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  • Very Interesting Grafting technique

    While I research something I see tis video on grafting. I can no wait to try tis. Anyone do tis or see before?


    Zone 5 Chicago IL Wish list:
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  • #2
    Its very similar to the banana or four-flap graft method. I saw some guy who did the banana method successfully for figs on facebook. Very interesting method and you're definitely getting good cambium contact with that method. lol

    Texas A&M University - Academic analyses and information on horticultural crops ranging from fruits and nuts to ornamentals, viticulture and wine.


    Dr. Charles Rohla, pecan researcher at The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, demonstrates a four-flap (or "banana") graft on a pecan tree seedling. This "Amer...
    May the Figs be with you!
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    • ross
      ross commented
      Editing a comment
      The four flap method looks fantastic, Matt. I think I'm gonna try it.

    • Taverna78
      Taverna78 commented
      Editing a comment
      Banana graft works well tho tis method is similar I would think tis could be better due to less open wound like banana grafting. Also I think tis is more of a bud graft vs a cutting graft

  • #3
    Really cool, but I'm not sure the bark will peel/slide off like that on fig trees.
    Zone 7A - Philadelphia
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    • #4
      I know fig wood peel exactly like that. You must peel for banana graft. Notice how he peels in the beginning. Then squeeze and twist all way down?
      Zone 5 Chicago IL Wish list:
      1) Rest peacfully Amico Bello Buddy ๐Ÿ‘ผ๐Ÿผ.
      2) This weeks ebay auctions.

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      • #5
        That's a very neat budding technique. It does have limitations. It's only useful for long straight pieces of wood of similar diameter. And the bark needs to be slipping very well. The bark will slip like that if the plant is growing rapidly. If bark isn't slipping one would need to try something like chip budding.

        Figs are easy to graft or bud. Anything I've tried so far that makes for good cambium contact has worked.
        Alpine, Texas 4500ft elevation Zone 7
        http://growingfruit.org/

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        • #6
          This type is good for nut trees, as I understand it.
          https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
          SE PA
          Zone 6

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          • #7
            Where is the cambium on a fig tree when bark is slipping? Is it on the slipped off piece of bark or elsewhere?
            Conrad, SoCal zone 10
            Wish List: More Land

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            • #8
              Inside bark
              Zone 5 Chicago IL Wish list:
              1) Rest peacfully Amico Bello Buddy ๐Ÿ‘ผ๐Ÿผ.
              2) This weeks ebay auctions.

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              • #9
                I liked how he kept moving further and further down the stem until he got a tight fit. That's a detail that I hadn't seen illustrated before.

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                • #10
                  Here's what I don't get: If the cambium layer detaches and goes with the bark ring that was peeled off the scion, then where is the cambium on the rootstock for that bark ring to contact?
                  Conrad, SoCal zone 10
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                  • #11
                    Conrad:

                    The cambium layer splits in two. The outer layer that's forming the bark goes with the bark. The inner layer that forms the wood stays on the wood. So when that ring of bark is slid down onto the stick of wood the two layers are again in contact and heal back together.

                    The cambium splits in two in the middle because the middle is where new cells of wood and bark are being formed. That's the actively growing part and the weakest.

                    When growth creases those cambium layers quit growing and fuse together. At that point the bark is no longer "slipping".

                    If the bark isn't slipping then grafting techniques that rely on slipping bark can't be preformed. Examples that require slipping bark are: T budding, patch budding, and ring budding as shown.

                    Other techniques can be preformed when bark isn't slipping like chip budding, whip/tongue, and cleft grafting. Those three techniques don't have full contact of the two cambium layers. The contact is that thin zone between wood and bark. You try to line those zones up as much as possible. That's what you were trying to do on that whip and tongue you posted about earlier.
                    Last edited by fruitnut; 10-11-2016, 01:54 PM.
                    Alpine, Texas 4500ft elevation Zone 7
                    http://growingfruit.org/

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                    • cjccmc
                      cjccmc commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Thanks for the explanation, that makes sense. Thinking about that, a typical T-bud would have a relatively large amount of cambium contact and alignment is not so critical. A whip or cleft graft requires a fairly precise placement as the cambiums that need contact are very thin. True?

                    • fruitnut
                      fruitnut commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Yes when T budding alignment isn't critical at all. But getting the bud cleanly and fully under the bark is critical. To do that the bark needs to be slipping very well on the understock. If bark isn't slipping water heavily at least a week before trying to T bud.

                      On the other hand alignment is critical on whip, chip, or cleft. On those you even need to account for the difference in thickness of the bark.
                      Last edited by fruitnut; 10-11-2016, 02:31 PM.

                    • Taverna78
                      Taverna78 commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Belle ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿผ

                  • #12
                    Ahhh. this explains a lot. Been wondering about much of what fruitnut just explained. Pulls together a lot of pieces to now make a picture. Thank you fruitnut.

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                    • #13
                      Very interesting, I wonder if this method will work with Jujube trees. The bark on those trees is very hard. I will definitely try it someday.
                      Thank You for posting.
                      Sas North Austin, TX Zone 8B

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