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  • Fig tree I came across the other day

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    I was driving along the east side of Lake Apopka just west of Orlando, when this tree behind someone's house caught my eye. Its really rewarding when you start getting into a certain kind of plant, then you start noticing more of them. Even better if you can talk to the owner and get some history. Luckily the gentleman was out mowing his yard, so I turned around, introduced myself, and asked about his fig tree. He told me it was a Brown Turkey, planted in 1991, and I was welcome to some fruit at the end of July.... The guy was 90 years old, and still mowing his yard. I can only hope! All of my trees have varying levels of rust right now, but this tree showed no signs, plus he says he doesn't do anything to the tree, except keep the base mulched. This is the largest tree I have came across, now that I am looking. Just wanted to share, plus I read on some other member's posts that this variety makes a good rootstock. Any thoughts about this one for rootstock here in Florida, and is it common for this cultivar to not experience rust?
    Andre
    Western Orange County, FL

  • #2
    I can imagine how many figs that tree puts out every year! Great story.
    Frank ~ zone 7a VA

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    • #3
      Andre,
      Thanks for sharing this story.

      A possible reason why there is minimal signs of Rust is that the gentleman keeps a "Clean" yard and removes the possible sources of inoculation, infected dead leaves.
      Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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      • #4
        Pete, your right he definitely keeps the inoculents out of the yard. But so do I... I also learned in my Plant Pathology class that your yard can be "clean," but someone down the road can have spores, and through vectors, you will too.
        Andre
        Western Orange County, FL

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        • AscPete
          AscPete commented
          Editing a comment
          I would be curious about his mulch, it may be have some anti-fungal properties, but it may simply be an advantageous prevailing wind

        • Fruitaddict
          Fruitaddict commented
          Editing a comment
          There is probably something to his local winds, Pete. He is less than a quarter mile from the lake, and the West side of the lake has the highest peninsular elevation for Florida at 300 feet . Most people from mountainous areas, laugh when I say that... 300 feet.

        • Fruitaddict
          Fruitaddict commented
          Editing a comment
          Eucalyptus... is what he told me today, when I asked if I could get cuttings this winter. Never thought of anti-fungal properties of the mulch to break the rust life cycle, but makes perfect sense. Pete, thanks for the tip.

      • #5
        I have two BT's planted side by side and they both came from the same mother tree.
        One sometimes gets rust, while the other one never does. Go figure.
        Ray in Columbia, SC Zone 8

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        • #6
          Great story Andre. Thanks for sharing. Maybe the secret of the 90 year old dude cutting his own lawn is the figs! Eating all those babies(figs) keep him young and vibrant. In that case there sure is hope for all!

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          • Fruitaddict
            Fruitaddict commented
            Editing a comment
            Chris, he was out there fertilizing his yard with a walk behind rig, and it was 90 degrees out when I drove by yesterday. Just gotta stay active and eat your figs!

        • #7
          I am surprised that you even saw a fig tree here in Florida. In the Tampa Brandon area I have yet to see the first one in a yard. Joyce

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          • #8
            I wasn't that into figs but I remember seeing a fig tree growing in Florida when I was at my nephews graduation Daytona beach area. It was very large and healthy. I'll have to see if I can find the name of restaurant we were at since it was right beside it.
            NC Zone 7a-b

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            • #9
              I have one dwarf brown Turkey my son has one also we are 10 miles apart in zone 6a They were 1 YO last year. Hs got a bad dose of rust and lost all leaves. This winter it did not survive in his garage. Mine is thriving. Just don't know...we are keeping all of his new figs at my home until he moves.
              Chauqg Zone 6b North of Pittsburgh

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              • #10
                You asked if this is a good tree for rootstock here in Florida. I believe this to be the hardiest tree for the Florida area. BT is arguably the best adapted and dependable fig for Florida. It's so common I would hate to add it to my collection because everyone seems to have one. My grandparents BT has never failed a season.
                Randall - Gulf Breeze, FL. zone 8b. Wish list: Anything that "newnandawg" - Mike, ranks as an 8 out 10 or higher.

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