HeavyDuty75 Yes I think patience is all that you need. Others have gotten fruit from TC versions of Olympian and YLN within 2 yrs.

        • #6
          I'm not an expert at tissue culture trees, but I've noticed that a lot of TC trees seem to have a large 'knot' of wood at the base of the tree where a lot of branches seem to originate.

          VdB on it's own, whether a TC or cutting grown tree, likes to sucker a lot and it actually takes some work to keep it in a tree form rather than a large bush.
          Jason. San Diego, CA - Zone 10A WL: Boysenberry Blush

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          • AscPete
            AscPete commented
            Editing a comment
            Sometimes the callus at the base of the Tissue cultured stem (which is part of the TC multiplication Stage) is left on the new individual plant, creates a “Crown” which continues to produce multiple stems. That is why Air layering or rooting Cuttings eliminates this problem...

        • #7
          This is not necessarily a TC. Just cut the suckers off and leave the main leader.

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          • #8
            With "HS" on the container - not VdB, this can be seen from the leaves. This variety does not have a strong tendency to tillering and branching, or rather, it is normal.
            Андрей. N.-W. Кавказ, пень Абрау, 7б-8а

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            • elriba
              elriba commented
              Editing a comment
              Sorry Andrew, I don't understand, what do you mean?

          • #9
            Tissue culture
            Ike
            bergen county NJ 6b
            Wish list: oh lets face it Ill take any variety I dont have!!

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            • #10
              Originally posted by acerpictum View Post
              With "HS" on the container...
              What would HS stand for? Hardy Shicago in ebonics?
              Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Verdolino, Black Celeste

              Comment


              • AscPete
                AscPete commented
                Editing a comment
                https://www.agristarts.com/_ccLib/at...ages/avail.pdf

                Possibly Item Code: - ISCH...?

              • acerpictum
                acerpictum commented
                Editing a comment
                elriba : "I am attaching a picture of the one that is suppossed to be a Violette de Bordeaux (I say suppose because it has an "HS" or "SH" written on the side)..."
                In the photo is no Violette de Bordeaux, judging by the leaves
                I do not know how much figs "from a test tube" gives lower shoots, but the shape of the leaves should correspond to the phenotype of the variety, it seems to me.
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