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  • Bellefleurs
    commented on 's reply
    Jamie, Thank you for the great thread on banana grafts. How can you tell when a tree is ready to be a host? I have a few in the ground that I’d like to try and a few are just starting to “wake up”.

  • Jamie0507
    commented on 's reply
    Go for it Steve!

  • Rewton
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks - this is exactly what I wanted to know! Now to wake up some rootstock without filling my house with fungus gnats. Hmmm....

  • Jamie0507
    commented on 's reply
    I decided to start a new thread for this pictorial, but I will tag you when its posted 😉 I figure its better that way so anyone not already following this post may have a better chance of seeing it 👍🏼

  • Figs4All
    replied
    That would be much appreciated.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jamie0507
    commented on 's reply
    Hi Figs4All Sure I can talk about it in more detail.. but perhaps its time for a new pictorial! I keep wanting to make a video of it, but I just haven’t had the chance. I’ll be doing more banana grafts on the cuttings either today or tomorrow so I will make a new pictorial to post here on this thread 👍🏼

  • Figs4All
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks Jamie0507. Could you please explain your rooting box method a little more. It sounds amazing that we could do a banana graft after 10 days of rooting.

  • ramv
    commented on 's reply
    Yes, bark slipping means the tree is in active growth. It is a sign that cambium -undifferentiated tissue at the boundary of bark and wood is actively making cells on both sides.
    Bark will not slip if tree is dormant. Often bark won’t slip when tree is under water stress or otherwise not growing vigorously.

  • Jamie0507
    commented on 's reply
    You got it Otis! Im sorry I missed the new posts, otherwise I would have responded sooner.

  • Otis
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks, Jamie. I appreciate your response.

  • Jamie0507
    replied
    Originally posted by Otis View Post
    I know this is an old thread, but I keep referring back to it, because I really like the simplicity of this type of graft. I know that the excellent video shows the flaps on the rootstock slipping as this was done in what looks to be summer, but I wanted to ask if anyone has tried this type of graft on dormant wood, (both stock and scion). Thanks.
    Sorry for missing the new posts here guys! I can answer the million dollar question about whether this can be done on dormant rootstock. From my experience with it, you really need to have your rootstock awake or at least in the process of waking up, and dormant scion is ideal (but not 100% necessary as Ive used both successfully). Now I have also noted your rootstock can be in the early stages of waking up, and it need not be full blown actively growing for the bark to slip. For example, I use this technique all the time with easy to root cuttings that I put into my rooting box maybe a week to 10 days ahead of when I want to graft a more high value scion to and it works like a charm! I also have a couple trees I brought in from my garage that were fully dormant to use as rootstock for this grafting technique recently, and they began to wake up in just 5-7 days in my basement. I was able to do the banana graft on those as well 👍🏼

    Leave a comment:


  • Jamie0507
    commented on 's reply
    Oh man, I missed all the new action on this thread! Sorry for my delay in response Sod! No I don’t do any tap and drill type techniques to hold the scion in place, just the rubber band and parafilm has always done the trick👍🏼 I even do this technique with higher end scion to easy to root cuttings. You just have to wait until the cutting wakes up so the bark is slipping. To be honest I forgot the rubber band before and it healed just fine with only parafilm holding it in place!

  • drbud
    commented on 's reply
    I skin the 4 sides because that is how I did it with pecan trees years ago. Had great success doing it the same way with figs last year.

  • Otis
    commented on 's reply
    Good question, Steve. Hope someone into plant physiology can shed some light.
    Last edited by Otis; 01-21-2020, 09:53 PM.

  • Rewton
    commented on 's reply
    Yes, the bark needs to slip. This brings up another question. With figs does the bark always slip when they are actively growing and not slip when they are dormant? Or is it more complicated than that?

  • BC BYRON
    replied
    For banana grafts what is better, scraping the bark or skinning the four sides?

    Leave a comment:


  • ramv
    replied
    Originally posted by Otis View Post
    I know this is an old thread, but I keep referring back to it, because I really like the simplicity of this type of graft. I know that the excellent video shows the flaps on the rootstock slipping as this was done in what looks to be summer, but I wanted to ask if anyone has tried this type of graft on dormant wood, (both stock and scion). Thanks.
    This won’t work with dormant rootstock.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sod
    replied
    Jaime do you tap and drill your cutting and rootstock or just allow the cambium to hold it in place?

    Leave a comment:


  • Otis
    replied
    I know this is an old thread, but I keep referring back to it, because I really like the simplicity of this type of graft. I know that the excellent video shows the flaps on the rootstock slipping as this was done in what looks to be summer, but I wanted to ask if anyone has tried this type of graft on dormant wood, (both stock and scion). Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • ginamcd
    commented on 's reply
    I angle cut graft my tomato plants and that's how they grow as well even though they start at the same thickness-- the rootstock stays somewhat narrow and the scion stem bulges out right at the union.

  • TorontoJoe
    replied
    For a moment there I expected a banana.....

    Loving the garage. Don’t change a thing!

    Leave a comment:


  • CoolClimateFigger
    commented on 's reply
    That looks so interesting. I wonder if the union will ever blend in.

  • Bluemalibu
    replied
    This is a Manresa that's Banana grafted onto a Texas Blue Giant. The graft is abt 18 months old. When it was first grafted, all of the blades of the graft were closed up, butted up against one another.


    Click image for larger version  Name:	zeAEGZ.jpg Views:	1 Size:	105.6 KB ID:	356451

    Leave a comment:


  • Anniebee
    replied
    Here are my first banana grafts (and first grafts, EVER!) showing some life. First is White Adriatic, the second is Black Mission. Black Mission is also sprouting some leaves on the back of the graft.

    Leave a comment:


  • CoolClimateFigger
    commented on 's reply
    No, it was wrapped. Once I saw that the buds were beginning to swell I took the rest of the plastic wrap off. Hope I didn't mess up.
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