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  • Wills gardens in the nude, finds fig latex leaves rash in odd places: pics attached!

    This thread is actually about my collection of pasty textured, not very sweet, uninspiring figs. The "pasty" description may match Wills' complexion, but we'll have to ask his wife about the accuracy of the remaining descriptors. Alas, I have no photos of Wills to compare to my figs. Be forewarned, I am the written equivalent of a windbag; if you choose to read further, do so when fully awake or, conversely, start reading it to help you fall asleep. Onward!

    I have a largish fig collection and will likely eat figs from 60-70 different varieties this year. While I understand that the fig that was unbelievably good last year can disappoint the next, having approximately 90% (up to this point) of one's entire collection produce inferior figs strongly suggests a uniform underlying reason. I have some suspicions that I'll lay out below and hope others will chime in with their experiences and thoughts. But first come some qualifications.

    I am not new to figs, having grown them for about 10 years now. My collection has, however, grown much larger in the past three or four years, from maybe 20 varieties to about 100 today. My figs are in pots, are stored in my garage for the winter and undergo an extended fig shuffle from mid March until late May/early June -- we occasionally get frost into early June, though the usual last frost is early May. (That last bit is inconsequential to the discussion, but I wanted you all to know my shuffle pain and share your empathetic responses with me.) The bottom line is I've got some experience, but I explore new methods most years in the hope that my trees each season will be more productive and tasty than the previous season.

    The weather this year (and almost every year here) has been good fig growing weather: lots of early sun due to diligent shuffling, decent spring growth, timely fruit set on almost all trees mature enough to bear a crop and a hot summer. My pots are either partially buried or my trees' canopies are large enough to shade neighboring pots, so I doubt hot pots are a big issue. Here are my suspicions, in descending order of probable responsibility for my insipid figs:

    *Most of my collection are in 5-gallon pots. I have maybe 15 trees in 10 or 15 gallon pots and started the season with an additional 20ish varieties rooted last year 2-gallon containers. I root prune on a three year schedule, and this would be year three for most of my trees that wintered over last dormant season in 5-gallon or larger pots. I suspect most of my trees are root bound and wonder if that condition is the big reason for the relative poor quality of my crop. I did up-pot six of my best trees from 5 to 10 gallon pots this year. All but one was up potted in July. Several of those show obvious signs of stress, dropping leaves and fruit, so it's tough to nail down what the largest potential effect is on their fruit quality. Some of them haven't ripened fruit yet, and the one tree I did up-pot to a 10-gallon container in early spring is just now ripening fruit. The same potting up-potting schedule exists for many 2-gallon trees up-potted to 5 gallon containers, making it difficult to pin it down to being root bound. Still, my untouched 5-gallon trees are giving me lots of inferior fruit.

    *I started using Espoma Garden Tone, 3-4-4 ratio, last season, with good results. My initial tree fertilization this year was in late March, followed by a 2nd application in late May and a final application in mid-late July. For the July fertilization I mixed Plant Tone with the Garden Tone, 5-3-3 ratio, at approx 60-40 ratio, hoping for better growth, especially on figs that have been slow growers for me over the years. In retrospect, increasing the nitrogen to promote greater vegetative growth would have been better done with the first fertilization, but I didn't decide to change the fert schedule and purchase the Plant Tone until July. I need more early growth to support a larger crop, since the growing season allows only one main crop. Anybody think that the application of a higher N fert may be contributing to the blah figs? The ingredients are similar from Tone to Tone, it's the quantity of particular ingredients that changes to give them their particular N-P-K ratios. The figs formed long before the final application and the Tones are fairly slow releasing organic ferts, so I'm skeptical that this is a/the reason.

    *My trees were pretty crowded until I spaced them out a bit in early August. I anticipated setting up drip to all my pots, and the installation grew in complexity as I discussed it with a professional until I finally abandoned the idea until dormancy sets in and I can clear the fig area and perform the work without having to move them back and forth a few times. The trees get a minimum of 9-10 hours at one end of the planting area and all day sun at the other, so I don't think lack of sunlight is a cause here even with the crowding.

    I will soon have figs from 2nd year trees in 2-gallon pots begin to ripen. The same is true for 2nd year trees potted up to 5-gallon containers, mostly in early spring. All set fruit a bit later than my more mature trees. While the 2-gal trees will have their roots somewhat crowded in these pots, I don't think the conditions mimic the root bound conditions in most of the older 5-gallon collection. If these figs, which were fertilized the same was as their larger, older relatives, end up being far superior, and there is evidence that this may be the case (see my other titillatingly titled thread), I'll lean even more heavily toward root boundedness being the cause.

    Please share your thoughts.
    Neil
    Reno, 6b

  • #2
    No one is answering because they are embarrassed to admit they clicked on the title...
    Ed
    SW PA zone 6a

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    • #3
      Somebody had to break the ice. Thanks for taking that risk, Ed. There is no shame in possible Wills' voyeurism.
      Neil
      Reno, 6b

      Comment


      • #4
        Im new to figs so others can probably help you more. If your trees are getting root bound before you can get around to root pruning them, if they are partially buried. Couldnt you put some manure in your holes or compost and drill some holes in the bottom of your pots or buckets and every year when you take your trees out just cut the roots off at the bottom of the pots. giving your soil has good drainage.
        Kentucky Zone 6b

        Comment


        • Posturedoc
          Posturedoc commented
          Editing a comment
          Many of my trees are partially buried and have the opportunity for a few roots to escape their pots, but not at the bottom. For whatever reason, most of them don't push roots out into the soil. As to your proposed solution, it's a good one to implement earlier in the season, but with one important revision. Their is a problem with drilling holes into the bottom of your buried pots rather than on the sides or relying on existing drainage holes located where the pot sides meet the bottom. If roots do actually escape the pots from the bottom, you'll have to work a whole lot harder to dig the pots out than if they escape to the side.

          At this point in the season there really isn't a fix root bound pots. Growers will have to wait for dormancy to aggressively root prune their trees late this winter for the next growing season.

      • #5
        I see what your saying about roots coming out the bottom of the pot. It would definitely work better for the roots to grow out the sides. I was thinking you was looking to make changes for next season..
        Kentucky Zone 6b

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        • #6
          What is the media in the pots?
          Paul Robert,Simi Valley,Ca. 9b

          Comment


          • #7
            I clicked on the title knowing the sort of tricks crafty Neil likes to use. I have no desire to see Wills with a rash. Really.

            I don't know but your reasoning seems like a good possibility. I have sometimes wondered if root pruning would be necessary at all if people used something like RootMaker or RootTrapper pots, or some other sort of pot that "pruned" roots (through air-pruning, entrapment, or chemical burning via copper), leading to a fibrous root system without any larger roots that circle around the surface of a smooth pot.

            I have trees that fill up a 5 gallon pot in one year and I'm guessing root-pruning every three years with fig trees in 5 gallon pots is often enough. Maybe you need more back exercise and move to 15 or 20 gallon pots???
            My fig photos <> My fig cuttings (starts late January) <> My Youtube Videos

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            • #8
              What about the water you use to irrigate? Salt/mineral build up? Soil pH after months of irrigation? They are not getting flushed out by rain where you live, are they?

              I was wondering about the pots and roots getting too hot. Or about the size of the pots.
              Ed
              SW PA zone 6a

              Comment


              • #9
                I would suspect root bound to be the major factor, and contributing is that it sounds like you did not get the irrigation setup up on them. I find root bound plants difficult to water from above unless it is a small drip/irrigation stick type setup. I don’t know how you presently water but if it’s just a overhead application the top of pot may appear hydrated, but without much penetration into the rootball. SIPs and submerging pots are a different story I believe but I very little experience with SIPs. I have very little growth on my trees that did not get repotted this year as they were going in ground, but I was late getting them in. Together with that diminished growth was smaller fruit and in many cases fruit of less quality and much more prone to leaf drop, as opposed to last year when everything was freshly up-potted, and that was for the most part in 15 gal pots up-sized from 3-5 gal just last year.
                Last edited by strudeldog; 09-02-2015, 09:37 AM.
                Phil North Georgia Zone 7 Looking for: All of them, and on and on,

                Comment


                • #10
                  Thanks for the replies, folks. Here are my thoughts:

                  *We have a Wills sighting! It appears that someone attached a photo of "Rashy" Wills as my avatar, thankfully with artful rash coverings in place. That is a strange location to post the photo, but it works well enough.

                  *My potting medium is ProMix HP with pine bark fines and pea gravel added using the precise measurement of "hmm, that seems like enough of that stuff, let's add some of this now." It's probably in the neighborhood of 5-1-1, maybe 5-2-1 if I the bag of Soil Pep gets away from me during the pour. I also throw in some dolomite lime, Espoma Garden Tone and, for the first time this year, mixed in a bit of Azomite for it's trace mineral value. I would be surprised if my planting mix is the issue, despite my haphazard approach.

                  *Harvey, I bought 100, 1 gallon Air Pots many years ago thinking to use them as my pots for newly rooted cuttings. They work great in the right place, but in arid Nevada, they dry out much too fast. Scale up the Air Pot and scale up the tree size and you end up in the same place. I need to get rid of 100 1 gallon Air Pots. I had somebody on the other forum interested last year but didn't have my stuff together and let the deal go. Anybody interested in giving them a try, let me know and we'll make a deal. I strongly suggest folks who live in hot, arid climates pass on these unless you can water them all day or use a really heavy medium that might not be well suited for figs. I never tried the latter. Maybe I should keep a few and experiment with them.

                  *I just tested my water. The pH is on the alkaline side of neutral, maybe 7.5 with fairly low mineral content, so acid water and/or mineral buildup in the pots is unlikely. I also do not use liquid synthetic ferts, so mineral buildup from that is not possible. Pot sizes are mostly 5 gallon with a few 7, 10 and 15 gallon pots in the mix plus 2 gallon pots for trees transitioning into larger pots (these trees don't stay in 2-gal pots for longer than one year).

                  *Phil, I appreciate your thoughts on my irrigation setup. I would not be surprised if the conditions you describe exist in a number of the pots with rootbound trees. I hand water daily, sometimes twice a day when temps are around 100 and it's windy, conditions we don't see here too often. When it's 100 degrees, there is usually little wind here. I think the drip system will be a big improvement next year for the trees. It certainly will make my life easier once I figure how much water needs to go to each tree. I forgot to mention that I have 8 trees in 4 gallon SIPs, the same containers you see in photos of Dennis' mammoth collection. Those trees were potted to the SIPs last year, so this is year two for them, and maybe that's too long for trees in SIPs, particularly smallish SIPs. Most of the fruit from these trees has been pretty good. VdB has been consistently been my best fig this season, and I got my first CdDB of the season off of a SIP tree yesterday and it was excellent. However, my Black Bethlehem, which gave me consistently tasty figs last season, has grown poorly and the figs are pasty and insipid, like most I am complaining about. It is probably showing the most obvious signs of being root bound.

                  Great input, everybody.
                  Neil
                  Reno, 6b

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    This is my first year using Azomite as well and I have a lot of insipid figs. Here it rained almost non stop for 3 months so I thought the Azomite might be a good idea. Now I'm not sure. There's no evidence any of mine are rootbound.
                    Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      I did a brief search on how Azomite affects flavor and came up with some interesting information, most of it in the way of testimonials that claim flavor is much improved in tomatoes. Testimonials are hardly scientific. I ended up at the Azomite website and looked at some of their "research" which is interesting enough but hardly definitive as it doesn't list where these studies are published. Still, it's better than testimonials. They list one "study" performed in Texas which claims that fig tree yields increased 50% compared to trees not given Azomite. There was no commentary on flavor and texture. Attached is the link, which is simply a couple of captioned photos - looks like Celeste to me. (Edit: for whatever reason, I can't link the the actual page with the fig study results, so you'll have to navigate to the Studies and Tests button under the Research heading)

                      A more intensive search would likely produce better information, but I don't have time for that right now and anyway, the hypothesis behind Azomite is sound - basically adding trace elements to soil that were lost due to poor farming practices of the past or adding it to soil or, in potted fig culture, a medium that never contained them in the first place so that they are available to the microbes that feed the plant. I can't see how adding Azomite would produce poor flavor, but maybe figs are particularly sensitive creatures and give us the best flavor when conditions, from soil to water, are less than ideal. I doubt that's the case, but figs are anything but consistent in production and flavor at my place.
                      Neil
                      Reno, 6b

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        One thing I did notice is that my figs got a lot better after a string of cold nights in the upper 50s. Coincidence? Maybe that scared them? How cold are your nights getting?
                        Last edited by Harborseal; 09-02-2015, 08:38 PM.
                        Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

                        Comment


                        • noss
                          noss commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Bob, Could you explain what cold is? I don't think that happens much where I live. I think I remember someone saying that word a long time ago, in a galaxy far, far, away............

                          noss

                      • #14
                        We've probably been between 55 and 62 degrees for the past 10 weeks with a few low 50 temps here and there. We saw 48 degrees on Sunday night and 49 degrees on Monday. We're supposed to hit 41 degrees on Saturday night before slowly returning to the 50+ realm. We won't likely see high 50s again this year unless a real heat wave hits in the next couple of weeks.
                        Neil
                        Reno, 6b

                        Comment


                        • #15
                          Those are night time lows, right? What are your daytime highs running?
                          Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

                          Comment


                          • #16
                            They were in the low 90s for most of August but are heading as low as 70 by Saturday before warming back to the mid 80s next week. Pretty normal for this time of year. Reno high temps are in the 90s from mid June through August with occasional fluxuations into the mid 80s or around 100 until Sept., when we start seeing fluxations like I described in my first sentence. It's pretty good fig growing weather. Hot and dry.
                            Neil
                            Reno, 6b

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                            • #17
                              I agree with the idea that your pots maybe root bound and or not getting enough water. I've never had leaves drop, but have had figs drop from lack of water to root bound trees. Most fig cultivars will outgrow 1 gallon containers within 1 season and are usually up-potted to 5 gallon buckets, which are root bound by the 2nd year.

                              I'm a relative newbie, have trialed the 5-1-1 mix in 5 gallon buckets from the start and found that it will not retain enough water for healthy continuous growth especially when there is a decent canopy of leaves. Adding 1 part Calcined clay increased water retention and added trace mineral as a benefit but actively growing trees still needed more water even when hand watered twice per day at my location. I've since started using mixes with increased proportions of Peat Moss.

                              Increased Nitrogen in the fertilizer will increase vegetative growth, but only if its readily available to the tree and in my observations have not affect the figs negatively. I use water soluble fertilizers (Miracle-Gro) before bud break and during early growth for the increased readily available nutrients. Espoma Garden-tone is used for the Beneficial Microbes and the "slow" release of nutrients, since it takes time for the microbes to become active and breakdown the ingredients to their readily available nutrients.

                              Measuring fertilizers and supplements with measuring cups to be able to duplicate results is my usual practice and I have found that adding @ 1/4 cup of Ironite as a supplement increases the overall health of the leaves and figs. I use dolemite limestone @ 1/2 cup per 5 gallon bucket, but have also started adding Gypsum @ 1/4 cup / 5 gallon of mix for the readily available Calcium. Garden-tone is added at the start of the season @ 1 cup per 5 gallon bucket along with the supplemental Miracle-Gro. Good Luck.
                              Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

                              Comment


                              • eboone
                                eboone commented
                                Editing a comment
                                not to hijack Neil's thread, but Pete, do you think that Calcium Chloride would be at all useful for figs - I bought some to help my potted tomatoes with blossom end rot and was impressed with how well they responded, CaCl in water used to water and spray the plants with.

                              • AscPete
                                AscPete commented
                                Editing a comment
                                Ed,
                                I've never used Calcium Chloride (Food Grade) as a supplement, but read about its uses as a foliar spray for fruit trees. Gypsum or Dolemite Limestone has always worked for Blossom End Rot, the gypsum is more readily absorbed by the plants while Limestone may take weeks to breakdown but will last for months, depending on size of the particles. Care should be observed with salts like Calcium Chloride due to the negative effects of excess amounts, which are very small in actual volume.

                              • Posturedoc
                                Posturedoc commented
                                Editing a comment
                                I appreciate your thoughts, Pete. I may try one or two of your strategies, but I'm unlikely to be as precise as you are, just too much to do to take the time to measure out everything exactly, at least while mixing my stuff. Maybe if I had a cement mixer like some here have I'd take more time to be specific with the measurements, but it's a wheelbarrow and a shovel or, for larger volumes, a tarp, and I always seem to be in a hurry to get to the next thing on my long garden list to take the extra time to be exacting in my measurements. It only hurts me, but I can live with my somewhat careless ways for now.

                            • #18
                              I'm not Pete but limestone, which figs love, is primarily calcium bicarbonate or baking soda. Too much of a good thing will kill your plant, however.
                              Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

                              Comment


                              • #19
                                Originally posted by AscPete View Post
                                Garden-tone is added at the start of the season @ 1 cup per 5 gallon bucket along with the supplemental Miracle-Gro. Good Luck.
                                Pete, are you doing this with established pots from the previous year or as part of the mix for a repot/up-pot? If for established last year, do you just scratch it into the surface 1-2" of media?
                                Neil, the only thing I keep thinking is that direct sun on leaves=sugar and flavor. But the figs growing on the upper more exposed limbs should still be sweet, and it seems like this is a universal problem for you. Maybe trying a bit of leaf removal so the sun hits the figs as well could help, but I still find it hard to believe that isn't already happening to some degree anyway.
                                As far as Azomite goes, I've been using it for 3 years now and have no problems with insipidation of my figs.

                                Calvin, Wish list is to finish working on the new house, someday.
                                Bored? Grab a rake, paint roller, or a cordless drill and come over!

                                Comment


                                • AscPete
                                  AscPete commented
                                  Editing a comment
                                  The fertilization is done with both established and new pots and is usually mixed in to the top layer of mix. For established trees the solid fertilizer sometimes has to be added to 1 - 2 cups of peat moss or potting mix and added to the top of the containers

                                • Posturedoc
                                  Posturedoc commented
                                  Editing a comment
                                  Some of my trees removed a few of their own leaves, though for all but one of them that was transplant shock. Two of those are now ripening their first figs, so we'll see how they taste. That is not the same as one of my root bound trees losing leaves and ripening fruit, but it's the best I have right now.

                                  Since I started this thread, most of my trees are ripening better quality fruit, though LSU Gold is uniformly tasteless paste and Excell is only a little better. LSU Gold produced it's first figs for me last year - they were excellent - and grew like a rocket. It took the greatest advantage of having its pot planted last year and threw out really thick roots (one was 1/2 inch in circumference and a couple of others 1/3 inch). I thought maybe there would be plenty of room in the pot this year (never checked), since much of it's energy clearly went to the roots exiting the pot, but I must have figured wrong because it put on comparatively little new growth this year and though the crop is decent, the quality is terrible.

                                  My 3rd or 4th year Excell was set back last year when it broke off a few inches above the soil level and didn't ripen any fruit. All of it's fruit thus far has been poor quality, disappointing as this is the first fruit I've had from it.

                                  The dialogue here plus a few higher quality figs this week off of non-root bound trees has solidified in my mind that the primary problem is root crowding and the 2ndary problem was likely tree crowding through July. Next season I expect superior figs due to root pruning, a better fert plan, less crowding and drip irrigation. I'll also prune the trees more aggressively as I put them away for the season and perhaps a further cut in late winter to produce a greater flush of spring growth.

                                  I have been a frugal top pruner in the past, thinking my historically slow growing trees needed as much wood to begin the season as possible in order to produce the best crop for me - pretty dumb considering the main crop comes from this season's growth and dormant pruning promotes greater spring growth than no pruning, a technique I've practiced out in my orchard for years. I've solved most of my overall growth issues through a better fert scheme, but I do want to see much better early season growth so my main crop fruit set is increased beyond what I have now. I doubt I'll reach Pete's reported cropping levels, but 3/4 of his yield per tree would satisfy me and many family members and friends.

                              • #20
                                Neil,
                                My "cropping levels" are solely based on utilizing the Japanese Pruning techniques for establishing the scaffold and yearly pruned fruiting branches. I've not created any new methods or fertilization techniques, simply measured the dosage and documented the results on small volumes so that it could be applied and scaled up.

                                IMO, your planned implemented changes should make a difference next season. Yearly pruning of designated branches after establishing the permanent main and scaffold branches along with good culture will almost ensure a guaranteed crop each season. Attached are some of the"fruiting branches" on some potted fig trees.
                                You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 6 photos.
                                Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

                                Comment


                                • #21
                                  My figs have gotten a lot better recently, too. The thing we have in common was the public shaming of our trees so that must be why.
                                  Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

                                  Comment


                                  • #22
                                    Pete,
                                    Again unlike in my orchard (apples, pears, various stone fruits), I have not practiced a systematic pruning system for my figs. I started out thinking I'd grow everything in a bush form, but find that unwieldy for garage storage as my collection has grown - stacking bush-pruned pots is perilous - and began pruning most of my figs to a tree form, but I have much reworking to do on my older trees. Still, some of my tree-pruned figs put on disappointing crops this year, LSU Purple for one. It had many more figs as a 2nd year tree last year than it has this year, though that might be the root crowding at work again. I also did not prune it back aggressively last winter. My two 2nd year Smith trees grew like the @@@@ens last year but didn't fruit. This year they are relavely huge but carry a poor fruit load and didn't grow as much as they did last year even though one was potted to a larger vessel (from 5-gal to 7-gal, so not a huge jump).

                                    There are other examples of the same but even more examples of my newer and likely less root bound trees putting on lots of fruit, even though relatively small. Bourgessotte Gris and Panache are two examples. I simply need to be more systematic, which will likely entail reducing the size of my collection, giving up a couple of my other extracurricular activities in February and March to make time for the fig prep work at that time of year or retiring early. That is tempting...but unlikely. I'll explore some of your old technical posts and refine my pruning methods to match your own and report back in a year.
                                    Neil
                                    Reno, 6b

                                    Comment


                                    • AscPete
                                      AscPete commented
                                      Editing a comment
                                      After reading through the fig forums and trialing many of the posted recommendations I've reached conclusions that are similar to yours, for potted fig culture regular root and branch pruning will maintain vigorous growth and production in smaller sized containers (5 - 10 gallon) and Bare Rooting is only necessary at longer intervals (4 - 5 years). Yearly root pruning to reduce the size of the root ball and encourage new feeder roots in the same sized containers and branch pruning to remove the yearly fruiting branches back to the closest scaffold branch nodes usually results in maintained increased production.

                                      I've also concluded that training and pruning should be the priority in the 1st and 2nd years of growth to establish the main and scaffold branches. With a well aerated mix used for the 1st year of growth (during initial establishment of the mains and scaffolds in 1 gallon containers) and a denser mix used after the 2nd year for more water retention and slower root growth to maintain the yearly fruiting branches.

                                  • #23
                                    Could the pots just be getting too hot? That would more likely cause overall plant health decline, but perhaps it will impact flavor. Never been to Reno, but I imagine lots of hot sun.
                                    https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
                                    SE PA
                                    Zone 6

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                                    • #24
                                      It's plenty hot, Kelby, but most of my 5 gallon+ pots are buried 1/2 way and the rest are shaded by the overall canopy, so I don't believe that is an issue.
                                      Neil
                                      Reno, 6b

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