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  • Anyone use mycorrhizae?

    Has anyone used mycorrhizae in their soil with results? I don't see how it couldn't work for figs. I never really hear anyone talk about it with figs.
    Proudly Serving in the United States Armed Forces, 2009-2017
    Everyone should have a green thumb

  • #2
    I have been using it for a couple of years. I can't say I've noticed any special improvement or benefit. Willis Orchards actually pushes a packet of mycorrizhae on its fig customers!
    Rafael
    Zone 10b, Miami, FL

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    • #3
      Jarrett,
      Welcome to Our Figs forum community.

      I have never used products that are sold as Mycorrhizae only, but many members of F4F have posted on their use.

      I use Espoma Organic Fertilizers, http://www.espoma.com/products/organic-plant-foods/ that have added "Bio-Tone", http://www.espoma.com/wp-content/upl...iotoneplus.pdf which is a blend of several Beneficial Bacteria and Mycorrhizae Fungi along with the Organic Fertilizer. I'm currently using Bio-tone Starter, Garden-tone and Tomato-tone to provide balanced fertilizer from 1 gallon rooted cuttings to fruiting trees. Since the soil microbes are needed to breakdown soil nutrients for plants to absorb they are beneficial in potted fig culture.

      Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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      • #4
        I use Pro-Mix BX with Mycorrhizae. It's all I've used. I've had good results but I have nothing else to compare to.
        Frank ~ zone 7a VA

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        • #5
          I use Espoma -Tone products to fertilize which have inoculants and usually toss in compost to my planting holes/potting mix. Can't say one way or the other if it helps, but it certainly can't hurt!
          https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
          SE PA
          Zone 6

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          • #6
            Glomus mosseae and Glomus intraradices have been shown to work with Ficus carica. AscPete will be by momentarily with the citations. There's 1 Glomus species that helps grapes fight root knot nematodes.
            Bob C.
            Kansas City, MO Z6

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            • #7
              Interesting. I need to give it try next time.
              Proudly Serving in the United States Armed Forces, 2009-2017
              Everyone should have a green thumb

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              • #8
                I use Pro-Mix BX with Mycorrhizae, it seems ok but not sure if better or worse than other products, good luck.
                Shailesh, Pennsylvania, ZONE 6B

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                • #9
                  We discussed the use of mycorrhizae and I tried some brands on my roses when I was active in the rose show circles. I didn't particularly notice a difference. One person had actually reported killing their roses with one brand of mycorrhizae. All mycorrhizael fungi are not the same. If you're going to use it, make sure it comes from a reliable source. Here is an article on it:
                  Mara, Southern California,
                  Climate Zone: 1990=9b 2012= 10a 2020=?

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                  • #10
                    Mycorrhizae has received a lot of press in the last 5 years. Its beneficial capabilities are substantial but that is only half the story.

                    Mycorrhizae is a naturally occurring, 470 million year old series of fungi that physically penetrate the roots of a suitable host plant. This penetration establishes a symbiotic relationship to the benefit of both plant and fungus. The plant receives water and nutrients from the fine fungus filaments and the fungus receives food from the effects of photosynthesis from the plant.

                    Mycorrhizae is very fragile and is essentially destroyed with mechanical tilling. The use of fungicide drenches prevent its continued colonization and the use of hot and spicy fertilizers also have a negative effect. These 3 practices need to be modified before you can expect any significant performance improvement.

                    There are many, many different strains of Mycorrhizae and one host plant may have multiple strains working at different times of the year in different growing conditions. Check the lable of your chosen Mycorrhizae product and you may find it is just adds 1 or 2 strains.

                    I feel that a strong and viable colonization of mycorrhizae will greatly aid establishment, fight diseases, almost entirely wipe out nutrient deficiency, relieve stress in drought conditions and establish a more consistent ripening of the fruit

                    This link has more detail

                    http://mycorrhizae.com/faqs/

                    The Figster



                    looking for Col de Dame Blanc
                    Ian

                    Really happy with what I have.

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