X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Best slow, gradual release fertilizer?

    I've always used osmocote but am almost out. Does anyone know if there is anything new or better available?
    SoCal, zone 10.
    www.ourfigs.com Invite your friends.

  • #2
    I have been using Osmocote Pro. I don't know of any other comparable product.
    Jennings, Southwest Louisiana, Zone 9a

    Comment


    • #3
      I use Graco 13-6-6. It has been reliable for me for many years. I releases slow enough not to burn but fast enough to really get plants growing. I've tried a lot of others but for the money nothing else has been as good for me. I think it was $28 for 50 lb. it does have the minors.
      Nothing in the world takes the place of growing citrus till figs come along. Ray City, Ga. Zone 8 b.

      Comment


      • MichaelTucson
        MichaelTucson commented
        Editing a comment
        Hi Hershell. Just my two cents: that's more nitrogen than the other nutrients. In figs, excess nitrogen can reduce fig production (but makes for great and lush top growth). Maybe it isn't hurting your yield noticeably, being slow release. (And in small trees maybe you're actually aiming for top growth rather than fruit production). But for crop yield, I recommend a blend that's not so heavily tilted toward nitrogen.

      • Hershell
        Hershell commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks Michael. Last year I was concentrating on top growth and this year they will go in the ground and will get 10- 10-10 because it is not slow release and cheaper. Eaven with the high n I did produce a lot of fruit. Just another 2 cents though.

      • Darkman
        Darkman commented
        Editing a comment
        I just returned from a tree grafting clinic by MSU at their experimental station in Poplarville MS and after we potted our trees they put down a slow release that was not Osmocote. I'll find out what they are using. I'm sure it was economical and good quality. Is the Graco a local thing Hershell?

    • #4
      Last year I used Miracle-Gro Shake'N Feed and had good results.
      Art
      Western Pa -6a

      Comment


      • #5
        I use osmocote and sometimes that MG slow release stuff... I'm careful to choose one that's "flat" in its designation (e.g. 10-10-10, or 13-13-13). I'm not sure there's much difference between the two brands. But I also use a lot of well rotted organic material (and often compensate the pH shift that often causes, by adding gardener's lime). Also some bone meal. I know you're asking about just the "slow release" stuff, but I use that together with a mixture of other things.
        Last edited by MichaelTucson; 03-15-2015, 10:00 PM. Reason: added the last sentence.
        Mike -- central NY state, zone 5a -- pauca sed matura

        Comment


        • #6
          Hi
          I use Nutricote 13-13-13 with micros. Mostly because if you grow in a greenhouse it can get hot. One of my friend's say that Osmocote coating was not stable at 100 deg F or higher. Not sure if it is still true or even if it was true but he is an outstanding grower so I took his word for it and got the Nutricote. I think it is because the Nutricote releases chemically where the Osmocote is a thermal release.
          NC Zone 7a-b

          Comment


          • FiggieFive_0
            FiggieFive_0 commented
            Editing a comment
            Who makes your Nutricote, Sharon? Is it Island Supreme? Their factory is just right down in the next town over.

        • #7
          Thanks for all the recommendations. I looked around online and ended up going with the Miracle Gro shake n bake. On some of the larger containers the shipping is too high, but I got this via Amazon prime so no charge for that. In addition since last night when I put it on my wishlist (along w several other types to compare) it dropped in price from $12 to just over $6 for 4.5 pounds. It's N is a bit high, but I wont mind more vegetative growth. It supposedly lasts 3 months.
          SoCal, zone 10.
          www.ourfigs.com Invite your friends.

          Comment


          • Gina
            Gina commented
            Editing a comment
            Wow... less than 5 hours from placing the order, it's been shipped!

          • Thorntorn
            Thorntorn commented
            Editing a comment
            Gina,

            Miracle Gro Shake 'n Feed for roses and blooms - purple colored jug lid (simply because it has a lower N than any others). It works great of me.

            When it is finished feeding, after 3 months, the pellets dissolve completely. With Osmocote the pellets take a couple years for the resin pellet coat to dissolve. That's no big deal, but if you are absent minded like me, you will forget if you fertilized a plant or not. If you see Osmocote pellets in/on the soil, you wonder, "Did I already fertilize or not; are these old, used up pellets, or ones I applied last week?"

            Miracle Gro Shake 'n Feed also has lots of nice microbials: kelp, earthworm castings, feather meal, and bone meal, in addition to the big three, N-P-K, plus some other essentials.

            You can't beat the price you paid, too.

            Also, for my short growing season, a feeding in April, then again in July, and that's it for the year....couldn't be easier.

            If I see pale growth, not commonly encountered, I hit that fig tree with Miracle Gro powder for Acid living plants, for 2-3 weekly feedings, and everything gets rich, dark green.

            The above plus a lime feeding in spring, every spring, is all I do, fertilizer wise.

            Thorntorn

        • #8
          Trialing Island Supreme Nutricote 13-13-13 this year. It's a controlled release fertilizer. Local brand similar to Osmocote. We'll see...
          Faith, family, friends and figs. (Not necessarily in that order).

          Comment


          • #9
            For next time I think you'd be better off with one that includes micro nutrients. Osmocote plus has them. Last I checked regular osmocote and MG don't.
            Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

            Comment


            • #10
              LOL, I just now found an almost full container of Osmocote I'd forgotten I had. I'll sometimes buy fertilizers at yard sales for great prices. No traces in it, but I generally sprinkle about some Ironite for that.

              The new stuff arrives today.. It will get used eventually.
              SoCal, zone 10.
              www.ourfigs.com Invite your friends.

              Comment


              • #11
                A few weeks ago I stopped by the farm supply store and thought while I was there I should get 3 bags of 13-6-6 so when I got home I put them on top of the last 3 bags I had bought in the fall. Well 300 lb should last a few weeks as I only use it in potted plants.
                Last edited by Hershell; 03-19-2015, 09:14 PM.
                Nothing in the world takes the place of growing citrus till figs come along. Ray City, Ga. Zone 8 b.

                Comment


                • #12
                  Originally posted by Hershell View Post
                  A few weeks ago I stopped by the farm supply store and thought while I was there I should get 3 bags of 13-6-6 so when I got home I put them on top of the last 3 bags I had bought in the fall. Well 300 lb should last a few weeks as I only use in in potted plants.
                  Anything worth doing is worth over-doing, lol.
                  SoCal, zone 10.
                  www.ourfigs.com Invite your friends.

                  Comment


                  • #13
                    It's not slow release in the sense you're talking, but Espoma fertilizers ( PlantTone, GardenTone, etc) break down slowly and feed for a long while. I like to use them. "Synthetic" nutrient sources like osmocote will leach out while organic ones tend to remain bound up longer.
                    https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
                    SE PA
                    Zone 6

                    Comment


                    • MichaelTucson
                      MichaelTucson commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I use those too, Kelby. Had good results with them. Especially on tomatoes. (Figs aren't the only thing I grow).

                  • #14
                    Anything Fox Farms!

                    Comment


                    • #15
                      13-6-6? Why? And for Hershell, 300 lbs will only last 4-6 weeks. He doesn't play around.
                      Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

                      Comment


                      • #16
                        I've read somewhere that osomcote 3 month slow release might not actually be working for 3 months in hot weather, but is being released a bit faster, anyone else read this? I use the 3 month 14-14-14 formulation.
                        Von, Northern VA 7a

                        Comment


                        • smatthew
                          smatthew commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Yup - osmocote definitely is released faster in hot weather.

                        • Kelby
                          Kelby commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I'll 2nd. I've seen a chart where it normally lasts roughly 2 months but most nitrogen is gone in the first month. It really depends on moisture, sun, and heat.

                      • #17
                        My best tested Slow Release or Controlled Release Fertilizer (CRF) for potted fruiting fig trees applied twice per season (~ every 3 months)...
                        #1 ... MG Shake'n Feed Tomato 9-4-12 (with Calcium and Micro-nutrients).
                        #1 ... Osmocote Plus 15-9-12 (with Micro-nutrients and Dolemite Limestone supplement)

                        for more vegetative growth,
                        #2 ... MG Shake'n Feed All Purpose 12-4-8 (with Calcium and Micro-nutrients)

                        and last but not least,
                        #3 ... Espoma Tomato-tone 3-4-6 (applied monthly with a Micro-nutrient supplement).
                        You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 1 photos.
                        Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

                        Comment


                      • #18
                        I myself only use Dynamite. it used to be only available to professionals, nurseries and such. The ratio is excellent, maybe not for figs, but is close to the average ideal ratio for plants. Has micros. It also lasts longer than Osmocote, listed as 9 months. Not to mention I use a lot, so buy 7 pound bags of it.Price is decent, free shipping. Results have been fantastic. My 4th year using it. I do supplement with organics as the season goes on.
                        http://www.seedranch.com/Dynamite-Al...-organic-7.htm

                        Comment


                        • #19
                          [QUOTE=AscPete;n129360]My best tested Slow Release or Controlled Release Fertilizer (CRF) for potted fruiting fig trees applied twice per season (~ every 3 months)...
                          #1 ... MG Shake'n Feed Tomato 9-4-12 (with Calcium and Micro-nutrients).

                          Doesn't the MG contain a huge amount of sulfur? Wouldn't that tend to make already acidic potting mediums even more acidic?

                          Conrad, SoCal zone 10
                          Wish List: More Land

                          Comment


                          • #20
                            Conrad,

                            The answer is no to both questions...

                            Sulfur is a required "Secondary Macro-nutrient" that's needed in "relatively large amounts" for healthy plant growth but the "large" amounts are actually quite small in volume when compared to the total volume of potting mix, its affects on pH is also none to minimal. For example Sulfur is only ~ 0.6 teaspoon of the MG Shake'n Feed Tomato fertilizer required for the recommended 3 month dose for 5 gallons of potting mix. Sulfur is typically a byproduct and becomes available when many of the fertilizer ingredients and organic compounds (Sulfates) are broken down. BTW, I always add Dolemite Limestone to all my potting mixes which not only makes it less acidic, raises and buffers pH but adds Secondary Macro and Micro nutrients.
                            https://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-h...-feed-schedule
                            http://agr.wa.gov/PestFert/Fertilize.../Product1.aspx
                            You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 6 photos.
                            Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

                            Comment


                            • cjccmc
                              cjccmc commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Thanks for the very informed and detailed reply Pete. I thought I saw one MG with about 20% sulfur whereas Osmocote seemed to have much less. But as you point out the actual total amount is very small.
                              Last edited by cjccmc; 12-28-2016, 02:47 PM.

                            • AscPete
                              AscPete commented
                              Editing a comment
                              You're welcome...

                              MG Shake'n Feed Tomato 7.0% Sulfur @ ~ 1/3 cup / 5 gallon
                              MG Shake'n Feed All Purpose 4.2% Sulfur @ ~ 1/4 cup / 5 gallon
                              Osmocote Plus 5.9% Sulfur @ ~ 1/2 cup / 5 gallon.
                              Espoma Tomato Tone 3.0% Sulfur @ ~ 2 cups / 5 gallon

                              The MG Tomato only has 1% more Sulfur than Osmocote, but also requires less fertilizer per dose.

                          • #21
                            I myself never add lime, as I use tap water to water my figs, and it's so basic I certainly don't need more calcium. I have had problems with potting soils being too basic, and removing lime solved all my problems. In some areas it would never be a problem, but here it is a problem. All gardening is local. I grow blueberries, so have many pH testers and testing strips, so I monitor the pH regularly on all my plants. Results of regulating the pH are phenomenal. Also not all sulfates lower the pH. Something to do with how molecules break down. Such as weak metals like epson salt (magnesium sulfate) never change the pH. http://homeguides.sfgate.com/epsom-s...oil-49551.html

                            I find lime useful in my yard for certain plants I grow that like it more basic such as lilacs, or just to add as a supplement or to keep moss in check. I usually though use wood ashes.
                            Last edited by drew51; 12-28-2016, 01:24 PM.

                            Comment


                            • cjccmc
                              cjccmc commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Same here for me Andrew, tap water has lots of minerals that tend to make the soils alkaline. Judging from the way those deposits cling to my bathroom faucets I don't think there is any way to flush it out of potting soil with more water. I have never added lime either.

                            • AscPete
                              AscPete commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Andrew,
                              I am in complete agreement that hard, high mineral content and or high pH water can have a greater affect on pH than sulfur content of most fertilizers.

                              With peat based potting mixes soft or rain water would be best to keep the pH slightly acidic or closer to neutral. I'm fortunate to have my irrigation water supplied by shallow wells fed by source springs with soft water and a pH that ranges between 6.4 and 6.9...

                              Conrad,
                              Flushing / rinsing out the potting mix with soft, pH adjusted or rain water can and will remove excess unwanted higher pH, additives or fertilizers that might have been added by mistake.

                            • drew51
                              drew51 commented
                              Editing a comment
                              I do use rainwater when I can and I have some frozen right now. I store in the garage but was unable to this year due to a house guest and his bike in my garage! Argh! He's gone next month at last!
                              On flushing, I had to do this once for a low pH, not high. I put too much sulfur in one of my blueberry containers, and the pH was getting too low. Flushing worked well. I usually reserve rainwater for blueberries.When I have a lot I use it elsewhere.
                              If I had the space and set up i could catch enough rainwater for all.
                              I switched from using straight peat moss to using Pro Mix was it is buffered. So again don't need lime, it might be better to actually use peat to balance things a little more acid to off balance the water.
                              OH I also have cacti and about 10 years ago discovered they like it acidic. Making the soil acidic and using rain water tripled the size of my cacti in a short time. I got amazing results with the switch. The cacti all started to bloom like crazy too.

                          • #22
                            Dr Earth is a good organic fertilizer that will naturally contain trace elements like any other composted fertilizer (including the 'Tone's). You won't know the amounts or ratios, but they'll be there.
                            Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

                            Comment


                            • #23
                              If you are in SoCal or the Southwest, for that matter, you have to be careful with the thermal release fertilizers, especially now with climate changes. A heat wave in July will flood the poor plants with too much fertilizer when they are least able to handle it and then wash away into the ground water and ocean as pollution. It should work as designed for other parts of the country but I remember warnings about using it here when I was attending rose growing classes years ago.
                              Mara, Southern California,
                              Climate Zone: 1990=9b 2012= 10a 2020=?

                              Comment


                              • #24
                                Their are some great new slow release fertilizers on the commercial market. I need a lot for all my plantss. I need a general purpose I could use for most plants.
                                So far I have been looking at a few AM Leonard sells



                                I'm trying this one this so far I'm impressed with it.
                                https://www.amleo.com/andersons-all-...6-12/p/A18612/

                                This one looks good too, but a little bit steeper in price.
                                https://www.amleo.com/florikan-4-5-m...p/FLK18512140/


                                No need for lime (not needed anyway but some feel it is) with this one.
                                Good price for 50 pounds!
                                https://www.amleo.com/hyr-brix-fruit...-bag/p/FB50AM/


                                AM Leonard has free shipping promos alll the time, just sign up and wait for one.



                                Comment


                                • Figarious Maximus
                                  Figarious Maximus commented
                                  Editing a comment
                                  The Andersons looks interesting. With it's high N, might be good to start the season with it and then switch over to the Hybrix mid-season.

                                • drew51
                                  drew51 commented
                                  Editing a comment
                                  I thought so too, and the one I decided to try first. I'm impressed, you need very little.Also I need an all purpose. And most plants require a 3-1-2 ratio. Foliage Pro has this ratio, and so does this product. Individual species vary in requirements but for all purpose you want a 3-1-2. It's supposed to last 9 months. Most only last half of what they say, but 4.5 months is my whole season anyway! I supplement with a touch of organic once a month. It's not a complete fertilizer so feel the organic supplements are needed. I will try the others in coming years too.
                                  Last edited by drew51; 06-15-2019, 12:19 PM.

                              • #25
                                Are any of these "organic"? I've heard good about MG.. but if it's all chemical.. the concern is buildup of salts in the medium. Comments?
                                Bill- Zone 6b, Meridian, Idaho
                                WL- Lattarula

                                Comment


                                • ginamcd
                                  ginamcd commented
                                  Editing a comment
                                  If you make sure they get a good flushing from time to time, salt build up shouldn't be a problem.

                                • drew51
                                  drew51 commented
                                  Editing a comment
                                  In general Organic are slow release but you have to add monthly or so. I like using them. I use Holly-Tone still. my problem is I have so many plants, not just figs, peaches, sweet corn, raspberries etc. I probably have around 250 plants. I can't afford organic. Milorganite is cheap but not organic even though it is poop. Human poop! I really like it for my grass. All I use on my grass. It is now approved for edibles too.

                                  The acid rain we get does a good job of removing salts, I guess nothing is perfect. Advantages and disadvantages to everything.
                                  I kinda disagree with the salts arguments, as does not organic eventually break down to chemical salts?
                              Working...
                              X