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  • Use of cinnamon as antibacterial?

    Newbie to this forum just recently. I have mainly been lurking, but figured I should ask first before doing. I recently started some various fig cuttings, using another forum members method of starting them in clear cups. Most have started pushing new leaves and look healthy, but my Marseilles Black VS, has some light fungal or bacterial spots on tops of the cuttings, and have been the slowest to root. I was planning to clean them with either a bleach or hydrogen peroxide solution like I have read in other posts, but was thinking about applying some cinnamon powder to these areas afterwards like you do with orchids. Does anyone have any thoughts or tried this with figs?
    Andre
    Western Orange County, FL

  • #2
    cinnamon is always a good additive to a potassium bicarb spray for powdery mildew....no reason to believe it wouldn't have the same effect here...BTW...I just recently treated a "very special" cutting for the same problem with a 1-4 solution of 3% hydrogen peroxide....excellent results and the "special, papas" cutting is rooting nicely....
    Ross B. Santa Rosa Calif zone 9b, wish list: CdD Blanc, Igo, Palmata, Sucrette, Morroco, Galicia Negra

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    • Taverna78
      Taverna78 commented
      Editing a comment
      I can't wait to see it!

  • #3
    I use cinnamon before for couple reason. It has helped with trees/cuttings that are sick and also helps recover "light" root rot. But also it is a natural repellant for fungas gnats. They can't stand the smell of it I understand.
    Zone 5 Chicago IL Wish list:
    1) Rest peacfully Amico Bello Buddy 👼🏼.
    2) This weeks ebay auctions.

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    • #4
      Thanks for the replies, I will post any results or problems if I experience any
      Andre
      Western Orange County, FL

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      • #5
        i have used it with great results on my orchids and it is what a large renown orchid grower here uses. You can buy a large container at Sams club. Joyce

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        • #6
          I note that your question had to do with anti-bacterial properties of cinnamon. Antifungal properties are well known, but I haven't heard about antibacterial effects.
          Dale

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          • #7
            I believe what I was seeing was fungal mycelium. Although, antibacterial was the incorrect wording, I was essentially asking if anyone had experienced any adverse effects from applying it to fig stems or laminas.
            Andre
            Western Orange County, FL

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