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  • Florea

    Another variety worth discussing. Florea is among the hardiest varieties known, surviving temperatures as low as -4F in NJ. Introduced by fig guru herman2, it was brought to America from Serbia where it was grown in his father's garden. In Serbia it reportedly survived temperatures of -13F. In addition to it's hardiness, it is also the earliest to ripen it's main crop most years, usually in late July or early August. It is a sweet fig with a good but not extraordinary taste. It does not do well with rain or cloudy/cool weather.

    During the polar vortex of winter 2013/2014 what is likely the oldest Florea (see photo in the link below) suffered dieback of all secondary branches, the three main trunks survived to about 5' tall. It leafed out in early July and only ripened about 1/3 of it's crop. It should be noted this was an abnormal winter with long stretches of far below average temperatures. It is able to ripen figs the first year after being killed to the ground as per various reports.

    It may be same variety as Mitchurinska10 per xenil/Kristian on f4f. Mitchurinska10 shares many common traits with Florea, and is common in Bulgaria and other Eastern European countries. Bulgarian agricultural authorities report this variety can survive -13F with little to no damage, but this depends on branch thickness.

    Does anyone have pictures to share? Here is herman2's photo of an established specimen during the winter of 2010: http://smg.photobucket.com/user/mirm...r2010.jpg.html
    https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
    SE PA
    Zone 6

  • #2
    Florea and Michurinska-10 is the same fig, the most common in Bulgaria:
    http://palmi.bg/product.php?ProductID=137&UILanguage=EN

    Michurinska-10 is the most common fig variety in Bulgaria. The name was given more than 50 years ago by Radka Serafimova during her scientific research on varieties of figs in Bulgaria. The scientific name is not known among the people and in different regions of the country they call it "The little fig", "Ali Pasha", "Brown", and in places where no other variety can grow - simply "The Fig".
    Variety Michurinska-10 is probably the most cold resistant fig in the world. This is an old Bulgarian local variety that is found only in Bulgaria and some regions of Macedonia, Serbia and Romania. This variety produces main crop on the new shoots. This means that even if it freezes to the ground in colder areas, it will still produce a main crop the following season.
    Variety Michurinska-10 produces abundant crops. This variety is the only one in Bulgaria, which always and each year without exception, gives a good crop of quality fruits.
    In the presence of a male fig - pollinator, Michurinska-10 gives two crops in the summer, one in June and the main crop in late July or early August ( for the plains in southern Bulgaria ). The fruits contiune to ripen until late September, and with the right waether - also until the end of October.
    In the coldest places in the northern and western Bulgaria maturation may be similar to that in southern Bulgaria , but if the plant freezes to the ground every year, it will produce only main crop that may ripe later.
    Damage from cold start at temperatures below -16 to -19 degrees Celsius, and old trees to the ground freeze at temperatures below -22 degrees Celsius. In places with cooler summers, the freeze damage may appear earlier.
    Last edited by greenfig; 02-25-2015, 03:44 PM.
    USDA z 10a, SoCal. WL: De la Roca, Lampeira Prush, Bass’ Favorite Fig, Raspberry Tart, Cavaliere

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    • xenil
      xenil commented
      Editing a comment
      The Ali Pasha said to be a different fig by the original owner Georgi Goshev, I was speaking with him, and he told me this variety has som differences for example the owner states it is rain resistant, and has better fruit quality. A very good friend of mine from Romania, got this variety last year for rooting, now he has a smaller plant,but if its produce fruit this year we can see the differences and the similarities between the Mitchurinksa and this unknown fig.
      And I forgot to mention that the fig wasp is native in Bulgaria, and due to this there are a lot of clones among one
      variety, and can be some differences between the fruit characteristic.
      Last edited by xenil; 02-25-2015, 11:38 PM.

  • #3
    Sounds like another fig i need to add to my future acquisition list How do you know when to stop adding figs to the "list"?

    Kevin (Eastern MA - Zone 5b/6a)

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    • #4
      Originally posted by fitzski View Post
      Sounds like another fig i need to add to my future acquisition list How do you know when to stop adding figs to the "list"?
      This is why I'm getting a Florea as well.

      The way to know. ... there are no more cultivars to collect.
      Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

      “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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      • #5
        Very nice link Igor, I haven't seen that one before!

        Myself, I believe they are the same based on all the evidence but I'll leave it to more qualified growers.

        I should note that herman2 has reported getting brebas after 0F temperatures: http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox....jersey-5377863
        https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
        SE PA
        Zone 6

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        • #6
          0F ! Wow, that is impressive.
          This variety sounds like a must have for the colder climates.

          Anybody has it in the South? How does it do?
          How about California? Any changes/improvements based on pollination?

          I do not have this variety. I wonder if I should try it
          USDA z 10a, SoCal. WL: De la Roca, Lampeira Prush, Bass’ Favorite Fig, Raspberry Tart, Cavaliere

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          • #7
            It's a keeper for me. Florea will ripen loads of figs and my family really likes the taste.
            Art
            Western Pa -6a

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            • #8
              Thanks for the info, Kelby!
              Phil
              Zone 7A - Newark, DE; Zone 8A - Wilmington, NC;

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              • #9
                Art,
                Those are good looking figs!
                Could you describe the taste, please (if you remember )?
                USDA z 10a, SoCal. WL: De la Roca, Lampeira Prush, Bass’ Favorite Fig, Raspberry Tart, Cavaliere

                Comment


                • kubota1
                  kubota1 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  In 20013 I have in my notes that it tasted like honey.
                  Last year I remember using them on pizza. I didn't note the taste. I just rated them on a 10 scale. There were days when I rated them as high as 9 and as low as 6. I don't remember them tasting like honey last year. I think they taste more like a Mt Etna
                  Last edited by kubota1; 02-25-2015, 06:54 PM.

              • #10
                Ironic that a Floridian like myself is looking forward to growing this cultivar in view of the multiple freezes we get here in the northern part of the State.
                Frank Tallahasee 8B
                North Florida Figs

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                • #11
                  Art, do you get a breba crop with Florea and if so is it the same quality as the main crop?
                  Ed
                  SW PA zone 6a

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                  • kubota1
                    kubota1 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Ed, I don't think I got any breba the last couple years.

                  • chuckell
                    chuckell commented
                    Editing a comment
                    my brebas were bigger than the mains ed,

                • #12
                  Here is what I said about her before on a past post. " Florea is such a gem, maybe overshadowed by some in complexity of flavor today, but she has been feeding me for weeks before anyone else was blessing me so she has a place in my heart, kinda like that 1st kiss. " I still feel that same way. How bad are you wanting a fresh fig right now? Those 1st tastes of the season are so anticipated and Florea is that fig. As a midseason fig she is good but might blend into the crowd, but after months without she is a queen.
                  Phil North Georgia Zone 7 Looking for: All of them, and on and on,

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                  • cis4elk
                    cis4elk commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Outstanding description of the quality of this fig!

                  • penandpike
                    penandpike commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Exsactly! Very well said!

                • #13
                  It's main crop ripens here in southern Bristish Columbia, Canada. The earliest variant so far in my collection
                  that ripens around 2nd to 3rd week Sept. Productivity is pretty good too. A keeper here.

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                  • #14
                    Thank you, Phil and Paul.
                    Somebody asked me if a fig can grow in the ground at the 51 degrees latitude in Europe and this might be a fig to try.
                    USDA z 10a, SoCal. WL: De la Roca, Lampeira Prush, Bass’ Favorite Fig, Raspberry Tart, Cavaliere

                    Comment


                    • #15
                      Florea looks like a winner in cold climates. It seems like NC is becoming more like zone 7 than zone 8 lately.
                      Brian
                      Carolina Zone 7b/8a Wanted: Col De Dame

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                      • #16
                        Igor, that is a very interesting bit of info. The leaf shape shown looks very similar to the one that Kerry has been seeing. So far it seems like cuttings propagated from Florea can have two different leaf forms, the more finger like typical one and a rounded form.

                        There was discussion about the two forms in this thread:
                        http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox....shapes-6649061

                        And it looks like it has shown up in the past:
                        http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox....ea-fig-5934023

                        The jury is still out about whether the rounded leaf form is/should be call Florea, but the info on Michurinska-10 adds an interesting twist.

                        I might get fruit from both forms this summer if I'm lucky, maybe others will too. Florea sure is one interesting fig!
                        Andy - Zone 6a Lat 39.9º N, Altitude 5390' Westminster CO ⚘ Scion List

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                        • #17
                          This is one fig that I need to get a replacement for,mine was frozen last year in one of the polar vortexes last year. Was very good.

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                          • #18
                            A very good fig, indeed.

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                            • #19
                              About these two or one fig, I'm planning to plant out my Mitchurinska10 next to my house to test the cold hardiness of this variety. Hopefully the summer will be generous and will give me a big crop. I'll make more photos about the plant, leaf, and fruit and we will see, if it's the same or not.

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                              • #20
                                Some pictures about Ali Pasha.

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                                • GregMartin
                                  GregMartin commented
                                  Editing a comment
                                  Any pictures of the leaves xenil?

                              • #21
                                In my zone, I grow Florea in a large pot with no winter protection. The large pot has many holes drilled on its side. This is to
                                allow the roots to feed into the ground so that I can enjoy its abundance. A friend here grew it directly into ground and provide
                                no winter protection and it does well for him too.

                                Comment


                                • figgrower
                                  figgrower commented
                                  Editing a comment
                                  What zone are you in?

                              • #22
                                Pen Europe, Bulgaria, Zone-6a

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                                • xenil
                                  xenil commented
                                  Editing a comment
                                  Nice photos about the common bulgarian fig variety. Last time when we talked, I forgot to ask you one question about freckled beauty. Do you know is it rain tolerant or not? In this year I'd be happy if you could share more pictures with us about these bulgarian figs

                                • penandpike
                                  penandpike commented
                                  Editing a comment
                                  Not the best in rain I think but not sure. I will have more info next year. And more pic too.

                                • xenil
                                  xenil commented
                                  Editing a comment
                                  Thanks for the info, I hope at this season you'll have more information and picture to share about this variety.

                              • #23
                                Great photos and descriptions, thanks for sharing! Always interesting to hear from folks in this figs native range, we are lucky to have you with us here.

                                Sounds to me as if it could almost be a 'landrace' strain over there, a group of similar individuals evolving in some isolation with native pollinators and human perpetuating selections over the years.

                                That this was occuring in a more temperate climate of central Europe instead of the dry, semi-tropical mediteranean climate is what could make this one so valuable for fig growers in N. America.

                                I have a couple young rooted Florea cuttings I got from a Ohio source, these were some of the slowest to root for me and the growth afterward has also seemed somewhat less vigorous...they were end cuttings which I have found a little more difficult to deal with in general. Two of the cuttings seem to display distinct leaf patterns, similar to other's experiences.
                                Last edited by zone5figger; 02-26-2015, 08:12 AM.
                                Jesse in western Maine, zone 4/5
                                Wishlist- Figues Juane, Demos unk, Nantes Maroc, Thermalito

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                                • #24
                                  Not the greatest photos but I like to keep track of what ripens.

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                                  • #25
                                    Michael,

                                    Nice to see Florea likes Virginia. Heck, it seems to like it anywhere.
                                    Frank ~ zone 7a VA

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