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  • OT: Goji berries

    What are some good varieties and where to get them?
    Jerry, Canyon Lake TX 8b

  • #2
    I have no idea what cultivar I have Jerry, but to me they taste like a mix of strawberry and cranberry. ... maybe some other stuff in there to. ..lol.

    At any rate, I have numerous suckers, most are spoken for locally, how every I'm happy to ship you some.

    PM me your address if you want some and give me a week or two.
    Last edited by COGardener; 08-03-2015, 12:27 PM.
    Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

    “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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    • #3
      Phoenix Tears carried by Raintree is very productive and grows well, at least here it is.
      Calvin, Wish list is to finish working on the new house, someday.
      Bored? Grab a rake, paint roller, or a cordless drill and come over!

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      • #4
        Local Nurseries and Lowes sells 1 gallon plants in the NYC area, look for Lycium barbarum cultivars. They can also be purchased on the web. Got mine in trade @ a local nursery as a 1 gallon plant late spring and its already producing lots of flowers, with 6' long vines. Good Luck.

        BTW the leaves are edible and are sold commercially in Asia, tried a few raw and they taste like spinach.
        You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 1 photos.
        Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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        • #5
          Got a Goji from Burnt Ridge about 8 or 9 years ago. The plant grows like a weed in 8+hrs of sun but has never fruited. I tried a plant that I started at a friends zone 7 location a few years ago thinking the problem might be my location but the same result, no fruit.
          I found this video on youtube that might explain what was occurring.
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=69rlc7Wwl8A
          My recommendation is go with a proven cultivar. If you order from a nursery check that they are not shipping seedlings.
          John Z5 Wish list:

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          • #6
            If I were you, I would get rid of that. It should have fruited in a couple years. They are easy to reproduce from cuttings or seeds. We have two goji plants that taste slightly different. They are hard to describe as they are unique. They taste sweet kind of like a persimmons. You want to start pinching at about 12 inches to encourage it to bush, otherwise you get a long branch that grows to your roof tops.

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            • #7
              I had a pair of Proven Winner gojis that didn't make it through last winter outdoor in pots- I should have put them in ground, but acquired them late in the season....anyone got suckers or layers from proven fruiting plants to trade?
              Jesse in western Maine, zone 4/5
              Wishlist- earliest maincrop varieties

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              • #8
                Edible Landscaping also sells the Phoenix Tears Cultivar, http://ediblelandscaping.com/product...s/GojiBerries/

                Calvin, cis4elk posted pictures of his "pruned" tree form Phoenix Tears Goji plant @ F4F last year, http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox....ght=goji+berry
                Click image for larger version

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                Its growing (pruned) as the typical commercial Umbrella or cylinder Tree form. In my very limited time growing Goji it seems that the cascading branches are a key to producing more berries (causes branching due to loss of apical dominance), http://paulowniatrees.eu/products/go...of-goji-berry/ . Similar to fig tree pruning, establishing the main and scaffold branches and pruning back the Goji fruiting branches yearly increases fruit production, http://paulowniatrees.eu/eng/wp-cont...ng_Goji-EN.pdf . Its interesting to note that foliage or leaf production was the main commercial use of the plant.
                Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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              • #9
                I do nothing with mine and they are covered in blossoms and fruit.
                Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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                • #10
                  Scott, does your Goji get any sort of fungus? Last year mine got something which resembles or could be black spot fungus, but the only thing affected is the Goji. The leaves get covered with little black powdery spots, which eventually result in total defoliation. The leaves grow back but it does disturb the 2nd crop, it doesn't grow on the berries just makes them not ripen proper without leaves.
                  I haven't tried spraying with anything, I was thinking about using a copper or neem spray but didn't get around to it and it's too late now for this year.
                  I was thinking about taking some cuttings this fall, hoping that a bleach water soak will kill off the fungus so I don't establish it(fungus) at our new house. The new house has Goji growing already but they aren't productive like mine is.
                  Calvin, Wish list is to finish working on the new house, someday.
                  Bored? Grab a rake, paint roller, or a cordless drill and come over!

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                  • COGardener
                    COGardener commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Calvin, not that I have noticed. .. however, I really don't pay much attention to them other than picking berries as I walk by and wanting to get mid-evil on hacking them back after there done fruiting. l'll take a look again.

                  • COGardener
                    COGardener commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I looked this morning, and there is no spots of any kind. With as wet as this year has been, and as full as the bushes are, I'm surprised.

                • #11
                  I checked out the EL link Pete post and noticed in the Goji description it is a vining shrub. I am thinking it can be grown and trained like black berries. To see what I mean Google "training blackberries" and click on Images.
                  Jerry, Canyon Lake TX 8b

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                • #12
                  Mine grow up and then weep down, the canes must be around 10 feet long. I do plan to implement a trellis system next year.
                  Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                  “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

                  Comment


                  • #13
                    I realize that it may be a bit premature, but the commercial training/pruning technique seems to be yielding good early results. I currently have at least a dozen formed green berries, with dozens of developing flowers, two at every leaf node of the "weeping branches" on my newly acquired plant (PW Big Lifeberry), hopefully some will ripen before fall. The weeping branches that are developing flowers start ~3 feet above soil line, the planned final height of top most scaffold arms is ~6 feet above soil line. The planned pruned shape is a dual (two) level Umbrella. Instead of pruning at the desired level to promote branching I've opted for simply allowing the main branches to droop, which produces the desired branching.

                    This 5 gal plant will be over wintered with the potted fig trees and planted in ground next spring. I've also ordered the Pheonix Tears cultivar for taste comparison.
                    You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 5 photos.
                    Last edited by AscPete; 08-09-2015, 12:55 PM.
                    Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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                    • #14
                      An Update on the 5 gallon potted PW Goji...
                      Lots of formed green berries and all the drooping branches are developing even more flower buds at at leaf nodes. A Raspberry trellis with wires at 3' and 6' (or higher) could definitely work to establish a row of Goji plants, with the drooping branches pruned back to the "wires" every spring.
                      You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 6 photos.
                      Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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                      • jmaler
                        jmaler commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Looking good. I use 30" and 60" trellis wires for blackberries. Itxs what I thought I'd do with the goji berries or maybe train them on cattle panels I use for growing tomatoes.

                    • #15
                      I've been harvesting individual ripe Goji berries for the past few weeks. They are now starting to ripen en masse. They are very sweet when left on the tree to swell and "ripen" for several days after they turn red. If picked as soon as they turn red they are almost bitter, and taste similar to dry, hard, green tomatoes with lots of seeds.
                      You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 3 photos.
                      Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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                      • jkuo
                        jkuo commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Interesting. Maybe I picked my gojis too early last year. They were sweet, but had a really distinct bitter taste around the skin. I'm not sure I could leave them on for several days though. They scream bird food at that red stage.

                      • AscPete
                        AscPete commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Johnny,
                        The first dozen or so sampled were picked early before they had time to 'Swell' and 'Ripen' they were definitely bitter tasting. I'm lucky enough to have several local 'birds of prey' so there's always minimal fruit damage and pilfering from birds.

                    • #16
                      Hmm, my firs year goji plant had one really tiny berry on it that is red. I mean really small....like 2-3 mm small but it is red. I was wondering if they just grew red the whole time. Anyone think it is ripe? lol Should I pick it and try it?
                      Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Zaffiro, Moro de Caneva, Nerucciolo d'Elba, Bordissot Blanca Negra, Rubado

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                      • #17
                        Excerpt from an auction on ebay: Note:Our wide leaf variety, "Botany Goji",is more vigorous and productive than the narrow leaf variety, but the narrow leaf makes a good pollinator. Goji plants have male and female parts on the small purple flowers of each plant,but they are self-sterile and will not pollinate themselves and need two genetically different plantsto produce fruit berries. Self-sterile example: An orchard of Hale Haven peaches will flower beautifully but will not produce peaches. If another variety is added the will then produce peaches. The fruit will be visually identical to the mother plants and the seedling peaches will have characteristics of both parents. Honey bees are the best pollinators.
                        http://www.ebay.com/itm/GOJI-Wolfber...3D321882495842

                        "two genetically different plantsto produce fruit berries" ok so what about this? Are you growers using two genetically different plants to pollinate?
                        Jerry, Canyon Lake TX 8b

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                        • AscPete
                          AscPete commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I have one plant and its producing hundreds of berries.
                          The seller is 'marketing' the purchase of multiple plants to unsuspecting buyers.

                          The Goji flower only needs pollinators (insects and bees) to move the pollen from the stamens to the pistil, each flower is self fertile.

                      • #18
                        I have two genetically identical plants and get tons of fruit!!!!

                        Additionally, to the best of my knowledge ALL peaches are self fruiting, adding pollinators only serves to increase yields.
                        Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                        “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

                        Comment


                        • AscPete
                          AscPete commented
                          Editing a comment
                          The J H Hale peach variety is one of the known 'self sterile' peach variety, its pollen is sterile so it needs pollen from another peach cultivar.

                      • #19
                        Good choice to add to their gimmick then.
                        Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                        “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

                        Comment


                        • AscPete
                          AscPete commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Actually its not
                          Hale Haven Peach trees are self fertile like most Peach cultivars, the JH Hale is the cultivar that's 'self sterile'.
                          Its possible that the Ad is referring to the 'Botany Goji' cultivar which is grown for leaves and not fruit... ???

                      • #20
                        I'm so excited. I just received in todays mail some goji shoots with roots. Plan to get them in ground this evening.

                        How far apart should they be planted in a row?
                        Jerry, Canyon Lake TX 8b

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                        • #21
                          Jerry, Unpruned they can get ten feet across. I hope they do well for you!
                          Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                          “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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                          • jmaler
                            jmaler commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Thank You Sir. I'll try the utmost to do right by them.

                        • #22
                          While in the pots recovering from being lifted, I was watering them daily. Keeping the soil rather wet while they were growing roots.

                          They are hardy but still sensitive and I'm sure shocked from being bare rooted and shipped.

                          With a little babying I'm sure they will be fine, if not hit me up next spring I will dig up some more. I would imagine that in your growing climate and extended season you should see fruit next year. Just a reminder for your planting site the more Sun you can give them the better. Mind that are growing slightly shaded seem to not fruit or barely fruit while the ones that get full Sun are covered in fruit every year. Also being from the Himalayas they're used to getting a lot more water than what we normally do here in the desert so I water them and water them and water them and water them and I've been greatly rewarded for my efforts.
                          Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                          “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

                          Comment


                          • #23
                            Jerry,
                            Congratulations and Good luck.

                            A commercial prescribed row spacing is documented here, http://paulowniatrees.eu/eng/wp-cont...ng_Goji-EN.pdf . For a small garden they recommend 3 feet between plants and 4-1/2 feet between rows. I plan on establishing a row of tree pruned plants next year with the 2 different cultivars, Big Lifeberry and Pheonix Tears. They are extremely easy to propagate by air layering and it only took 1 week to get roots on the outside of a small air layer container.

                            Scott's recommendation of water, water and water is good advise because they seem to use a lot of water and they also seem to need a lot of water to ripen the berries properly. Attached is a photo of a few Big Lifeberry berries after they were picked and just before they were eaten.
                            Click image for larger version

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                            Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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                            • jmaler
                              jmaler commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Pete, thanks for the link. It is most informative. Where mine are planted soil is sandy loam high PH. The soil grows beautiful cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli. I'll water the goji again tomorrow and then mulch well with wood chips. They should be fine.

                          • #24
                            Thanks guys. Two were planted in ground full sun about 10' apart. A third went into a gallon pot to winter indoors for a next spring planting.
                            Jerry, Canyon Lake TX 8b

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                            • #25
                              Very nice Jerry. Let me know how they do for you.
                              Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                              “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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