X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Osborn Prolific

    Any particular thoughts on Osborn Prolific, aka, apparently, Neveralla, Archipel, Rust? Ripens to a kind of pink skin here, though purple or bronze elsewhere. First year ripening here. Impressed with its nice light flavor, and dense pulp, and good size for a dark fig, also relatively early ripening. Not productive yet here on a small tree. Kind of a sweet caramel flavor. Has somewhat similar features as Improved Celeste while being larger, rounder, and later ripening but far from late.

    Osborn Prolific has been found to be genetically similar to figs from Turkmenistan, a group of figs that “may represent non-Mediterranean type wild figs found in the Hyrcanic regions of the south Caspian Sea, which some botanists treat as a separate species, F. hyrcana (Zhukovsky 1962). Both Mediterranean and non-Mediterranean wild figs are fully interfertile and produce hybrids that are adapted to a wide range of ecological conditions (Storey and Condit 1969)” Figs “from Turkmenistan are somewhat genetically different from the rest of the Mediterranean and the Caucasus figs” (Aradhya, et al).

    Seems to have been available in the US especially in the Pacific Northwest for awhile. I wonder why we don't hear more about it.
    Tony WV 6b
    https://mountainfigs.net/

  • #2
    I've got one I called Osbourne Not Prolific because it stayed so little so long. Started in March of last year, was about six inches when I brought it out this year, now it's got figs that might even ripen and sending out new branches. I've got a new respect for it.
    Cheryl (f/k/a VeryNew2Figs) Zone 5a/6a
    What I'm growing: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...it?usp=sharing

    Comment


    • #3
      I have not seen the tree but have picked up a basket of it at farmers market. The figs I got were reasonably ripe but mild in flavor.
      Los Angeles, CA, zone 10b

      Comment


      • #4

        Even with the perfect growing conditions here, which include the wasp, my second year Osborne Prolific is completely absent of any flavor. The experience might be akin to eating a glob of juicy corn starch... you know that you have something of substance in your mouth, but there is not any taste to speak of.

        So..... my tree is soon to become rootstock for a variety that is worth the irrigation water to keep it alive.
        "May you sit under your own fig tree..." This metaphor, in use since Solomon, is a wish for the receiver's spirit to know peace, for their family to be secure, and for their life to be fruitful.

        Comment


        • #5
          Wow - talk about different experiences. When I first started selling fig trees I sold a ton of Osborn Prolific and here in N. Va.they were very popular - so much so that folks kept paying me absurd prices for my older trees. I still have problems keeping them in stock.
          Great flavor for both Osborn Prolific and Dr..Osborn.

          Comment


          • #6
            We do have different weather. How long ago was that?
            Los Angeles, CA, zone 10b

            Comment


            • #7
              I never tried growing Osborn's Prolific in Waddell, AZ because the California Rare Fruit Growers Fig Fruit Facts page says it would not do well in a hot, desert climate like ours: Osborn's Prolific (Arachipel, Neveralla) Medium to large, skin is dark reddish brown, flesh amber, often tinged pink. Very sweet, best fresh. Light breba crop. Tree upright, bare, will grow in shade. Ripens late. Only for north coast, Pacific Northwest. Poor in warm climates. https://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/fig.html
              Christine (Waddell, AZ Zone 9b) Wishlist: All my fig wishes have been fulfilled by OurFigs members. Thank you!

              Comment


              • #8
                Click image for larger version

Name:	102_0846 Neveralla rich, sweet  9-21-11 copy.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	124.3 KB
ID:	188344 Neveralla has the reputation of being bland - and it is - until it is dead ripe. Then it's one of the best figs around.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Is it a honey/sugar type of fig? Does it have the caramel flavor like mountainfig has? Which other fig would you compare it with in the best category?
                  Los Angeles, CA, zone 10b

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have heard the completely different opinions about this fig for awhile.

                    It is always either great, or rootstock. No inbetween. I have one growing, but have not had one yet, holding out.

                    Mike

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Very informative comments above, thanks.

                      Anyone with more experience with Osborn Prolific? Must be some growers in the Pacific northwest who have been ripening this fig for years.
                      Tony WV 6b
                      https://mountainfigs.net/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Visually it the interior looks a lot like a more honey filled Improved Celeste. Does it taste similar, Tony?
                        Ross - Zone 7A - Philadelphia
                        My Figs! / Facebook / YouTube

                        Comment


                        • mountainfigs
                          mountainfigs commented
                          Editing a comment
                          This could be, metaphorically speaking, Improved Celeste's bolder, bigger, more bulbous kin. More dense, or thick in pulp, and maybe more smooth flavor, if that makes sense. Very reminiscent of Improved Celeste, though different somewhat all around, more exaggerated in most ways. However, it is later ripening, if not late, and has not been as prolific for me as IC. Both have skins that tend to be pink but can range to purplish, or brown or rust. Osborn Prolific is also apparently known also as Rust.

                      • #13
                        I believe Charles P and Ben B were growing the heck of this in the PNW. And they love them.... Maybe something that does well in very specific conditions?

                        I tried rooting some cuttings last year and they all rooted like crazy.... then promptly rotted away and died...
                        Guildwood Village - Toronto, Canada - Zone 6

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          I love my O.P.! Produces well after heavy dormant pruning. Suckers very heavily. Shared a couple hundred cuttings @$1.00 ea to F4F friends. They are not prone to splitting. Not as sweet or juicy as Desert King.
                          -Charles P. aka TahomaGuy2

                          Comment


                          • TorontoJoe
                            TorontoJoe commented
                            Editing a comment
                            I was waiting for you to chime in...

                          • Rickyv101
                            Rickyv101 commented
                            Editing a comment
                            I got 2 cuttings from you, With my poor rooting skill, I got one rooted now, I hope that it grows well next year with some sweet fig.

                            My brother has one 10+ years old fig tree, It looks quick close to Osborn Prolific, It might be OP or it is Vern's Brown turkey.
                            I took a sucker from his tree last year, It has small crop of brebas, Then a big main crop, However, figs is sweet before Sep/15, After that, they are blanded.
                            Last edited by Rickyv101; 10-08-2017, 01:10 PM.

                        • #15
                          I have Osborne Prolific and I am really liking it. This is a fig that I was not very impressed with the first two years it ripened fruit. It was mildly sweet, and tender, but not much else. I even wolf packed with Doug about what a nothing fig it was. Like Doug, I was going to use it as a grafting mule for more promising varieties. I am glad I was lazy and never got around to it. This year it is one of the more enjoyable figs I have ripened.

                          This year the flavor is much more complicated. I would describe it as sweet and tender with a caramel flavor, but with a melon flavor in the background. The caramel hits first, then transitions to the melon flavor that lingers after the fig is gone. Caramel Melon sounds really weird, but it works and is really refreshing.

                          I am sure the flavor is not for everyone. I usually gravitate to intense berry figs with some acid bite to them, but this fig is so different from all my others, that is has earned a long term status in my orchard.

                          I was talking to Gary about this fig and he also has a favorable impression of it. He had one for a while before gophers removed it for him.

                          I do think it must like more moderate climates because it did really well for Gary and it is doing really well for me. We are in 9a and we have some marine influence that cools us down almost every evening. Clearly it does not like the heat of the central valley as confirmed by Doug.

                          Comment


                          • #16
                            This is a website I would highly recommend,especially for European varieties,it is called Figues du Monde,they have an extensive collection and pictures and information on many figs including this one,the site is in French but I used google website translate,please see Osborne Prolific below:

                            https://translate.googleusercontent....xzSmXMeqhJlvPA

                            And in the original French:

                            https://figuesdumonde.wordpress.com/...born-prolific/

                            here's their full variety list(in French)

                            https://figuesdumonde.wordpress.com/

                            i just copy the link for the variety I'm interested into the search box here by variety as if you input the main variety page it tends to translate the French names which is just confusing

                            http://itools.com/tool/google-transl...age-translator
                            Haroon,Birmingham U.K,Zone 8ish
                            W/L: LSU Tiger, I258, Smith, Granthams Royal, Gayet,De Tres Esplets, Campaniere,Moscatel Preto,Cavalliere,CdDG

                            Comment


                            • davlast
                              davlast commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Thierry Demarquest is a great connoisseur of fig trees. I have an order for next month

                            • crademan
                              crademan commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Love the photo from figuesdumonde.wordpress.com: https://figuesdumonde.files.wordpres...3226.jpg?w=620

                              It shows a beautifully cared for fig orchard -- clean and sanitary with no visible places for bugs to breed.

                          • #17
                            Originally posted by davlast View Post
                            Thierry Demarquest is a great connoisseur of fig trees. I have an order for next month
                            he certainly has the recognition in the European fig community,the site is great for ID,fig background and history,I just wish he would add more photos and background pages.I haven't ordered from him yet but may do this winter.

                            Back on topic,I have Osborne Prolific but it's new to my collection,in pot not in ground,this year so will add pics when I get some figs

                            Haroon,Birmingham U.K,Zone 8ish
                            W/L: LSU Tiger, I258, Smith, Granthams Royal, Gayet,De Tres Esplets, Campaniere,Moscatel Preto,Cavalliere,CdDG

                            Comment


                            • Elruge
                              Elruge commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Hi Haroon,
                              Moved to this forum following the demise of the other site. Looks to be a good one, much less combative. Haven't seen Vinny here yet. Wonder if he will join.

                          • #18
                            Originally posted by Elruge View Post
                            Hi Haroon,
                            Moved to this forum following the demise of the other site. Looks to be a good one, much less combative. Haven't seen Vinny here yet. Wonder if he will join.
                            Good to see you over here!.I dunno if Vinny is a member,he didn't spend much time in F4F of late,he focuses more on his Facebook Group 'European Figs'
                            Haroon,Birmingham U.K,Zone 8ish
                            W/L: LSU Tiger, I258, Smith, Granthams Royal, Gayet,De Tres Esplets, Campaniere,Moscatel Preto,Cavalliere,CdDG

                            Comment


                            • #19
                              Hey, Charles 👋. My Osborn Prolific I got from you early last year is growing nicely now. It still has those same nine figs on them I mentioned in Post 2 just kind of sitting there, but I've got my fingers crossed that they'll ripen. You just helped me decide another plant to put in one of my few big pots. It's still in a 2.5 gallon bucket.
                              Cheryl (f/k/a VeryNew2Figs) Zone 5a/6a
                              What I'm growing: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...it?usp=sharing

                              Comment


                              • #20
                                I got my Neveralla in 2007 for use in a project. I was aware of it's reputation for being excellent - and just the opposite - a dud. When it fruited, it was phenomenal. I had a rating system that went from "poor" to "excellent". That fig blew right past "excellent", and made it necessary to add a new category - "WOW". I actually said wow - twice - while eating it. It started out with a nice rich sweetness, then a series of other flavors chased each other over my tongue. The taste was so complex and deep that I can't even describe it. I contacted Gene Hosey, my source for the fig, and asked why it had such mixed reviews. He said that for the best flavor to develop, the fig had to be super-ripe. So on the positive side is this incredible taste, and as Fighead mentioned above, it is very resistant to splitting.

                                But growing it well in pots isn't easy. This fig seems to suck micronutrients out of pots - then develops deficiency symptoms and stalls. I have a lot of figs, and rotate commercial fertilizers through an injector. Most of my figs tolerate this situation, and seem content - not Neveralla. Organic growers, or in-ground growers might have better luck as it seems to need constant replenishment of nutrients. If it isn't growing well, the figs are dull and dark with a greenish yellow under-tone, the skin is thick and doesn't beggar cape, and taste is nonexistent. When it is well grown the figs glow, the skin is thin, forming cracks, and the taste is amazing - but let it get really, really, ripe.

                                Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC05183 edited Neveralla breba 8-6-14 copy.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	182.0 KB
ID:	202611



                                Comment


                                • grasshopper
                                  grasshopper commented
                                  Editing a comment
                                  What other figs do you like in your area?

                                • fignut
                                  fignut commented
                                  Editing a comment
                                  Sorry grasshopper, I didn't see your comment until now. I give high marks to figs that are early, and produce without a lot of drama - Hardy Chicago (and family), Florea, Ronde de Bordeaux - but I like them all, lol. Add Italian Honey to the short list.
                                  Last edited by fignut; 10-11-2017, 10:43 AM. Reason: Added fig

                                • Rickyv101
                                  Rickyv101 commented
                                  Editing a comment
                                  Thanks for sharing this information growing them in pot, I am at PNW with cooler summer, I like its fig too, Ants love it as well due to its thin skin, I am thinking to put it in ground.

                              • #21
                                I am a fan of Neveralla! easy to grow, healthy and produces many nice looking brebas and figs and ripens with time to spare.
                                Last edited by Pino; 10-10-2017, 09:43 PM.
                                Pino, Niagara, Zone 6, WL; variegated figs, breba producers & suggestions welcome
                                Breba photos / Main crop fig photos

                                Comment


                                • #22
                                  In my post above I mentioned that " the figs are dull and dark with a greenish yellow under-tone, the skin is thick and doesn't beggar cape, and taste is nonexistent. When it is well grown the figs glow, the skin is thin, forming cracks, and the taste is amazing - but let it get really, really, ripe." Here is a picture of what I meant:

                                  Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC09299     edited Neveralla - left, tasteless - right good 10-10-19 copy.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	175.8 KB
ID:	204261

                                  The fig on the left will be tasteless, the one on the right good - with the potential to be great if allowed to get really ripe. I should also have mentioned that there is a shape difference the good figs tend to be much rounder than the poor figs.

                                  Comment


                                  • #23
                                    I have Osborn and the first year I thought it was rather unremarkable. I had it on the chopping block. This year planning to get rid of it, i tasted the first ripe fig and wow! Very good, rich honey like flavor, maybe caramel to some. So now I'm super glad I let it fruit again. it has a beautiful growth habit too, Mine is tree form with three scaffolds. A for sure keeper for my tastes, but the tree needs to mature for optimal flavor.

                                    Comment


                                    • #24
                                      I obtained a Dave Wilson Nursery Osborne Prolific a couple of years ago and put it in a half wine barrel container. It produced a couple of figs that were surprisingly good. Early this year it went into the ground and took off and delivered its prolific figs that were excellent in flavor! It is tree shaped with a long trunk and a nice canopy. Does not have any suckers and just keeps on producing from the past couple of months and still going strong. It is also in a cool coastal and windy climate Ca. zone 9b.

                                      Comment


                                      • #25
                                        Neveralla does very well here in the Pacific NW. My neighbor has a tree planted in the ground and he describes the taste as excellent and the tree as a must-have. He gave me a rooted cutting.
                                        Did you enter your data in the Fig ripening Calculator?: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...zD4/edit#gid=0

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X