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  • grasshopper
    commented on 's reply
    The concord grape bird repellent was first discovered in Cornell by accident. They noticed the birds pick all the grapes except the concord. And they were able to identify the chemical that cause short term irritation in birds and make it hold up longer in the sun. 

    https://bird-x.com/bird-products/gel...ids/bird-stop/

    You either have a flock of special birds or you have something else that eat the grapes. I used to make my own bird repeller by fermenting concord grape juice(aka wine ) I loaded it into water gun and shoot up to the birds that fly too close to the house. Not sure it worked because birds can fly faster than I can aim They generally don't like something shooting at them from below or a hollographic print balloon in their flight path. I have nettings for the berries. It was mostly unnecessary since I set a wide perimeter for the birds.

    I had Anne Gold before. They require very little sun and quite tasty.

  • jmrtsus
    commented on 's reply
    They have lots of food and figs are not common in this area. The LSU figs do deal with rust better than most, VDB and White Marseilles are not rust resistant in the least. As to the Concords once they turn purple without protection the birds wipe them out in days. Don't know what kind of birds are eating them as they are at the back of my property. But other than the fungus the birds leave the Green/Yellow fruits alone so my raspberries are 80% Fall Gold, I have weeded out almost all Red's due to birds.

  • grasshopper
    replied
    That is squirrels heaven There has to be a reason they don't go after the fruits much, either the fruits are foreign to the area and you pick them early enough or keep a clean yard or you plant them near the house or they have way more food to care

    You don't have coyote or any predator in the area?

    LSU figs are supposed to be wet proof? Oh well, my LSU purple had rust from the start. Drop all its leaves but bounced back after I put it in a high porosity soil.

    Concord grapes have a chemical that irritates birds so birds actually don't eat concord.

    Leave a comment:


  • jmrtsus
    replied
    I have both Oak and Hickory trees that feed the Squirrels and Chipmunks. They also feast on the bird food sunflower seeds and cat food before I lost the old cat. I have found for me and my location in a rural subdivision in E.TN (7a) with many, many Oak, Hickory and Pines to be a critter heaven. We have "gentrified" Possums,Rabbits and Raccoons that know the location of every dog and cat food bowl in the area. I have found that all are territorial and protect their food sources from interlopers pretty well. I have yet to have any creatures eating my figs so far. I do not think they even know what they are. I have shared a fig with a grateful turtle and had a Chipmunk that ate some cherries. I have to weed all the baby Oaks and Hickory trees from my potted figs every spring because the Squirrels lose track of them when I move the pots for the Winter. I keep water out for all the critters here and am sure they use many pets water containers for water. The nearest natural water is probably 3/4 miles away. I also plant sacrificial crops for critters. My Blueberries are after 3 years getting tall enough the Rabbits will no longer be able to pull the branches down to eat. The biggest "critter" problems are microscopic here, literally! I battle fungus more than any mammal with my Grapes and Figs (Rust). The Rust I will follow LSU's advise......ignore it but weed out some types. My Niagara's were wiped out but the Concord's next to them was fungus free. So as much as I like the Green (bird resistant) grapes for eating I am not sure I need additional chores like spraying......better to dump them. Same with some Fig types that are showing zero resistance to rust and completely defoliate every year, giveaways!

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  • grasshopper
    replied
    It depends on how much rain you have during the harvest season. Bloodmeal would work for 2-3 days of rain but not in heavy pour because everything will be washed away. This Plantskydd stuff is basically cattle or pigs blood, the same effective ingredient as blood meal but at 3-5 times the price. My guess is they make the granules slow to dissolve. I would try it if I can find it cheap. I wouldn't buy the powder form or the diluted spray form though because it is essentially overpaying for bloodmeal.

    I would tie a pouch of blood meal near the tree with a little foil to stop the rain pouring on it as a last defense.

    However, the important thing is to start making the perimeter early in the season so the animals are used to not coming near your garden, fruit or not. Many of their feedings are habitual. I did that with ultrasound. Commercial growers can't install that many ultrasound devices so I doubt it does have a ear piercing sound that will bother your neighbors and their dogs if you point at them.

    If you don't like the idea of marking your trees with blood, try to mark it with yogurt. It doesn't smell as badly, compare to eggs(which also works).

    Leave a comment:


  • YATAMA
    replied
    Having an asian persimmon tree plagued by squirrels pulling off then not eating many green fruit.I asked local AG extension people what to do.suggestion is product made of blood calledPLANTSKYDD comes in granules for establishing ground perimeter(maybe ok for rabbits, not aerial assault by sqs!)but theres also spray in bottles or concentrate.I plan to place small organza fig bags containing the granules tied to tree branches near the trunk and a few out on branches as a test.Regular cheap blood meal didn't work but
    a few days as rain ruined it but this stuff is said to last 3 weeks in all weather.its not cheap but asian persimmons sell in my grocery for a buck seventy five each and my one tree wants to crop 400 pounds each autumn if left alone.Amazon has PLANTSKYDD but local Southern States farm supply store has one form cheaper and says can order the other forms.20 bucks one quart spray bottle on amazon 3 pounds granules(I'm trying) about 30 bucks.Farm store guy says local wholesale nursery plant grower uses it for deer with solid results.only trial will tell! one neighbor claims putting dog poop in the organza bags might work but my wife refuses to eat any fruit if that's used!

    Leave a comment:


  • grasshopper
    replied
    I used an ultrasound device (you can get at Home Depot) and it worked on mice/chippies/squirrels.(It is designed for deer but pretty useless against deer) I used that because it has a good 30/40 ft range so they won't even come close to explore. I sprayed the area with yogurt water weekly and bloodmeal in case it rains(bloodmeal will be activated by rain as yogurt water is weakened by it). Bloodmeal is also an organic fertilizer. I use BirdX (tacky like Tangleroot) as a last defense. Actually, they would also have to break the organza bag and I will add chili powder to the bag as soon as they try.

    I also cleaned up all the acorns near my garden & my neighbors to reduce their temptation and dump them back to their trees. I also sprinkled catnip to get the neighborhood cats to come around sunbathing. They did not bother my garden or my immediate neighbors for years I lived there.

    To recap: Clean up their natural food, set up sound, scent, touch deterrents and attract their natural predators. All done without harming them or affecting their habitat/life.

    Leave a comment:


  • m5allen
    replied
    They seem to have a strong preference for any fig that I have a strong preference for and am anxiously awaiting to ripen.

    Leave a comment:


  • Anniebee
    replied
    I've never seen a squirrel at my house. Ever. I'm not sure why, but maybe they are afraid of ALL THE CHIPMUNKS! There are a lot of chipmunks, and they do like any and all figs. They didn't take much of the fruit this year, though. A few half-eaten here and there. They might have been too busy at my neighbor's bird feeder gathering sunflower and safflower seeds to plant in every single one of my pots.
    The time I saw a chipmunk on the garage roof my first thought was: "Chipmunks can fly!" No, they can't, but they sure can climb.

    Has anyone used Tanglefoot as a deterrent?

    Leave a comment:


  • DBJohnson
    replied
    Polyculture to the rescue! From what I’ve read, squirrels don’t like daffodils or garlic. Guess what is going to be planted around all of my trees?

    Granted, I don’t have a squirrel problem here. I’ve only seen two or three since moving in three and a half years ago despite the woods being full of oaks and hickory trees.

    Leave a comment:


  • grasshopper
    commented on 's reply
    Hopefully, that is not your cat. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWFXttBlSJI

  • mountainfigs
    commented on 's reply
    Maybe further deterrents will be necessary, but it's a fruitful area just naturally in the wild, and squirrel population hasn't seemed to change in a half dozen years of fig growing. If anything it seems to have decreased. Local cat population or activity seems to have increased a bit.

  • grasshopper
    commented on 's reply
    Just sprinkle some chili powder on top of the pots. They learn quickly not to dig again. But I usually don't let them come that close.

    I had a talk with my neighbor about how the stuff he used may bring him/his family cancer down the road and the alternatives such as vinegar spray and ground cover. I brought my own bottle and showed him how easy to kill the weeds naturally. I am glad he changed his mind.

  • grasshopper
    commented on 's reply
    Not now. But the mama squirrels will teach the baby squirrels where the food is. The family will grow bigger next year and the year after. They breed pretty quickly. It is 1% of your crop now but it won't be in couple seasons.

    I lived side by side with squirrels, flocks of birds and a herd of deer. I don't disturb their habitat and they don't come to mine.
    I don't feed them whether intentional or not. I don't go out of my way to hunt them either. Nature will be the population control if you don't let them eat your food. I always remind myself they are not my pets. They are wild and need to live on their own.

    Cats are not always the best guard for the garden depending on their age and breed. Certain dog breeds are better.

    Setting a boundary to your place is basic so they don't come to your garden look for food or shelter. There are many non-lethal way to deter them. Teach them early will save you a lot of frustration down the road. For squirrels, I used an ultrasound device because there was no one in the back wood. The range is good enough to set them far away from the garden but won't affect their nests.

  • mountainfigs
    commented on 's reply
    Lack of water here limits fruit ripening in fall. When it rains, the figs ripen. Why not put out water if it keeps critters away from your figs? 3 foot diameter toddler wading pool sunk into the ground year round here, and all love it - cats, birds, insects, garter snakes, transient frogs, box turtles, people, maybe squirrels though haven't seen them around it. Probably shouldn't feed the squirrels, but maybe a few peanuts would keep them from your pots? Maybe not. Better, a garden patch away from your garden patch? I don't care if the squirrels take a few figs from the bushes near the woods. In fact, I like it. And they take all crab apples too which keeps them from littering the ground. I'm sure they prefer the crab apples as those can be stored for the winter, unlike figs I assume. Mono cultures and scarcity typically create problems, of course. And maybe lack of deterrents like cats. Our cats don't seem to do much other than act as automated scarecrows. Seems to be enough.

  • figgrower
    replied
    I find that they prefer any of my ripe figs. Unfortunately, my neighbor feeds them, so the population keeps growing!

    Leave a comment:


  • Garlic_Mike
    replied
    My biggest problem with squirrels is the stupid juveniles digging in almost every pot looking for acorns that are not there.

    This time of year there is not much fruit around and the lack of water drives them to your figs.

    I noticed I can come inches away with a stone and they won't move. Switching to a co2 pistol has gotten their "attention" to where no ammo and the noise make them scatter. Some jump when they see me now, little @@@@@@@s!

    Vegan or not they would/will die. You don't have to eat them! Cripes, if my neighbor kills my tomatoes again spraying weeds I'll shoot him too! He's even a good guy!

    After my garden losses this season, my back yard will be a kill zone.

    Leave a comment:


  • TorontoJoe
    replied
    Around here they like the Etna's

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  • mountainfigs
    commented on 's reply
    I don't have a squirrel problem. Hell, I like having them around. I have cats too, so the squirrels don't dare get too bold. I'm vegetarian so wouldn't go after them. There are other ways to deter. I continue to study them. They seem to eat a partial fig, a third or maybe half, then come back the next day and finish it. So far they affect less then 1 percent of the crop. I suspect the two cats have a lot to do with it.

  • grasshopper
    replied
    Have you set traps for them like tube traps? How about ultrasound? Or bloodmeal spray?

    Leave a comment:


  • mountainfigs
    started a topic squirrel preferences in figs

    squirrel preferences in figs

    Has anyone noted any squirrel or chipmunk preferences in fig varieties? The preference here seems to be LSU Purple over Mt Etna, for late season in ground ripening bushes. LSU Purple is ripening sweeter now than Etna, so that may account for the apparent preference. The Etnas are ripening more numerously, and more flavorfully, but less sweet than LSU Purple in the late season.

    LSU Purple on in ground bushes seems to have a lighter and somehow sweet-centric flavor compared to the more musky maple sugar flavor of potted LSU Purple trees here.

    Amazing to me that figs are easier to grow in central Appalachia than, say, apples and most any other tree fruit ... at least on young trees and bushes.
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