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  • Peter's Honey: Caprified vs Uncaprified

    Hello Fig Growers,

    Recently I picked a few fruits from my Peter's Honey tree (and from some others, I will not complain this year seem to be good one).

    This time I got both caprified and uncaprified fruits.

    In terms of the taste I would prefer the caprified version of the same fig: sweet with some acidity and definitely more depth to its flavor than the uncaprified which tastes a bit boring, but still very sweet.
    My Kadota figs are very similar to Peter's honey and they typically get caprified as well.

    Is it possible that Peter's Honey = Kadota? I cannot do DNA analysis to confirm/falsify my hypothesis unfortunately.

    Click image for larger version

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    Istvan - Southern California - Zone 10b
    Wishlist: CdD Mutante, GM 175, Bordissot Negra Rimada

  • #2
    Originally posted by Istvan View Post
    Is it possible that Peter's Honey = Kadota? I cannot do DNA analysis to confirm/falsify my hypothesis unfortunately.
    And what is the original name of the variety?Peter's Honey doesn't sound serious. Kadota is the old Ottato variety, described in the 1st century AD.

    Kadota : Dottato, Dottato Abruzze, Adottato, Binello, Dattero , Datteresi, Dottato Bianco, Grascello, Trifero, Medot, Napoletani, Ottato, Uttato, Vottato, White Kadota, Clarkadota, Endrich, White Endrich, White Pacific, Ficus carica binella Risso.

    Here I have gathered useful information about the variety. You can use automatic translation in your web browser.
    https://bezmotika.com/blogs/entry/17...adota-dottato/

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    • #3
      Right it is not the same.

      Based on http://figs4fun.com/Varieties.html:

      Peter's Honey = Italian Honey = Lattarula = Blanche Royale = Lemon = Marseilles = Blance = White Marseilles
      Istvan - Southern California - Zone 10b
      Wishlist: CdD Mutante, GM 175, Bordissot Negra Rimada

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      • cybercop
        cybercop commented
        Editing a comment
        Which automatically means that many Peter's Honey owners actually grow another variety. We all know what White Marseilles (Lattarula) looks like. There is no resemblance to Kadota.

    • #4
      Originally posted by Istvan View Post
      Right it is not the same.

      Based on http://figs4fun.com/Varieties.html:

      Peter's Honey = Italian Honey = Lattarula = Blanche Royale = Lemon = Marseilles = Blance = White Marseilles
      Sorry, this is completely wrong.

      Blance = White Marseilles = Condit's White Marseilles. This is a hardy variety with its source from England. It is pretty much out of circulation.
      Lattarula = Italian White = Italian Honey. It is more common and less hardy.
      Peter's Honey is known for being a late variety. The interior is more pink.

      Thomas Jefferson's Marseilles Fig appears to be the real White Marseilles:
      https://www.monticello.org/site/rese...marseilles-fig

      Italian Honey and Peter's Honey may be related based on leaf shapes and fruits.

      Not sure about Kadota, Conadria, Excel and Dottato.
      Last edited by Red_Sun; 08-10-2021, 01:05 PM.
      Princeton, New Jersey, 6B
      flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/red-sun/albums
      http://growingfruit.org/ for all fruits

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      • #5
        The Peter's Honey and Kadota/Dottato connection has been suggested before. For example, Michael from Edible Landcaping, Inc. has stated this. However, others who grow both believe they are different. Lou Monti (a forum member) grows, or has grown, PH, Kadota, and Italian Honey and believes the three to definitely be different. I grow PH but not the other two so I can't really comment. Well, I do grow Rigato del Salento (PB) which is thought to be a striped sport of Dotatto. Beyond the stripes, it is definitely different than PH.
        Steve
        D-i-c-k-e-r-s-o-n, MD; zone 7a
        WL: Castillon

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        • Red_Sun
          Red_Sun commented
          Editing a comment
          I was given cuttings of Kadota, Italian Honey and another local honey varieties. Now I can't tell which is which. I do not even trust the markers/tags. I want to grow them and try to tell which is which. Not sure if I need all of them.

      • #6
        Originally posted by Red_Sun View Post
        Peter's Honey is known for being a late variety. The interior is more pink.
        I am wondering if this is accurate. For me and I have close to a 100 varieties (assuming an even distribution of early and late varieties) this seems to be one of earliest varieties with main crop starting in mid-July. It might not be a PH then
        Istvan - Southern California - Zone 10b
        Wishlist: CdD Mutante, GM 175, Bordissot Negra Rimada

        Comment


        • #7
          Originally posted by Istvan View Post

          I am wondering if this is accurate. For me and I have close to a 100 varieties (assuming an even distribution of early and late varieties) this seems to be one of earliest varieties with main crop starting in mid-July. It might not be a PH then
          I do not grow Peter's Honey. When I searched for varieties, it came up as a rather late variety. So I decided not to grow it. I do not have first hand experience.
          Princeton, New Jersey, 6B
          flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/red-sun/albums
          http://growingfruit.org/ for all fruits

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          • #8
            I think things are connected nicely.

            In Condit's book, he stated:

            A Portland nurseryman, B. R. Amend, in his catalogue for the season of 1942, describes this variety as Lattarula (Italian honey fig), a name suggested by some visitors from Italy.

            And elsewhere:
            Peter’s Honey: Brought from his native Sicily by the late Peter Danna (born 1901) of Portland, Peter’s Honey is one of the best figs we have eaten. Peter’s Honey bears good crops of light yellowish-green fruit with delectably tender and sweet, dark amber flesh.

            https://onegreenworld.com/product/peters-honey-2/


            By 1942, Peter Danna was about 41 year old. He was very influential in Portland Oregon. He could be involved with the renaming of White Marseilles to Italian Honey. Peter's Honey and Italian Honey could be the same. Someone renamed Peter's original tree (honey tree from Italy) in his name in his honor.

            More old discussion of this topics:
            http://figs4funforum.arghchive.com/p...-danna-2297959
            Princeton, New Jersey, 6B
            flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/red-sun/albums
            http://growingfruit.org/ for all fruits

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            • #9
              Peter’s honey isn’t late. It is starting to ripen now with my Mt Etnas this year. Generally ripened in the second half of August here.

              The interior is amber normally uncaprified. Maybe the slightest pink tinge rarely.
              Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Verdolino, Black Celeste

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