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  • A Light Mt Etna Cultivar?

    It's just a theory at the moment, but given its leaf shape and so on, I wonder if Bianchetta might be the light (yellow) "twin" of the dark Mt Etna cultivar (Hardy Chicago, Marseilles Black, etc).

    With much less to go on, I wonder further if Verdetta is the green twin of Bianchetta and/or of dark Mt Etna. Verdetta may not have made it to the US yet, or even to North America, unfortunately. Adriano's in Canada lists Bianchetta but not Verdetta.

    Bianchetta and Verdetta may be (or be thought to be) the light "twins" of Negretta; however, photos of Bianchetta show leaf shapes that look much more like a Mt Etna leaf shape, than like the more Late Bordeaux type leaf shape of Negretta.

    In photos, leaves of Bianchetta look nearly identical to dark Mt Etna leaves. Also, as with dark Mt Etna, Bianchetta's fruit is small (though yellow of course). Bianchetta is said to be hardy and to grow wild, not cultivated, on the "southern rim of the Alps." I wonder if Bianchetta and/or Verdetta might be growing also on Mt Etna.

    On the other hand, if Bianchetta is not growing on Mt Etna, and if Bianchetta actually turns out to be a light twin of dark Mt Etna, then the question becomes, did the dark "Mt Etna" figs originate near the Alps rather than on Mt Etna...? Alps figs? Or did Bianchetta "migrate" from Mt Etna to the Alps?

    Anyway, these speculations are based on my recent stumbling over two separate discussions with accompanying photos that took place four years apart at two fig forums:
    http://tinyurl.com/ozotapv and http://tinyurl.com/oq74ept

    The first photo of Bianchetta included here, below, belongs to nelson20vt, and the second Bianchetta photo belongs to rafed (both photos along with others may be found in the second link above). These photos show what look like Mt Etna type leaves to me, though of course they may or may not be. Compare to the photos on the Ourfigs Mt Etna Leaf thread:
    http://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-ho...af-comparisons

    Recently at an Ourfigs Hardy Chicago thread I noted that "Especially when IDing via leaf shape, I sometimes think of the Mt Etna type as the Sword fig. I don't recall any other type that can consistently develop or extend that central lobe so far in comparison to the other lobes, which can grow jammed back at the base of the jagged sword blade, like an ornate hand guard." Some of the photos show Bianchetta to have that distinct sword leaf shape common to Mt Etna, along with that other distinct stubbier leaf shape also common to Mt Etna.



    You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 2 photos.
    Tony WV 6b
    https://mountainfigs.net/
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