X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What Cultivar Tastes Figgy?

    Working on my taste profiles. I see descriptions like "just sweet not figgy" I am not sure what is Figgy? Honey, Berry, Melon I can recognize in different figs, but I need a baseline marker for figgy. LDA tastes very rich to me, but I can't really define other than a generic statement of rich, is that Figgy? What cultivars define figgy to you?
    Phil North Georgia Zone 7 Looking for: All of them, and on and on,

  • #2
    For me a fig that has a "figgy" taste is Hardy Chicago. It's sweet with a figgy flavor. I don't know where that flavor description really came from but that's how I see it. I'm sure others have their own description of "figgy flavor".
    Wishlist; Green Michurinska, St. Rita
    Tony
    Sarver, PA Zone 6A.

    Comment


    • #3
      The Figgy flavor is hard to describe, its like a caramel/earthy flavor. My most intense home grown figgy flavor to date has been from a ripe California Brown Turkey aka San Piero fig. Most figs that I've tasted do not have that figgy flavor.

      "Rich" is usually creamy and possibly savory (hints of mixed additional "complex" flavors).

      IMO, Melon flavor (hints of watermelon rind) usually means that the fig (flesh) is not fully ripe.
      Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

      Comment


      • Rafaelissimmo
        Rafaelissimmo commented
        Editing a comment
        That's interesting Pete. I described the flavor of Planera as earthy. I'd never tasted an "earthy" fig before that. It was also rich by the way.

      • AscPete
        AscPete commented
        Editing a comment
        Rafael,
        There are only a few fig varieties that I've tasted that have that 'caramelized sugar / earthy' flavor. San Piero, English Brown Turkey and Brunswick are in that group.

    • #4
      Imagine a person who has never tasted, or even seen, a fresh fig, as was my experience until a few years ago (amazingly, despite living in Central and South Texas, Arkansas, and New Mexico for 10 years - mostly Central and South Texas). Maybe the person has eaten Fig Newtons or dried figs. Somehow, some way, that person tastes a fresh fig, is wowed, and dives head-first, like a human fig wasp, into figs, growing, studying, reading, seeing the word "figgy" appear on the forums and elsewhere as a taste descriptor for figs. What's the flavor of that grape? Grapey. That peach? Peachy. Melon? Melony. Berry? Berryish. Except this person grew up with fresh grapes, peaches, melons, and berries, so might sort of get what is being vaguely conveyed. Not with figgy. This person thinks, Does figgy refer to the kind of musky smell and tar-like taste of Fig Newtons, almost stinky sweet with some molasses aftertaste? Or to the cloying and moist sweet-cardboard taste of dried figs? Hmm...and if so, why does that define "fig" when there are so many other fresh fig flavors that taste like nothing of the sort? Does figgy actually refer to a convergent flavor of figs dried? Then imagine this person grows and tastes dozens of different cultivars of fresh figs, which don't taste dried-fig-like at all but variously like crosses of berries mainly, or of other fruits, mixed with syrups, jams, and gels of diverse (and unknown) origin. Figs taste even of spices, brandies, and, well, of flowers, of the inverted and delicate all-but-liquified flowers that they are. So then this person tastes a Late Bordeaux cultivar, Violette, and then another one, Negronne, and another one, Petite Negri, and discovers some dried fig and molasses taste or aftertaste in common to these fresh figs. Figgy? Do the Late Bordeaux define fig flavor? Then this person tastes one of the early Bordeaux, Ronde, and finds a somewhat similar flavor, though far less so when picked dead ripe. So this person wonders about that other early and larger Bordeaux, Rouge, or Pastiliere. If the echo of dried figs defines figgy as the essential flavor, why do only the Bordeaux among dozens of cultivars exhibit it fresh? In this grower's experience at least. That can't be it, this person thinks, and begins to muse if not conclude that figs taste of flowers of diverse kinds, diverse in color, drenched and absorbed in sweet syrups, jams, and gels, sometimes with mild crunch. What do flowers taste like? Like figs? Like colors? Not flowery. Not exactly. Not most.
      Tony WV 6b
      https://mountainfigs.net/

      Comment


      • AscPete
        AscPete commented
        Editing a comment
        Its quite possible that the 'figgy flavor' that I associate with figs is the Caramelized Sugar flavor of dried figs, but fig flavor can also be described simply as sweet with or without a berry flavor , this simple description will cover all fig varieties.

      • mountainfigs
        mountainfigs commented
        Editing a comment
        And it will cover any number of other fruit varieties. I've never had a ripe peach that wasn't 'sweet'. Fig sweet is different from peach sweet but everyone assumes this or knows it. To say that peaches taste peachy, meaning sweet, and figs taste figgy, meaning sweet, what does that convey? It means the person is eating a ripe fruit, whether fig or peach. That's a reasonable thing to say but it doesn't communicate beyond that, least of all to anyone not much familiar with peaches or figs who is seeking to know about their various flavors or tastes. So is 'figgy' actually more of an indication of degree of ripeness of the fruit than of any specific flavor of the fruit? If so, for those who are trying to learn about the flavor ranges over and within various cultivars of figs, it leaves one hanging.

        I suppose that people are using figgy in multiple ways, sometimes to indicate a sense of characteristic ripeness and other times to indicate a particular flavor association they may have developed with figs but which may be more personal to them than general to figs. It may be too that the figs we are growing have much wider flavor ranges than do other fruits, at least especially as compared to store fruits, which renders even more problematic any characteristic description of figgyness. Close my eyes a few years back prior to experiencing figs, if I were to taste the difference between a Champagne and a Janice Kadota and a Bordeaux, it might not have been at all clear to me that I was tasting the same species of fruit. Sometimes it's not all that clear now.
        Last edited by mountainfigs; 08-15-2015, 09:33 AM. Reason: edited due to the fact that quotation marks are currently dysfunctional on the site but apostrophe marks are not

    • #5
      IMHO, celeste is the classic "figgy" fig. I guess since I grew up eating celeste figs since before I could remember and I didn't try other figs till about 5 years ago or so so I always compare to celeste, which to me has a real "figgy" flavor.
      Last edited by quackmaster; 08-15-2015, 04:53 AM.
      Ryan- CenLa, zone 8a/b

      Comment


      • #6
        Pretty much what I was expecting when I realized I did not know how to define figgy that many of us have our own definition. From what we initially grew accustom to, to a similarity to Fig Newtons, to a taste for dirt
        Phil North Georgia Zone 7 Looking for: All of them, and on and on,

        Comment


        • AscPete
          AscPete commented
          Editing a comment

          Yes, It sums up 'figgy flavor', it's personal.

      • #7
        Do not strive for comprehension of "figgyness". Enlightenment comes differently to each. One may be separating an air layer, another may contemplate an emerging leaf yet another may have just swallowed part of their harvest. Your time will come and you will know that you know.

        As far as a melon taste to figs, to me that's when there's a note of ripe cantaloupe or honeydew. I agree that if a fig tasted of watermelon rind there is probably something wrong with it.
        Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

        Comment

        Working...
        X