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  • Should I sell cuttings of whose origin I am not sure?

    I will be pruning my trees this winter. I normally save the cuttings in case some of my trees do not make it through the winter. I need to prune my trees and so I will have a lot of cuttings. So I will have cuttings that I could discard or sell. I know where I got them. All of my trees and cuttings I used to start trees were from Ourfigs.com people. But I feel uneasy selling them because I am not 100% sure of their origin. For example, I got my Black Bethlehem from John Doe, but how can I be sure it really is a Black Bethlehem?
    So, should I toss the cuttings or sell them?
    Worcester, Massachusetts, Zone 6a - In containers 1 gal - 15 gal. Wish list: Dore' de Porquerolles

  • #2
    What most responsible people would do is sell the cuttings saying explicitly, "I bought the mother tree (or sticks that became the mother tree) from X as the named variety Y." You could go a step further by going back to X to ask where he/she got the grandmother. And if that seller is responsible, you could trace the provenance back additional steps.

    So for example, when I give people cuttings of Florea, I say, "I bought the mother tree from X [name withheld here to protect privacy] who received it from Herman." That is, I think, as good as you can do.
    Joe, Z6B, RI.

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    • #3
      You could add UNK(nown) to it.

      And also you could sell it cheap and explain why its UNK.


      Best case scenario; buyer realizes it is a Black Bethlehem 3 years down the road after given a chance to grow and produce figs to make comparisons.

      Worst case scenario; buyer realizes it isn't a Black Bethlehem but they got it for cheap and they knew the risk.

      Kinda like a lotto scratcher, but instead of losing you get "ticket"; it's a gamble for sure.
      Inland Empire - Zone 9b

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      • #4
        As long as you disclose the information you have on their background, I don't see an issue with selling them.
        Let people make the choice if they want to buy or not.

        Kevin, N. Ga 7b Cheers!

        Wishing all of you a bountiful harvest!

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        • #5
          Offer them very cheaply to figsters who've got only a few varieties and would be happy to take a chance on an UNK. You may want to take pictures of the mother trees. I wouldn't offer any IDs (guesses) on the trees' origin. Some sellers distribute their surplus cuttings at no cost other than shipping, while novice buyers are looking to master their propagation skills w/o breaking the bank.
          Oregon City, OR (Zone 8b) by Portland.

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          • #6
            Most important question to answer is, have you fruited them and do they seem to be true?

            If you have not fruited them, then you risk selling possible mis-labeled cuttings. If you state clearly in your ad that you have not fruited them and people choose to buy them anyway, keep a list of your buyers so that if next year you do determine it's not true to type/mislabeled, you can alert them before they turn around and sell/trade/share cuttings off their trees. I recently had to do that with a mislabeled variety, but I did not sell the cuttings, but gifted them so I did not have to navigate the issue of refunding or replacing.
            Last edited by ginamcd; 08-22-2021, 12:11 AM.
            “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.”
            – Source Unknown
            MA 5b/6a

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            • #7
              Some of the best varieties are unknowns. lol I don't think you should sell them but give them away to folks who would appreciate them no matter what the variety. This way there are no hard feelings. If you decide to sell them, be upfront about how you got them and have pictures of the fruits the trees produced. The buyers will know they are taking a chance and know exactly what to expect from their cuttings.
              8A GA Wishlist: Black Socorro,Ponte Tresa,Stella,White Adriatic #1, Cavaliere, Colonel Littman's Black Cross, heirloom figs that have been passed down from generation to generation

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              • #8
                You will bare responsibility if your cuttings end up not true to advertised kind. It happened to me once when I sold a pair of cuttings from the tree that I rooted, but didn’t yet have ripped fruit. It appeared to be junk that I exchanged with another person from the Facebook fig exchange forum. When realized the mistake I made, I refunded buyer a year after, and apologized for the screw up. I also gave few cuttings to my friends…. It was embarrassing experience that I wish I have never done.
                Last edited by Vitaly Krovlev; 08-22-2021, 11:58 AM.
                Livingston NJ, zone 6b.

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                • #9
                  Ask the member who you received the cuttings from if they know the source and if they know their tree to be true to type. The fact you're asking how to go about it is a good first step. 👍
                  Joe - Rhode Island Zone 7a

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                  • #10
                    What Ginamcd said is spot on.
                    Angel #1 at 2 Angels Mushrooms & Figs-Chattanooga, TN Zone 7-B
                    You are invited to The Fig Frolic on Sat., Sept. 17th, AND Hang Time (for OurFigs only) INFO HERE

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                    • #11
                      That's why I personally rather give them away. I have no clue whether the variety is exactly the same as the original.

                      I love growing figs, and learning about all the differences. But I know I'm not going to dedicate the time to trace it back to see if it's true.
                      C.Florida 9B WL: I-258 , Black Ischia, Ham Rham, Ghoudane , Moro de Caneva

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                      • #12
                        Fruit them first if you’re selling.

                        ​​​​​….there’s enough “not” varieties out there.

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                        • #13
                          it takes a careful plan, bright light and a car battery. how you obtain the other member, i don't want to know.
                          Pete
                          USDA Zone 7b
                          Piedmont NC

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