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  • Prusch Park

    For the first time, I finally got around to visiting the Prusch Farm Park in San Jose yesterday afternoon. I'd first heard about it from Gary as a local fig attraction, then from other friends who liked it for the farm/petting zoo/garden/picnicking opportunities. My partner and I stopped by there an hour before they closed to check it out before getting dinner in San Jose's Japantown. We only live about half an hour away, and it's worth the trip!

    They have a good collection of trees in their fig orchard. The larger trees weren't labeled, but there were a few smaller ones that still had metal or plastic tags, which probably included the ones donated by Harvey. There was an Aubique Petite, Italian 358, two unlabeled but huge Panache trees, and many others. Some of them weren't in great shape, but others were large and covered with many figs. The fauna must be enjoying the park come harvest time!

    It'd be a great place for a family to bring a picnic and enjoy the farm and gardens. In addition to the figs, they had a sizable apple and pear orchard, vegetable garden, greenhouses, picnic areas, and a farm with chicken coop, rabbits, goats you can feed and pet, turkeys, pigs, cows, and more. There were a great many duck, geese, chickens, and other fowl roaming wild which one of the volunteers said weren't officially part of the park, but were adopted from people dropping off pets illegally. They just roam the grounds at will, eating their share of the produce.

    Already planning to return later in the year when the figs are ripe, in case the squirrels spare a few. Those Panaches in particular looked beautiful, completely covered in striped figs. They also had large swathes that had reverted to their non-chimeric form, would be fun to compare the two.
    You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 7 photos.
    Sarah
    Bay Area, CA (zone: 9B)

  • #2
    Have heard a lot of nice things about the park, have a few figs from there as well thanks to Posturedoc.
    Cutting sales have ended for the season. Plant sales will start March 1 at 8 eastern time. If it is still too cold in your area I can hold your plants till a date of your choosing.

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    • #3
      Thanks for sharing.
      Calvin, Wish list is to finish working on the new house, someday.
      Bored? Grab a rake, paint roller, or a cordless drill and come over!

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      • #4
        Thanks for sharing the photos and info.
        I read about the park a few times on the fig forums, but thought that it was a small plot with a few fig trees.
        Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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        • #5
          The park is a large plot with many sections. The fig orchard is just one of several orchards, and there seems to be a larger focus on the vegetable garden and farm. I didn't count the fig trees, but I'd estimate maybe 30 trees or so, of varying sizes. It's a shame that more of them aren't labeled, but likely it helps prevent pruning disease...
          Sarah
          Bay Area, CA (zone: 9B)

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          • HarveyC
            HarveyC commented
            Editing a comment
            Yes, the CRFG chapter maintains the map and the trees get labeled temporarily just before cuttings are pruned for scion exchanges. Then the labels are removed. Same for the stone fruit trees. Even with the map it's pretty hard for me to figure out the rows.

        • #6
          Yes, thanks for providing the photos - now I have a better understanding of what people are talking about when they mention this orchard. I believe I have at least one fig from there as well: Col de Dame Noir.
          Steve
          D-i-c-k-e-r-s-o-n, MD; zone 7a
          WL: Verdolino, Figue Jaune, Nantes Maroc, Lussheim

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          • Sarahkt
            Sarahkt commented
            Editing a comment
            Steve, do you know if that tree was labeled, or just recognized due to leaf/fig morphology? My cuttings of that one just gave up. I'm considering joining the local CRFG chapter, and it seems they know what each tree is.

          • Rewton
            Rewton commented
            Editing a comment
            Sarah, my tree came from Gene H. Long story short, it sounds like it came from Leon in NM who said it originated from cuttings taken from a tree in Prusch Park. I would think the tree was labeled as leaf morphology would not really be enough information to be confident. I need to confirm this with Leon. Good idea about joining CRFG, if I lived where you do I would definitely be a member.

        • #7
          I may be down that way next week...might just have to take a peek

          Thanks Sarah
          Ross B. Santa Rosa Calif zone 9b, wish list: CdD Blanc, Igo, Palmata, Sucrette, Morroco, Galicia Negra

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          • Sarahkt
            Sarahkt commented
            Editing a comment
            You should! Though now is not an ideal time for either plucking ripe figs or taking dormant cuttings (which I guess is technically for the CRFG to do). At the very least, you'll enjoy the sights and be able to feed some goats. The animals at the farm made almost as big impression on me as the fig orchard, ha.

          • rusty hooks
            rusty hooks commented
            Editing a comment
            not much choice on timing....it may happen that it will be this next week or a slight delay to the following week...business. I was going to take inventory and ask questions...as far as goats go....I've had a lifetime fill of goats. I had a very small primeval goat dairy in the early 70's while in school at Humboldt.....milked 15 head before and after school each day.....too much goat time

        • #8
          Nice report, Sarah. I've tried to get there twice, but haven't made it yet. Next month I'll try again.
          Gary USDA 9A
          Sebastopol, CA

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          • #9
            Hey Gary! You should definitely check it out if you get a chance, as you were the one who first told me about it. It might be worth waiting until the figs are ripe. Or when the trees are dormant...
            Sarah
            Bay Area, CA (zone: 9B)

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            • #10
              There's a map showing which trees are which, although a few are in doubt.
              Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

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              • Sarahkt
                Sarahkt commented
                Editing a comment
                Interesting, thanks for sharing, Bob. Is the map posted at the site? Do you know which ones are questionable?

              • HarveyC
                HarveyC commented
                Editing a comment
                I only know of one in doubt - a tree marked as Black Ischia on the map appears to be VdB. I prevented it from being distributed as such in January 2014. I have a copy of the map but am not permitted to share it.

                Joining CRFG is a good thing, IMO. I belong to the parent organization and 4 chapters.

                Oddly, they don't have Italian 258 there but I will get that remedied eventually.

              • Sarahkt
                Sarahkt commented
                Editing a comment
                Thanks, Harvey. I went and finally joined the state org and the local Santa Clara chapter a few days ago. So far seems like it will be fun, but I haven't really checked out the yahoo groups and activities yet. I saw that there are some regular meetings and "work dates" -- do you go to any of those?

            • #11
              Map....did someone say "MAP"
              Ross B. Santa Rosa Calif zone 9b, wish list: CdD Blanc, Igo, Palmata, Sucrette, Morroco, Galicia Negra

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