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  • Successful Potting Mix Recipes

    Many members have discussed and often posted their preferred mixes, the major ingredients of some are listed below for comparison to a few custom mixes...

    Containers..
    Miracle-Gro: 85% - 15% (peat - perlite)
    Fertilome UPM: 85% - 15% (peat - perlite).
    Pro-Mix BX: 85% - 15% (peat - perlite).
    Pro-Mix HP: 75% - 25% (peat - perlite).
    Fafard52: 60% - 30% - 10% (pinebark - peat - perlite)
    5-1-1: 71.4% - 14.3% - 14.3% (pine bark - peat - perlite).
    5-1-1-1: 62.5% - 12.5% - 12.5% -12.5% (pine bark - peat - perlite - calcined clay)
    Gritty Mix: 33% - 33% - 34% (pine bark - ganite grit - calcined clay)
    2-4-1: 28% - 58% -14% (pine bark - peat - calcined clay)

    Sub Irrigated Planters (SIPs)
    BillsFigs: 100% Mushroom Compost
    Miracle-Gro: 85% - 15% (peat - perlite)
    Pro-Mix BX: 85% - 15% (peat - perlite)
    4-2-1-1: 50% - 25% - 12.5% -12.5% (pine bark - peat - perlite - calcined clay)
    2-4-1: 28% - 58% -14% (pine bark - peat - calcined clay)

    Several members have used commercial mixes with added portions of Perlite, Lava Rocks etc. for added aeration and or Manure Compost, Mushroom Compost etc for added nutrients and organic humus.

    Its been my observation that container grown fig trees will grow in almost any medium but will grow faster and healthier in a well aerated mix. I use the custom 5-1-1-1 mix, there are many merits of this mix and with the addition of 1 part Calcined clay the water holding capacity is increased while maintaining the beneficial aeration. The mix is still good (reuseable) after 3 seasons of use. I used the 4-2-1-1 mix successfully last season in SIPs. I plan on trialing 2 new mixes longterm, the 5-1-1-1 mix without peat as mentioned by Al Tapla in one of the discussions and a Gravel - Sand mix which Ive trialed successfully with fig culture.

    Update; 5/1/2018
    My current Potting Mix of Choice is a 2-4-1 ratio of Pine Bark Mulch - Canadian Peat Moss - Calcined Clay (Saf-T-Sorb) for Fig Trees in both SIPs and Containers.



    What is your current potting mix recipe for Containers and or SIPs?

    Links to info on potting mix ingredients...
    http://www.greenhouse.cornell.edu/cr...s/peatlite.pdf
    http://www.turface.com/sites/default...e_brochure.pdf
    http://earthbox.com/earthbox-pdf/EB-...IONS_NEW-2.pdf
    https://earthbox.com/approved-for-earthbox

    Archived discussions on potting [email protected]
    http://figs4funforum.arghchive.com/p...6224__trail_50

    Archived discussions on potting [email protected] GardenWeb
    http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/...444023053.html
    http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/...033011437.html
    http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/...344425812.html
    http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/...131520631.html
    http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/...024623640.html
    http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/...071615772.html

    Originally Posted by Al Tapla,
    The basic soils I use

    The 5-1-1 mix:
    5 parts pine bark fines (partially composted fines are best)
    1 part sphagnum peat (not reed or sedge peat please)
    1-2 parts perlite
    garden lime (or gypsum in some cases)
    controlled release fertilizer (if preferred)

    Big batch;
    3 cu ft pine bark fines
    5 gallons peat
    5 gallons perlite
    2 cups dolomitic (garden) lime (or gypsum in some cases)
    2 cups CRF (if preferred)

    Small batch;
    3 gallons pine bark
    1/2 gallon peat
    1/2 gallon perlite
    4 tbsp lime (or gypsum in some cases)
    1/4 cup CRF (if preferred)

    I have seen advice that some highly organic (practically speaking - almost all container soils are highly organic) container soils are productive for up to 5 years or more. I disagree and will explain why if there is interest. Even if you were to substitute fir bark for pine bark in this recipe (and this recipe will long outlast any peat based soil) you should only expect a maximum of two to three years life before a repot is in order. Usually perennials, including trees (they're perennials too) should be repotted more frequently to insure they can grow at as close to their genetic potential within the limits of other cultural factors as possible. If a soil is desired that will retain structure for long periods, we need to look more to inorganic components. Some examples are crushed granite, fine stone, VERY coarse sand (see above - usually no smaller than BB size in containers, please), Haydite, lava rock (pumice), Turface, calcined DE, and others.

    For long term (especially woody) plantings and houseplants, I use a superb soil that is extremely durable and structurally sound. The basic mix is equal parts of pine bark, Turface, and crushed granite.

    The gritty mix:
    1 part uncomposted screened pine or fir bark (1/8-1/4")
    1 part screened Turface
    1 part crushed Gran-I-Grit (grower size) or #2 cherrystone
    1 Tbsp gypsum per gallon of soil (eliminate if your fertilizer has Ca)
    CRF (if desired)

    I use 1/8 -1/4 tsp Epsom salts (MgSO4) per gallon of fertilizer solution when I fertilize if the fertilizer does not contain Mg (check your fertilizer - if it is soluble, it is probable it does not contain Ca or Mg. If I am using my currently favored fertilizer (I use it on everything), Dyna-Gro's Foliage-Pro in the 9-3-6 formulation, and I don't use gypsum or Epsom salts in the fertilizer solution.
    Last edited by AscPete; 05-09-2018, 09:48 AM. Reason: added update and fixed broken links
    Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

  • #2
    That's a lot of good information in one post, thanks Pete!
    Phil
    Zone 7A - Newark, DE; Zone 8A - Wilmington, NC;

    Comment


    • AscPete
      AscPete commented
      Editing a comment
      You're welcome.
      Its information that's been compiled over years by many fig forum members who have shared their results on the Forums.

  • #3
    Pete, so you are trying a 5-0-1-1 mix, no peat in it?
    Ed
    SW PA zone 6a

    Comment


    • AscPete
      AscPete commented
      Editing a comment
      Its actually a 5-0-1-2,
      2 parts Calcined Clay (5-1-2?), no Peat Moss for a longer life mix.

    • eboone
      eboone commented
      Editing a comment
      would you use that in a SIP or would you not expect wicking without the peat?

    • AscPete
      AscPete commented
      Editing a comment
      It's not planned as a SIP mix, but It could be tested in a SIP.
      It probably wouldn't work due to the decreased soil porosity (wicking ability)

  • #4
    Great and timely info. Much apreciated. I was just browsing through the other day looking for exactly this. I have a few that are ready to pot up and hopefully many more to come soon. .
    Jeff in 6a

    Comment


    • AscPete
      AscPete commented
      Editing a comment
      You're welcome, Good Luck with the up potting.

  • #5
    Thanks for sharing this Pete!
    Your gravel-sand mix sounds interesting?
    Pino, Niagara, Zone 6, WL; variegated figs, breba producers & suggestions welcome
    Breba photos / Main crop fig photos
    Canada Fig Growers

    Comment


    • AscPete
      AscPete commented
      Editing a comment
      I've used a 1-1-1 mix, Coarse sand - Peat - 1/2" gravel topped with Rabbit manure compost which works quite well...
      I'm now trying a 1-1-1 mix , Coarse Sand - 1/2" gravel - Calcined Clay topped with Chicken manure compost.

  • #6
    As some have known for a few years, I use the following for all my containers, including self watering.

    7 parts peat moss
    2 parts Vermiculite
    1 part Perlite
    1/2 part Lime ( either powder or granulated)

    But I have experimented with many mixes that included sand rocks and plain dirt. Figs will grow anywhere and in anything.

    Comment


    • AscPete
      AscPete commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks for sharing your SIP recipe...
      I've made a similar statement often "Figs will grow anywhere and in anything", with the added comment that "the more aerated mixes will yield faster healthier growth".
      Last edited by AscPete; 04-20-2015, 09:10 AM. Reason: Edit Typo

  • #7
    Always interesting to read this kind of information. Even more interesting: the comments, corrections, opinions, suggestions, etc.

    I've been growing containerized fig trees since 2007. The quick-draining mixes work well, but must be watered regularly, especially throughout the summer/high-heat months, and good nutrition must always be provided. Quick-draining mixes are also quick-leaching mixes. Fert's, etc. go right out through the drainage holes with each watering. I guess the addition of some Controlled Release fertilizers would help, and that's why they are mentioned in the recipes listed above.

    Keeping the trees properly watered is my main concern through the dry, high-heat months, and would be a real headache for those who go on trips, vacations, and for those who live in sunny, hot dry-ish climates. Loading a mix with peat moss helps retain moisture but it also breaks down and clogs air spaces within the mix structure, and is not what you want in a quick-draing mixture. Turface-MVP/calcined clay (NAPA AUTO #8822) also retains some moisture, while keeping the mix airy. Irrigation/nutrition is always my concern for my containerized fig trees. However, keeping my few trees properly watered is no big deal, but it would be a real PITA if I had dozens of trees in my collection.

    Wish I knew the answer. Highly organic, water-retentive mixes USUALLY are not good for containerized fig trees, and yet the quick-draining mixes can dry out very quickly... that's why I use "cheater sticks" to tell me what's going on near the roots. My cheap, bamboo "cheater sticks" work, for me. They tell me to water, or, not to water. On many occasions, I thought the mix in the containers would be bone dry but the "cheater stick" told a different tale. The Turface-MVP/calcined clay component holds more moisture than you might think.

    "Cheater Sticks" are a good thing....(Martha Stewart) : )))


    Frank
    Bronx,NYC
    Last edited by BronxFigs; 03-30-2015, 06:12 AM.

    Comment


    • AscPete
      AscPete commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks for commenting and sharing your "cheater sticks"....
      A simple automated drip watering system can allow you to use a fast draining mix and still maintain proper moisture levels. Here's a simple $7.00 system that can water ~ 12 pots, http://www.harborfreight.com/irrigat...kit-46095.html

    • WVMJack
      WVMJack commented
      Editing a comment
      We have added granulated humeric acid to our mix, in agricultural usage, its added at planting to help retain the fertilizer in the soil and keep it from leaching out, to early to tell if its working yet.

    • Figaro176
      Figaro176 commented
      Editing a comment
      Bijan you root prune after they go dormant, right?

  • #8
    Whichever method and mix you choose, if you add fertilizer developed in a farm environment...make sure you give the early starts a shot of gnatrol to inoculate the soil with BTI....favorite food of fungus gnat larvae is callus (pre root) material with a second place of tender roots. I made the mistake of using some old potting mix I had sitting around for a few years in a blend with Pro Mix this year and OMG....I've been fighting the dreaded gnat larvae....BTW...I'm winning
    Ross B. Santa Rosa Calif zone 9b, wish list: CdD Blanc, Igo, Palmata, Sucrette, Morroco, Galicia Negra

    Comment


    • AscPete
      AscPete commented
      Editing a comment
      Fungus Gnats are usually only a problem for cuttings or very young fig trees and are often associated with over watering. For cuttings and trees less than 1 gallon size the recommendation is to use "clean" "sterile" potting mixes and mediums. For trees with established roots fungus gnats are not usually a problem since they live only in the top few inches of soil or mix.

    • rusty hooks
      rusty hooks commented
      Editing a comment
      I must have another variety of nematode...at the bottom of the cup...on the wall....but the gnatrol takes care of them.
      In a shade structure with several different types of plants going at the same time water is in use regularly. Wet ground at the edges of the shade structure is highly suspicious at this point as an origination point. I kept the ground wet at one particular spot all winter long with an experiment....results were good but I may have created a small, flying monster...have never had them before this year. cups I use are 24oz

    • AscPete
      AscPete commented
      Editing a comment
      For wet areas or standing water Mosquito Bit and Mosquito Dunk, http://www.summitchemical.com/mosquito/ works better than Gnatrol, the Mosquito Bits has to be reapplied every 7 - 10 days for newly hatched larvae like Gnatrol, http://www.summitchemical.com/mosquito/mosquito-bits . I sometimes grate the Mosquito Dunk and mix into the surface layer to eliminate Fungus Gnat Larvae. It has the same active ingredient BTi and is encapsulated for slow release. http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/insect/05584.pdf
      Good Luck.
      Last edited by AscPete; 04-19-2015, 08:00 PM. Reason: Typo

  • #9
    I'm in the process of root pruning and up potting several dozen fig trees, some of which I acquired last fall.

    The attached photo is of two bare rooted trees, they are the same cultivar, grown by the same person, but are several years apart in age. The tree on the left is years younger and was planted in a Bark/Peat/Perlite/Calcined Clay mix, the tree on the right was planted in a dense Peat/Sand mix. There is a big difference in root growth between the two plants, the tree on the left in the coarse well aerated fast draining mix has a large volume of fine feeder roots, while the tree on the right has very few feeder roots.
    Click image for larger version

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    Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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    • #10
      Pete, you are the man! This is the best post in the whole forum! Bill's mix is so so heavy! As most folks know, I use SIPs and Bill's pot designs. It's getting to be a bit much for me to mix up my mix b/c I pot up a lot of trees at one time. UPM is not good for SIPs. It does work but it needs mix needs more air.
      Dennis
      Charlotte, NC /Zone 8a

      Comment


      • AscPete
        AscPete commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks...
        I'm currently up potting trees and will post photos of the fig trees in the new 15 Gal SIPs (half 30 gallon barrels) and more aerated mix later today.

      • jmaler
        jmaler commented
        Editing a comment
        Pete, are there any links to how to make 1/2 30 gal barrel SIPs? I've been shopping around my area for barrels and your idea of making them into SIPs sounds like something worth trying.

      • AscPete
        AscPete commented
        Editing a comment
        Jerry,
        I started a new Topic with the SIP info, http://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-ho...or-fig-culture . I will add my actual 30 gallon 1/2 barrel build photos asap.

    • #11
      Pete,

      I'm in the process of bare-rooting / transplanting trees, as well. This is my first time bare-rooting (at least on a large scale) trees grown in fabric containers. I still have a bunch of Superroot Airpots that they are going into. It is about a 4X upgrade in terms of volume which is my comfort zone for moving up. I am finding out that I did not do a good job of screening my material last year. Consequently, the mix was heavy with fine particles and the root systems were not so big as I would had expected.

      I got eight done this past weekend. Only 23 to go, and Sunday is mother's day.
      Littleton, CO (zone 5b) - In Containers
      N.E. of Austin, TX (zone 8b)- In Ground.

      Comment


      • AscPete
        AscPete commented
        Editing a comment
        I've been at it for the past 2 days and I've only got 20 - five gallon buckets completed and still have 30 more to go, not including the three 15 gallon SIPs. Its more work that anticipated, The figs in the 5-1-1-1 mix have filled all the buckets solid with feeder roots, so its been slow work, but half will be gone by the end of summer and the rest only need to be pruned every 2 years.

    • #12
      Thank you so much for this well researched and informative post Pete. You are truly "The Professor".
      I am still using 100% mushroom compost in my Bills Figs SIP's. Yes it is heavy but this really works. It seems to wick very well and the success rates on my SIPs are amazing to me. It is also easy and cheap. After 3 years I root prune heavily and it is almost all roots. I also use the mushroom compost in my 5 gallon sips but mix in some peat and perlite to loosen it up.

      Comment


      • AscPete
        AscPete commented
        Editing a comment
        You're welcome...
        Thanks for the additional info.
        Does your mushroom compost have ingredients and ratios on the label? Most don't. Thanks.

    • #13
      Hello Professor,
      You are right, there are no ratios on the bag. The compost I am using now from Lowes is Harvest Brand Organic Mushroom Compost. The label reads"Harvest mushroom Soil is regionally formulated from materials derived from one or more of the following:Mushroom Compost.
      When you buy a pot from Bill's Figs he just puts the compost in a garbage bag. He told me that he buys it in bulk locally. I can't argue with his success

      Comment


      • AscPete
        AscPete commented
        Editing a comment
        I separated the Lowes Mushroom Compost in a 32 oz water bath and filtered the sediments...
        It consists of ~ 75% - 80% identifiable partially composted wood mulch, with the remaining portion being a 50/50 mix of fine silt and granular mineral.

      • hoosierbanana
        hoosierbanana commented
        Editing a comment
        Interesting, it probably came from "synthetic" Shiitake "logs" then, could also be Oyster, Enoki or Maitake. Most mushroom compost is generated from button and Portobello mushrooms, which use composted straw and is mostly humus after composting again.

      • Coop
        Coop commented
        Editing a comment
        Nice work professor. Really appreciate your research. Thanks

    • #14
      This is the best post ever. Wish I had seen it 6 months ago. I am going to try some worm castings in my mix.

      Comment


      • AscPete
        AscPete commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks...
        and Good luck.
        What's your current potting mix?
        Last edited by AscPete; 05-05-2015, 09:03 PM. Reason: added Question.

    • #15
      Awesome post Pete! I find myself reading this post so many times over and over. I use to make my own mix until I found myself spending too much time making it for so many trees! This year, I stopped and now use Wallace Farm Soil products. This year, I will try their Mushroom compost in SWPs. I just picked up 40 bags. It takes about 3 - 1cu. ft. bags to repot one tree inside one 27g pot. One Cubic foot equates to around 7.5 gallons. That's a lot of crap for one tree!
      Dennis
      Charlotte, NC /Zone 8a

      Comment


      • #16
        Dennis,
        Thanks.
        Bass of Trees of Joy orders bulk quantities of pre-mixed custom potting mix from a large nursery and its delivered in a Multi-Cubic Yard bag ( 3 or 4 Cu.Yd.).

        I actually purchased 2 bags and separated a sample of Coop's recommended Mushroom Compost, Lowes Harvest Brand Organic...
        It was mostly partially composted wood mulch (75% to 80% by volume), but it has lots of large particles so it should be well aerated initially.
        Click image for larger version

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        I will be testing it in a 5 gallon SIP and also in a regular pot with some added Calcined Clay (~20%).
        Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

        Comment


        • #17
          Hey Pete,
          If I use that 4 inch black drain flex tubing in the bottom of my pots, will the weight of my soil crush it? I'm following the pics you posted last year using that flex tubing.
          Dennis
          Charlotte, NC /Zone 8a

          Comment


          • AscPete
            AscPete commented
            Editing a comment
            If the pipe is laid on its side it has an extremely high weight loading, a 1ft section can easily support over 100lbs with minimal deflection. It was designed to to buried under several feet of soil.

            When placed on end it has more deflection, but it will not collapse under weight

        • #18
          Dennis,
          I've never had a problem using drainage pipe, but you can do a simple test to prove it to yourself.
          3 cu ft of the Harvest Mushroom compost is ~ 90 lbs. (its shipped damp).

          As a test cut the drainage pipe into pieces the designed length that you need, place them on a hard surface with a piece of plywood on top as a platform, add weights, bags of cement, blocks or just carefully stand on the wood measure the deflection.

          Just tried it quickly with six (6) 4" long pieces... there was less than ~ 1/4" deflection (compression) at 100 lbs and ~ 1/2' deflection at 150 lbs. Also the center "wick" will create an additional support column.
          Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

          Comment


          • #19
            This may have been answered someplace before but if the goal here is fast healthy growth why not just grow in coco coir? You get hydroponics like growth possibly with the added benefit of less up potting or faster up potting to the largest size. For instance 1 gallon of coco is the same as growing in 3 gallon of dirt. coco holds moisture well too.
            You would probably just need coco , perlite and maybe some pea gravel to add some weight and of course your preferred nutrients.
            The downside is you will want to get to the next size pots as quickly as possible. The growth that each container can hold is much more than normal.
            For instance, last fall I had a cherry tomato growing in my compost pile that put out huge cherry tomatoes. They were also the best cherry tomatoes I have ever had. Several friends also tried them and couldnt believe how good they were so I took a cutting to overwinter in the house in hopes that I could grow it again this year. Not only did it take off in a 5 quart container but it had multiple shoots that ran 10-12 ft long. It was a huge mess and nothing I ever expected in a few months of growth. Needless to say I got plenty of cuttings off of it. .
            So why wouldnt this work with figs? I have plenty of cuttings rooted or rooting so I could do an experiment unless there's a good reason why this wouldnt work.
            Jeff in 6a

            Comment


            • #20
              Jeff,
              I've only used Coir for the past 2 years and have trialed it as a replacement for Peat and in drip hydroponic mixes at different ratios. Its been successful but hasn't been in use long term as a growing medium for figs. From some accounts its used for fig culture in Malaysia.

              Here are some pics of a few trees in their first year of growth with Coco Coir as the main potting mix ingredient. The first 2 pics are Tissue Cultured trees the last 2 are cuttings.
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              Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

              Comment


              • #21
                Did you use straight coco or was this part of your 5-1-1-1 mix? That looks like good growth for 1 year.
                Jeff in 6a

                Comment


                • AscPete
                  AscPete commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I've not used it at 100% but have made mixes including substituting it for Peat in a 5-1-1-1 mix. I've also used it at 50/50 ratio with Peat in some recipes. The following are some Coir recipes that have worked;
                  1-1 Coir - Clay Pellets
                  1-1 Coir - Perlite
                  1-1 Coir - Pine Bark Fines
                  1-1-1 Coir - Pine Bark Fines - Clay Pellets
                  1-1-1 Coir - Pine Bark Fines - Perlite
                  And I've also tried mixes with added 1 part Calcined Clay to all the above recipes. The Pine Bark Fines and Perlite were sifted to remove particles smaller than 1/16" and larger than 1/2". For Coir mixes the Calcium and Magnesium was supplied by adding Gypsum and Epsom Salt instead of Dolemite Limestone to the mix.

              • #22
                what does SIP stand for again? My brain is not working this morning

                Comment


              • #23
                My current potting mix of choice;

                For SIPs a custom 2-4-1 ratio mix of Pine Bark fines - Peat Moss - Calcined Clay (Tractor Supply's) with the following per each 5 gallons of mix, 1 cup each Dolemite Limestone (Calcium, Magnesium and pH increase), Espoma Garden-tone (for beneficial microbes) and 1/2 cup Ironite (for micro nutrients) as the basic starter potting mix (fertilizers and additives were added as needed per fertilizing schedules). Attached are photos of the mix used in SIP's this past season.

                For Containers its still the 5-1-1-1 ratio mix of Pine Bark Fines - Peat Moss - Perlite - Calcined Clay (tractor Supply's) with the following per each 5 gallons of mix, 1 cup each Dolemite Limestone and Espoma Garden-tone (for beneficial microbes) and 1/2 cup Ironite (for micro nutrients) as the basic potting mix (fertilizers and additives were added as needed per fertilizing schedules). Attached are photos of the mix used in a 5 gallon bucket to "Direct Root" a fig cutting this past season. The cutting was planted in the bucket of pre-watered mix near the end of May and placed on an open porch for most of the season.
                You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 5 photos.
                Last edited by AscPete; 11-14-2015, 01:58 PM. Reason: typo
                Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

                Comment


                • Vladimir
                  Vladimir commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Pete, for containers, do you sieve the clay and bark to obtain certain size ranges?

                • AscPete
                  AscPete commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Vladimir ,
                  For Potting Mix I only sift the Pine Bark not the Calcined Clay...
                  The Calcined Clay is sifted with a window screen to remove dust only when making Cutting Mix.

                  The Pine Bark is sifted through 1/2" hardware cloth and the fines are removed with 1/4" hardware cloth, the resulting sifted bark is 1/2" thru 1/4" sized.

                  The smaller fines are mixed with the Peat portion of the potting mix recipe, this results in a potting mix that will always have the same composition and consistency for every batch.

                  The 3 cu ft bags of Agway Pine Bark Mulch are usually approximately 0.6 cu ft of "actual fines" and 2.4 cu. ft of "sifted Pine Bark". The Calcined Clay is usually approximately 5% dust when sifted. I no longer "sift" when making potting mix, just break up the larger chunks of Pine Bark by grating through the 1/2" hardware cloth and from experience I can now "judge" the particle size of the materials to determine if sifting is necessary.

              • #24
                Perfect timing Pete! I just tried making the 4-1-1-1 (pine bark, coir-perlite-calcined clay) mix as per your recommendations to try out on a few of my cuttings. I was a little worried about the pine bark because there are a few of those "matchstick" looking pieces of wood in there. Does the pic below look about right for the mix (particle size wise)?
                Attached Files
                WL: Moro Di Caneva, Fracazanno Multicolore, Dels Ermitans, a nice spread somewhere in California that has the wasp! 😉
                My Plant Inventory: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...HZcBjcsxMwQ7iY
                Cuttings & Rooted Cuttings Available 2020: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...ifj96TTnQNCahc

                Comment


                • #25
                  Jamie,
                  What brand Pine Bark Mulch did you use? It looks like composted wood not bark. It may work, but it doesn't look like Pine Bark.

                  Attached is a photo of sifted Agway's Pine Bark Mulch that sold in 3 cu ft bags. @ Agways in the NE. Its sifted through 1/2 inch hardware cloth to remove the large chunks then through 1/8 inch mesh to remove the dust, it has very few slivers of visible wood. The other photo is the hydrated Plant It Coir mix. A 3 cu ft bag yields almost 2 cu ft of usable material.
                  You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 3 photos.
                  Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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                  • AscPete
                    AscPete commented
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                    Haven't heard of the specific product, but other members have posted that bark fines used in 'Soil Conditioners' are sometimes the right stuff, Pine Bark Fines or Pine Bark Mulch, it should look like bark not mulched wood. Good luck

                  • AscPete
                    AscPete commented
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                    Agway store locator, http://www.agway.com/StoreLocations/...hAddress=19019

                  • Jamie0507
                    Jamie0507 commented
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                    Yes the MG bark fines looks a lot more like bark, and what I see in the pic you posted.. The only difference is the color.. It's almost black.. Thanks for the agway link too Pete, looks like I have 5 within a 20 mile radius Maybe I'll get lucky & find it there. Thanks a bunch for all your guidance with everything, I really do appreciate it 😁
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