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  • How you do deal with curl grubs?

    I'm having an issue with curl grubs. Ick! I'd noticed a couple of trees that I rooted last year had stalled, even though they were being fertilized regularly and were being watered sufficiently. They simply stopped putting on growth. I pulled 2 trees out of their pots to check for dry spots and freshen their mix - and one of the trees had about 7 curl grubs nestled in at the base of the root ball. The other only had maybe 2 or 3 curl grubs. After cleaning out the grubs from the root balls, doing a light root prune, and repotting with some fresh mix - I put the pots into a more shaded area for some recovery.

    The tree with only a couple of grubs is bouncing back, and putting out new top growth and some suckers. The other tree which had the bad infestation in the pot isn't bouncing back and is slowly losing leaves.

    I did try sitting the pots in water to the soil line - but it didn't seem to work. Maybe I didn't leave the pots in the water long enough. I'm wondering if some of you have some suggestions on encouraging the curl grubs to vacate the pots - or is manually removing them during repotting the only option?
    Kate - on acreage in a subtropical/warm temperate growing region
    My grow list:- https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...it?usp=sharing

  • #2
    Kate... I looked up curl grubs on google as I wasn't too sure what they were and the pics look to me to be similar to or the same as Japanese beetle grubs... I don't usually have issues with these in my potted plants although i have seen them in the pots from time to time. There is an insecticide that I use for my lawn called "grubex" which appears to work however I don't know about the safety of using them on fruiting plants. Personally, I would opt for manual removal or a bacterial vector that I have seen mentioned on some sites that can be bought in dust form and applied as I imagine that would be the safest path...
    Tony - Zone 6A
    WL- Popone, Craven's Craving

    Comment


    • NangkitaKate
      NangkitaKate commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks heaps Tony! Yes - they're the Japanese beetle grub and related beetles. The kookaburras keep them down in our gardens, but they can't dig them out of the pots.

      There are poisons for use on lawns, but they probably aren't safe for fruit trees. I may just need to resign myself to manually removing them. They are so big are disgusting

  • #3

    Kate, I use Riptide for pest ( including beetle ) control. It is approved for use on fruiting plants and trees, and is simply added into your irrigation water.

    http://www.epestsupply.com/cgi-bin/s...E#.WoL-uOjwa70
    In our orchard it is healthy robust trees, or nothing. The sickly and stunted need not apply...

    Comment


    • NangkitaKate
      NangkitaKate commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks so much Blue - I'll check this out and see if I can find an Australian distributor.

  • #4
    Just curious, Kate. Did you have a lot of Japanese beetles last year?
    Cheryl (f/k/a VeryNew2Figs) Zone 5a/6a
    What I'm growing: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...it?usp=sharing

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    • NangkitaKate
      NangkitaKate commented
      Editing a comment
      No - I don't recall a grub problem from the beetles last year, and didn't find any in the one fig that I needed to repot a year ago. I think it may just be a bad year for the grubs, which happens occasionally.

  • #5
    As Tony notes, there is a bacterial product that you can use to fight Japanese beetles, called Milky Spore (which is the name of the disease it causes). Supposedly it stays active in soil for up to 10 years.
    Joe, Z6B, RI

    Wish List: 140 days >70 F

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    • NangkitaKate
      NangkitaKate commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks Joe - I'll research this product too.

  • #6
    look up “milky spore”. It is from japan and why they don’t have a problem.
    figs, peaches, apples, nectarines, pomegranates, cherry, pistachio, and pear tree grower 😄

    Comment


    • NangkitaKate
      NangkitaKate commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks - I'll check it out

  • #7
    Hb nematodes are supposed to be effective against grubs and could be a long term solution.
    Don.
    Grapevines by day, figs by night/weekends.

    Comment


    • NangkitaKate
      NangkitaKate commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks Don - I googled hb nematodes, and found an Australian range of nematode products that look good. I may have to delay trying them until the weather cools off.

    • Laeotis
      Laeotis commented
      Editing a comment
      I ordered three different boxes of beneficial nematodes and they killed maybe three, if any, problem is I have two different kinds of grubs, the bigger fatter grubs aren't effected by the BN I'm going to try the milky spore this year.

    • NangkitaKate
      NangkitaKate commented
      Editing a comment
      Laeotis - thanks for that info. I may just skip the BN then and stick to de-potting to remove the curl grubs. The bigger fatter ones sound like the ones I've fished out of the pot. Hopefully I'll get most of my potted figs planted out this coming winter, and then the kookaburras will take care of them.

  • #8
    Hey NangkitaKate, are you trees still curling or is fine now.

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    • #9
      codywinsett - thanks for asking My tree was still showing signs of distress and deteriorating, so I pruned its branches back and pulled the tree out of the pot a couple of days ago. I found another 5 curl grubs situated around the root ball and chewing it back, and they must have been further in amongst the roots when I repotted and root pruned it the other week.

      This time I cleaned all of the dirt out of the root ball, and root pruned severely as there were a lot of damaged roots. There were still some good strong roots and a bit of new root growth, so I am hopeful. I down-potted what was left of the tree and root ball to a 175mm diameter pot, and I'll basically treat it like a cutting until I see it budding out or it dies.

      I've potted up the 4 small branches (more like twigs) that I pruned off the tree, and I may get one of two to root. My kill rate with summer rooting is fairly high compared to my winter rooting success rates

      Fortunately I've got a couple of this variety in pots if it doesn't survive.
      Kate - on acreage in a subtropical/warm temperate growing region
      My grow list:- https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...it?usp=sharing

      Comment


      • #10
        Sooo ... LonKemp - are you being paid by the post or by the business you generate for these pest controllers? Just asking - because I'm in Australia, and pimping pest controllers to me is sort of a wasted effort
        Kate - on acreage in a subtropical/warm temperate growing region
        My grow list:- https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...it?usp=sharing

        Comment


        • #11
          I would try Milky Spores as it seems to stay longer in warm condition. I had tried BN before and it worked for couple seasons but it needs moist, cool environment to keep the population up.

          Comment


          • #12
            Nice suggestion grasshopper - thank you I'm currently in the process of digging planting spots out in the orchard for some of my figs, and I'm finding big grubs and baby grubs. I'll definitely be treating the holes with something prior to planting out my trees, to get rid of the ones I've missed.
            Kate - on acreage in a subtropical/warm temperate growing region
            My grow list:- https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...it?usp=sharing

            Comment

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