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  • Spotted Lanternfly - Jersey (30 minutes outside NYC)

    Luckily none of them were/are on my fig trees. I killed 2 yesterday and 5 this morning. Roach spray slows them down enough for me to stomp them out, but I’m going to need a better game plan to control these pest. Only a matter of time before they are all
    over the eastern seaboard. I’m located about 30 minutes outside NYC in Keanry, NJ. I did report them to https://www.nj.gov/agriculture/divis...ed-lanternfly/

    You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 2 photos.
    Garden State 7a

  • #2
    One was spotted in Rhode Island a few days ago. That is too close to home. (MA)
    Worcester, Massachusetts, Zone 6a - In containers 1 gal - 15 gal. Wish list: Dore' de Porquerolles

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    • #3
      Yes they're in Rhode Island and spreading.
      Joe - Rhode Island Zone 7a

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      • #4
        I'm glad to say I have not seen them here. These traps look complicated until you read through and understand how they work but they are reportedly very good at catching the nymphs https://extension.psu.edu/how-to-bui...ly-circle-trap
        7B Southern NJ

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        • #5
          Are they really a problem for figs? What damage do they cause?
          NC Sandhills zone 8A. Wishlist- BNR, CDDG, and split resistant figs.

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          • cepeders
            cepeders commented
            Editing a comment
            I have had a lot of them this year and they really like fig and mulberry trees. I can’t detect any damage from them, the trees are still growing well like any August, but I suppose they can’t be good.

          • Rewton
            Rewton commented
            Editing a comment
            Part way through this video there is documentation of damage on figs: https://youtu.be/liopSwfvXaM

        • #6
          Oh boy man. Im not too far from you in kearny.... I will keep an eye out.
          Ike
          bergen county NJ 6b
          Wish list: oh lets face it Ill take any variety I dont have!!

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          • #7
            I see a lot of them in Branchburg where I work. Likely didn’t spot them in Livingston.
            Livingston NJ, zone 6b.

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            • #8
              I've been using a spray with 1 teaspoon dish detergent added to 20-30 oz of water, and this works very well to kill them (after spraying they die within a minute or two). Try that!
              East Coast, Zone 7a
              WL: Boysenberry Blush, CdDB, BNR

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              • #9
                I did have a nymph on one of my fig trees about 2 months ago that I removed and squished. I didn't think twice about it until now. I think I'm going to set up some traps and do some additional spraying to help control them before it's too late. I order some sticky paper on Amazon. I think I'll wrap the base of my trees to monitor/catch what's crawling up my trees from now on. I understand they can become pretty destructive if not checked.

                https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
                Garden State 7a

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                • #10
                  6 more today. I was only able to kill 2 as the other 4 were too far up in the tree for me to reach. Does anyone know if the spotted lanternfly lays its eggs high up in trees? From what I'm reading egg masses are found on the bark of trees or other smooth surfaces such as rocks, outdoor furniture and/or vehicles so perhaps they need to be lower to the ground.
                  Garden State 7a

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                  • #11
                    Originally posted by minacio View Post
                    6 more today. I was only able to kill 2 as the other 4 were too far up in the tree for me to reach. Does anyone know if the spotted lanternfly lays its eggs high up in trees? From what I'm reading egg masses are found on the bark of trees or other smooth surfaces such as rocks, outdoor furniture and/or vehicles so perhaps they need to be lower to the ground.
                    I had mine up on trees where you could only reach them with a sprayer. Once they hatch, you'll find them everywhere and it makes it harder to contain, especially if they grow to maturity. I spray early in the Spring and it has seemed to keep them in check. I still find a straggler or two but nothing like I saw the first year they were in my area.
                    Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania / Zone 6b

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                    • #12
                      Originally posted by BlueEagle1967 View Post

                      I had mine up on trees where you could only reach them with a sprayer. Once they hatch, you'll find them everywhere and it makes it harder to contain, especially if they grow to maturity. I spray early in the Spring and it has seemed to keep them in check. I still find a straggler or two but nothing like I saw the first year they were in my area.
                      Thanks for the reply! What did you use to spray them with?
                      Garden State 7a

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                      • #13
                        Originally posted by minacio View Post

                        Thanks for the reply! What did you use to spray them with?
                        I have a company that I hire that comes out and sprays my landscaping and trees in early Spring. But I also spray with Sevin and Dr. Earth. They both work and I haven't had any real issues.
                        Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania / Zone 6b

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                        • Figgerlickinggood
                          Figgerlickinggood commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Spraying does great in destroying the pest but just like all other pest the problem with that is when you spray but your neighbors don’t.

                        • BlueEagle1967
                          BlueEagle1967 commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Figgerlickinggood No doubt it doesn't help but I'm also not aware of any of my neighbors spraying and I have minimal issues during the season. Matter of fact, I've only seen a couple this year and none last year after I sprayed. It's far better than the alternative.

                      • #14
                        Saw one couple days ago in East Rutherford on a window screen, opened the window to spray him but it took off.

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                        • #15
                          A natural fungus that kills the SLF.

                          https://fruitgrowersnews.com/news/sp...-native-fungi/

                          Snip...."Now, the paper, “A pair of native fungal pathogens drives decline of a new invasive herbivore,” led by Eric Clifton, a postdoctoral researcher in the lab of Cornell University professor of entomology and co-author Ann Hajek, describes how two unrelated fungi, Batkoa major and Beauveria bassiana, have been decimating spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) populations near Reading, Pennsylvania."


                          Biopesticide that has been developed for this and other insects.

                          https://www.eagrovision.com/beauveria-bassiana/

                          Beauveria Bassiana-Mode of Action


                          As an alternative to chemical insecticide, enter the pathogenic fungi, Beauveria Bassiana. It gives us a natural means to fight pests.

                          Firstly, beauveria bassiana fungus spores land on the bugs. With high humidity, spores germinate. Secondly from there, they enter the pest’s cuticle. Thirdly, inside the host, the fungus multiplies rapidly.

                          (here are Pictures of insects being enveloped by the fungus)

                          This rapid multiplication of fungus leads to the release of toxic chemicals. Finally, this makes the host body devoid of nutrients. Eventually resulting in the death of the host.

                          Unlike other bacterias and viruses of insects, Beauveria bassiana infects the host only on contact. There is no need for consumption. The infection spreads just by physical contact.

                          After killing the host, the fungus grows back. It grows out from the squishy part of the cuticle. After that, the fungus covers the host with a layer of white mold (hence the name white muscadine disease).

                          Millions of new and very effective spores develop from this mold. Ultimately spreading in the environment.


                          More at link.




                          Zone 6B Shawnee Mission KS

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