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  • When is too late to start cuttings?

    Through the generosity of members of this board (you know who you are and many thanks again) I have a plethora of cuttings...some beginning to bud. Is it too late to start some of these? ....or should I wrap them and keep in the fridge until winter?
    Bryant...Franklin County, VA...Zone 7a. Wish List: a 32 hour day....more sleep

  • #2
    Though my experience with cuttings is minimal, any that are not showing any signs of breaking dormancy I might put in the fridge until next spring. Any that are growing or trying to grow I would start with the mind set that they me be house plants for awhile. At least until they are large enough and strong enough to put to sleep.
    Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

    “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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    • #3
      i still have cuttings that I received in March that are rooting. If the buds are starting to swell you might want to root them in your favorite method (direct, sphagnum moss, coconut coir). I've done all of these methods and have the least issues with coir with which I've had no issues with mold or rot.

      I've heard that cuttings can last in a fridge for a year but I've never done it.

      Good Luck
      Kevin (Eastern MA - Zone 5b/6a)

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      • #4
        Its never too late to start cuttings...
        I've just started some cuttings in the past few weeks and will be starting the last batch this week.
        They are started indoors (in the dark) and placed in front of a window before being moved outdoors. I no longer root cuttings in late winter or early spring because of the need for additional ambient warmth (added heat), and rooting them in late spring or summer gives them a head start for next season.

        Photo of cuttings ready to be up potted to 1 gallon containers and moved outside into a shaded location.
        Click image for larger version

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        Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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        • #5
          I agree with Pete i.e. it is much easier to root them in the warmer months. The only problem is that you need a way to overwinter the young plants. If they are really young I have kept them going in front of a south window as a house plant. But that is a lot of work and last year I had to deal with scales on a fig rooted in September.
          Steve
          D-i-c-k-e-r-s-o-n, MD; zone 7a
          WL: Nantes Maroc

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          • AscPete
            AscPete commented
            Editing a comment
            I train them as single stem and usually let them go dormant for the winter, in spring I either prune off the top (to promote branching) or let the growth continue as single stem.

        • #6
          Thanks! Looks like I'll be getting some cuttings going in the next few days.
          Bryant...Franklin County, VA...Zone 7a. Wish List: a 32 hour day....more sleep

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          • #7
            What Pete says.

            Here is a large batch stuck 6/18/2015 and a small batch stuck 7/9/2014. The good cuttings seem to jump to a fast start with the warm days and nights.
            You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 2 photos.
            Jerry, Canyon Lake TX 8b

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            • #8
              Well, I went through all the cuttings that I had and put all that showed buds or initials into a sealed plastic box wrapped in moistened spagnham moss on Monday, June 13. Have checked moisture levels and let fresh air in daily. Carefully checked a few of the cuttings today and found several with roots started.

              At what point should I pot in the clear plastic cups?
              Bryant...Franklin County, VA...Zone 7a. Wish List: a 32 hour day....more sleep

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              • #9
                Most people do it as soon the roots have formed.
                Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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                • #10
                  Thanks! Looks like I'll be putting some in dirt this evening.
                  Bryant...Franklin County, VA...Zone 7a. Wish List: a 32 hour day....more sleep

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                  • COGardener
                    COGardener commented
                    Editing a comment
                    You can also cheat!!! Buy a couple raffle squares and you could win a couple small trees.... Never know!!

                • #11
                  Be gentle. Congrats on getting roots.
                  Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                  “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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                  • #12
                    Congratulations on the roots. You don't want the roots to get too long as you may damage them when you pot them up.

                    And remember that some cuttings will just sit there for weeks while they acclimate to their new home. If they start pushing leaves then put them in a place where they get partial sun (but not too hot) or under lights.

                    Good Luck, welcome to the cult. Resistance is futile
                    Kevin (Eastern MA - Zone 5b/6a)

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                    • #13
                      I lost all of my indoor growing trees to scales and mites two years ago. Seem like they came from nowhere as soon as I brought them inside. They kept coming back when I used neem oil. I'm afraid to try again.
                      Proudly Serving in the United States Armed Forces, 2009-2017
                      Everyone should have a green thumb

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                      • fitzski
                        fitzski commented
                        Editing a comment
                        sorry to hear that, i had a spider mite infestation that took out my citrus last winter. I sprayed and sprayed but they kept coming back. I finally gave up and tossed them all. Maybe I'll try again when I have more time to baby them.

                    • #14
                      Sorry to hear that, how many did you loose? I kept 3 trees going and growing in my makeshift garage greenhouse for the whole winter. I have two TC figs that I just got and they are seedling tiny so they will be getting the same treatment this winter.
                      Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                      “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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                      • fitzski
                        fitzski commented
                        Editing a comment
                        i have 3 TC trees from WellSpring that I'll probably keep growing all winter. When I got them I laughed, they were tiny. Healthy but tiny I'm trying to keep them isolated from my other cuttings/trees until they are larger.
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