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  • Col de Dame Blanc

    I was considering planting my CDDB in ground. Will it produce and ripen figs if froze to ground level? My tree is still small but when it gets bigger is when I would plant it. I have four more prime places for fig trees and I don't want to waste the real estate on a tree that won't give me figs if top froze.
    Wishlist; Green Michurinska, St. Rita
    Tony
    Sarver, PA Zone 6A.

  • #2
    If you use a low limb technique or especially Pete's low cordon technique, both shown at the link, you might meet with good success.
    Could've done it a week ago but today brushed aside the leaves covering low running limbs of Hardy Chicago, Ronde de Bordeaux, Natalina (Mt Etna), and Salem Dark,
    Tony WV 6b
    https://mountainfigs.net/

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    • #3
      What zone are you? CdD blanc is about 2 weeks behind CdD Noir leafing out in my greenhouse. Also, they ripen late so don't put in ground unless you have a warm start to autumn.
      Rafael
      Zone 7b, Queens, New York

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      • #4
        I agree with Rafael - probably not a good candidate for growing in-ground in Pennsylvania because it needs a very long season to ripen properly. In a container (or greenhouse) you can get an earlier start.
        Steve
        D-i-c-k-e-r-s-o-n, MD; zone 7a
        WL: Verdolino, Figue Jaune, Nantes Maroc, Lussheim

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        • #5
          According to the Zone map I'm in zone 6a but I think in reality it's 5b. Although these past few winters have been like 5a. I sort of figured that CdDB would be a late fig but thought there might of been a chance that others were able to ripen them. So much for wishful thinking. There is still the problem of what to put in those places. I would like to have something other than Hardy Chicago which I have one in ground and a few others in pots. A LaRadek's BT will eventually go in one area. I'm open for suggestions for the other 3 fig spots.
          @ Tony. The Low Limb technique looks to be promising for my area. I'll have to give a try on my RDB.
          Wishlist; Green Michurinska, St. Rita
          Tony
          Sarver, PA Zone 6A.

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          • #6
            The top 5 in-ground figs that I would plant in cold areas: Marseilles Black, Florea, Improved Celeste, Ronde de Bordeaux, and Malta Black.

            These five distinct figs seem to be among the earliest ripening possible, the most productive, the most hardy and/or most robust under difficult zone conditions.

            My understanding (though I don't know firsthand) is that BT's main crops are not among the most early ripening.

            By Marseilles Black, I mean Marseilles Black or any other especially early and productive Mt Etna strain. Though I consider Hardy Chicago to be a Mt Etna, it has not performed especially well for me compared to other Mt Etna strains.
            Tony WV 6b
            https://mountainfigs.net/

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            • #7
              My Col de Dame Blanc is in Ground in Zone 8A. This year is the third leaf for my little tree. It is more prone to winter damage than other fig trees I have, but does come back by forming new shoots from the lower portion of the branches. So far it is growing like a shrub as the top two thirds of most shoots got killed during the past two winters.
              The tree was covered by foam insulation this past winter and the result was the same as last year when it was totally exposed.
              It is a 10 on the tasting scale but is a late fig here in Texas. Not sure how it would behave in zone 6.
              Last edited by Sas; 04-16-2015, 01:27 AM.
              Sas North Austin, TX Zone 8B

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