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  • Male Palmata?!?

    I found this seedling a couple of years back and it proved to be a male tree. It has beautiful leaves. Spades and tridents and appeared to have palmata parentage birthday I wasn’t sure.

    I was just chatting with Harvey and he mentioned that male palmata should have pollen with all 3 crops. I went out to take him some pics and to check. I found one nice fig that was almost ripe so I cut it open and was so excited to see wasp filled galls and pollen!!! This means that I might be able to get caprified figs for most of the rest of the season!! So cool. 🤞🤞🤞
    Attached Files
    Eric - Santa Barbara, CA Zone 10a

  • #2
    Game changer!
    Tom V
    San DiegoCa

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    • #3
      Nice find! So far I've seen green caprifigs and now this dark one.

      Any clues if its Persistent?
      Inland Empire - Zone 9b

      Comment


      • Evdurtschi
        Evdurtschi commented
        Editing a comment
        Unfortunately, I don’t have a clue. Since I have the wasp, it’s really hard for me to determine that

      • HarveyC
        HarveyC commented
        Editing a comment
        Evdurtschi fig breeders will bag them when small to test to see if they are persistent and you can do the same next year.

      • Evdurtschi
        Evdurtschi commented
        Editing a comment
        HarveyC What type of bag? I use organize bags but they have too large of holes, I think

    • #4
      It looks like ficus pseudocarica Very cool!!! I believe that to be the father of Kuato. You are very lucky man! It was used in early breeding programs and thought to be the same as palmata. Even tho Condit believed them to be separate plants.
      Louisiana Zone 8/9. W/L Whatever fig I don't have.

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      • Kid Fig
        Kid Fig commented
        Editing a comment
        goodfriendmike Awwwe man, so there's 3 now!

        Just curious, assuming (I'm still learning)that there are established figs out there that are successful cross pollination figs, is one of the 3 always dominate?

        In other words (for example), crossing pseudocarica/palmata with carica always produce only carica(s)?

      • goodfriendmike
        goodfriendmike commented
        Editing a comment
        Kid Fig We are always learning. They will produce hybrids. 0023 palmata hybrid. Kuato. all hybrids.

      • goodfriendmike
        goodfriendmike commented
        Editing a comment
        Kid Fig there has been no study on what one is more dominant. Good question but I have no answer.

    • #5
      goodfriendmike Thatd be a hard one to tackle (finding out dominance); I imagine that would take decades.

      Quick somebody get on this! Just know you'd most likely be an unsung hero!
      Inland Empire - Zone 9b

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      • goodfriendmike
        goodfriendmike commented
        Editing a comment
        Kid Fig I will leave that one to someone else. I will collect them therefore future fig lovers can figure that one out

    • #6
      It seems to me that it is impossible to find taxonomically pure fig plants in California. In these photos, the leaves are similar to Ficus colchica - the Caucasian subspecies of Ficus carica. This is probably an example of the feralization of cultivated figs in favorable conditions.
      They write that in Turkey they are sold in bazaars. Fig tree owners buy pouches with several infested fruits infested with blastophagous and hang them on their trees.
      Андрей. N.-W. Кавказ, пень Абрау, 7б-8а

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      • Kid Fig
        Kid Fig commented
        Editing a comment
        Serious. 4 types now!

        Do you know of a current fig that is a hybrid of this ficus colchica here in N.America?

      • acerpictum
        acerpictum commented
        Editing a comment
        Kid Fig This species, modern fig, Ficus Carica, was formed when mixing several types (polygibrid). So they write those who studied the question - where the figs have such a variety of forms of leaves, fruits, crowns, colors. North America did not participate in the process of philogenesis, it happened before the era of Great Geographical Discoveries.

      • Kid Fig
        Kid Fig commented
        Editing a comment
        acerpictum Figs must really be special. The fact that so many civilizations bred figs and recorded the data says it all.

        I'm finding more reasons to "love" figs everyday.

        Thanks for the knowledge drop.

    • #7
      This is why I believe its Ficus Pseudocarica and not Ficus Palmata. Check the leaves and coloration. https://www2.palomar.edu/users/warmstrong/ArbNews10.htm
      Louisiana Zone 8/9. W/L Whatever fig I don't have.

      Comment


      • Kid Fig
        Kid Fig commented
        Editing a comment
        Sheesh. You guys really know your stuff.

        Your figs must be of the highest quality cuz if you know all this, there's no way they would be otherwise.


        One day.....

      • goodfriendmike
        goodfriendmike commented
        Editing a comment
        Kid Fig I don't know half of what some of the people on here know.
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