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  • Easy vs Persnickety

    So, I have these cutting rooted and in their cups and they're at various stages of root growth. Some that have been cupped for only 10 or 11 days are ahead of some that have been in the cups for 3 weeks. I'd say it makes no sense, but I'm noticing that different cultivars seem to matter.

    Brown Turkey seems to be a good baseline with steady growth in both foliage and roots.

    Three of the LSU varieties (Scott's Black, Purple, and Champagne) are vigorous and doing well...all are ahead of the BTs that were cupped first.

    The O'Rourkes (2) seem to be very fragile and persnickety, having wilt and die-back and then seem to recover. Their roots are just visible around the bottom edge of the cups. These were two of the first ones cupped on 7/20.

    Atreano (2) were also cupped in the first batch but seem to be very slow to develop. Root ends are just visible around the cup edge and they have been showing signs of budding for 3 weeks but so far nothing. If it weren't for the root tips, I'd think they were dead.

    Smith is going gangbusters. One of the middle batch put into cups (7/31), there are lots of roots and lots of foliage.

    UNK Yellow Greek was also in the last group on 8/3. It is showing roots all around the cup and lots of vigorous foliage.

    Conadria is showing some roots and one tiny leaf. It was in the last group (8/3).

    Abebereira is showing one tiny root at the edge but nothing more since it was cupped on 7/31.

    So...is this normal for these varieties? Being new to figs, I'm curious if these observations are in line with your experiences.
    Bryant...Franklin County, VA...Zone 7a. Wish List: a 32 hour day....more sleep

  • #2
    This is all very normal. There is times that cuttings from the same tree will root and grow at different rates.

    Everything sounds good.
    Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

    “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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    • #3
      I echo Scott. Even two of the same varieties will behave differently. Usually, once you get decent roots in the clear cup, they will take off outdoors in a shaded area during this time of year. Humidity is key.
      Frank ~ zone 7a VA

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      • #4
        Thanks, guys! I'm planning to leave them in the cups until the sides are well covered... Then on to pots and the shade.
        Bryant...Franklin County, VA...Zone 7a. Wish List: a 32 hour day....more sleep

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        • #5
          Good plan.

          Post some pics.
          Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

          “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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          • #6
            Will do that tomorrow morning.
            Bryant...Franklin County, VA...Zone 7a. Wish List: a 32 hour day....more sleep

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            • #7
              Sweet!
              Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

              “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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              • #8
                As promised. Used a white board to get pertinents in the pics.
                You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 7 photos.
                Bryant...Franklin County, VA...Zone 7a. Wish List: a 32 hour day....more sleep

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                • #9
                  Man, you're a pro already! Also, careful to not over-saturate the mix, as it will promote rot.
                  Frank ~ zone 7a VA

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                  • #10
                    Thanks, Frank. No more water until they're too light. The Champagne's root growth is just amazing. From initials to that in just 10 days.
                    Bryant...Franklin County, VA...Zone 7a. Wish List: a 32 hour day....more sleep

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                    • #11
                      Bryant,
                      Thanks for sharing your photos and info.
                      Looks like you're off to a great start...
                      Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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                      • #12
                        Thanks, Pete!
                        Bryant...Franklin County, VA...Zone 7a. Wish List: a 32 hour day....more sleep

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                        • #13
                          Nice job Bryant, like Frank said. ... already a pro!
                          Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                          “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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                          • #14
                            Looks great. Not bad at all for your first go round.
                            Calvin, Wish list is to finish working on the new house, someday.
                            Bored? Grab a rake, paint roller, or a cordless drill and come over!

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                            • #15
                              What's your rooting process?
                              Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

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                              • #16
                                Well, I had received a bunch of cuttings from a couple forum members and some of them were starting to bud out. Rather than try to keep them in the fridge in that state, I opted to try to root the ones showing signs of budding.

                                7/12/2015. Bought a small Sterlite plastic container with a tight lid and some spagnham moss. I rehydrated the moss and got it ready for the cuttings.

                                7/13/2015. Identified the dryer cuttings and dropped them in a glass of water for about 20-30 minutes. Alternated layers of hydrated moss with cuttings. Wrapped dark towel around the whole box and put on top of the China hutch in the kitchen. Cuttings in box: 4 BT, 1 LSU Purple, 1 LSU Champagne, 1 LSU Scott's Black, 1 UNK Yellow Greek, 2 O'Rourke, 1 Conadria, 1 Smith, 2 Abebereira, 3 Atreano.

                                7/20/2015. Checked the cuttings for root sign. Had initials to 1" roots on LSU Purple, 2 BTs, LSU Scott's Black, 2 O'Rourkes, and 2 Atreanos. Cupped these in 2 parts organic potting mix, 1 part peat moss, 1 part vermiculite, 1 part perlite. Did not have dark cups, so wrapped in aluminum foil for light blockage. Put cups in 2ltr bottles and 1gal ziplock scored makeshift humidity chambers. Discovered fuzzy white growing on the tip of one of the Abebereira cuttings, so removed it from the box and disposed of it.

                                7/24/2015. Discovered both O'Rourkes had rot at the top of the cutting and on the new growth. Both has come into contact with the bottle side and the condensation started the rot. Pinched and pruned back the rotted areas. Moved all cuttings to newly purchased inverted 27gal plastic bin for humidification chamber.

                                7/27/2015. Checked box for more roots. Found roots from initials to 2" and cupped UNK Yellow Greek, Conadria, and 2 BTs. Used different mix per advice from this forum: 2 parts vermiculite, 2 parts perlite, 1 part peat moss.

                                7/30/2015. Checked rooting box again and cupped Smith, Abebereira, and 1 Atreano using the newer mix. Only one cutting remains in the box. Removed the cuttings showing foliage growth from humidity chamber to an open topped bin to harden off the humidity. I chose to keep them in the bin instead of loose on the porch because we frequently get winds that sweep the porch...the box is to keep them from being blown everywhere.

                                8/3/2015. LSU Champagne had roots almost 2". Cupped with the newer mix.

                                I confess that I'm guilty of the newbie mistake of babying them too much and I've likely over watered during the process.

                                Not sure if that's what you were asking about, but it's what I did. I didn't do anything special like a rooting compound or scraping the cutting or anything like that. (Although, was told earlier today that ground cinnamon acts as excellent rooting compound...thoughts?)
                                You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 3 photos.
                                Bryant...Franklin County, VA...Zone 7a. Wish List: a 32 hour day....more sleep

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