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  • Rooting cuttings using an idea I got from forum

    Mountainfigs, a forum member, revealed in another thread the idea of rooting multiple cuttings in a single container. I thought I'd give it a try since it'ts the method I use to start tomato and pepper seeds using a peat based potting mix, except for the cups. In this case with dormant fig cuttings I mixed 50% perlite.

    These were done several days ago and are already showing signs of growth. Individual cups can be removed as needed.



    You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 1 photos.
    Jerry, Canyon Lake TX 8b

  • #2
    Good luck!
    Calvin, Wish list is to finish working on the new house, someday.
    Bored? Grab a rake, paint roller, or a cordless drill and come over!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by jmaler View Post
      Mountainfigs, a forum member, revealed in another thread the idea of rooting multiple cuttings in a single container. I thought I'd give it a try since it'ts the method I use to start tomato and pepper seeds using a peat based potting mix, except for the cups. In this case with dormant fig cuttings I mixed 50% perlite.

      These were done several days ago and are already showing signs of growth. Individual cups can be removed as needed.


      Hi Jerry,

      That wasn't my idea, though I do recall someone mentioning it recently on the forum. I never root multiple cuttings in a single container (or almost never). I would worry about the roots getting entwined and possibly breaking when trying to untangle. I did mention recently having good simple success with using plastic cups on one (3 node) cutting per gallon container of potting mix.
      Tony WV 6b
      https://mountainfigs.net/

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      • #4
        Sorry Tony. At 72, these days there is just too many gray cells in the old noggin.

        I plan to grow out the cuttings until they have ample feeder root growth, the little brown roots. I have untangled tomato and pepper roots by pumping up and down in a bucket of water and gently pulling apart.
        Jerry, Canyon Lake TX 8b

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        • #5
          Just grow them together. Would be a great center piece trees especially if they are different cultivars with different color fruit. Eventually the trucks well grow together and make one tree.
          Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

          “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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          • drphil69
            drphil69 commented
            Editing a comment
            I like the idea but the vigor of the trees would need to be similar, otherwise the lower vigor trees may die off.

          • COGardener
            COGardener commented
            Editing a comment
            It's no different than multi budded stone fruits for example. I simply prune the cultivars with less vigour to keep the tree more balanced. I also orentate the lower vigor cultivars to the southwest so they get more sun.

        • #6
          I have done it last year . Had a good success but a huge mess of roots too. I would suggest to wait until they are established or even dormant to do the separation.
          After I separated mine (3 in a 3 gal pot), they all dropped the leaves and looked terrible. I felt so bad. In a few weeks they kicked back and everything was re grown. Some delay but ended fine. Make sure not to overwater if the same happened to you too.
          Good luck!
          USDA z 10a, SoCal. WL: De la Roca, Raspberry Tart, Boysenberry Blush

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          • #7
            Dormant - excellent idea!
            Jerry, Canyon Lake TX 8b

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            • #8
              Here are the guys I posted pic of in the 1st post 5 days later. In the big pots are JH Adriatic, Smith and LSU Gold. I tried starting a single JH Adriatic in a cup. Both methods bypass the sphagnum moss step. Hopefully I won't need to deal with the small new white roots breaking off.

              Started removing cups several days ago.
              You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 2 photos.
              Jerry, Canyon Lake TX 8b

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              • #9
                Jerry,
                Most of the direct plant methods bypass the pre-rooting step.
                Here's a simple individual direct plant method, http://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-ho...rooting-method . I've been recommending it because it incorporates the " humidity weaning" process into the steps. Good Luck.

                BTW, I've bare rooted and separated actively growing fig trees with little damage using that water bath method, http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox....9&postcount=39 but as Greenfig mentioned the roots should be hardened (established) before they are separated.
                Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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