X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Baby Fig possible to grow indoor in winter ?

    My neighbor has got two baby figs from his friend who propagated some figs in May, he asked me if he keeps the two baby figs in his family room with a lot of lights etc. from now on till next summer etc. the baby figs will go dormant in winter or continue to grow without dormant because inside is warm. Can anyone let me know so I can tell my neighbor accordingly.
    Thanks...............

  • #2
    Last winter was very warm in Los Angeles and about half of my young figs that were not tuned to seasons yet decided to keep growing and not to go dormant. No issues I could find in my case, they are still happily growing. They were outside and we had no frost.
    USDA z 10a, SoCal. WL: Raspberry Tart, Boysenberry Blush

    Comment


    • #3
      They would continue to grow. Getting enough light for them to grow well could be challenging/expensive and pests like spider mites, fungus gnats, etc. could become an issue.

      I grew newly rooted cuttings inside from October to April last year.
      Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Zaffiro, Moro de Caneva, Nerucciolo d'Elba, Bordissot Blanca Negra, Rubado

      Comment


      • rusty hooks
        rusty hooks commented
        Editing a comment
        Like Don said......more than just bringing them inside.....just don't let them freeze...poor babies

    • #4
      It can be done, but even the brightest, sunniest windows, will only give the small fig trees just a percentage of what they would be getting if they were outside, in a full-sunlight exposure. And, as Don (post #3) points out, there are other things to worry about.

      That being said, I have successfully overwintered a few small fig trees in a very bright kitchen, and place the fig trees right next to sliding glass doors that allow a full, eight hour's worth of sun to fall on the trees/leaves, however, NYC has many, many, dark, dreary days, throughout the winter months. The trees lived, but new growth was pale and weak. Growing trees inside cannot compare to growing trees outside. But sometimes you don't have a choice, and you do what you have to do. Good luck.


      Frank

      Comment


      • #5
        Hi All,

        Noted with many thanks. Have passed on your comments to my neighbor and looks like he will put the young figs indoor in winter to let them continue to grow indoor rather than to put them in the garage (unheated) for dormant. Thanks.............

        Comment


        • #6
          I apologize for reviving this old post but I just want to ask if the responses here are the current best advice?
          I have three late summer rooted cuttings that have a leaf or two each. I searched for info on whether to keep them in the house in a southern window or attempt to let them go dormant in the garage with the rest of the potted figs. I’m new at this.
          Thanks for the advice.
          Central IL Z6a
          WL: Roots on the nice cutting I have!

          Comment


          • #7
            Info is pretty accurate. You can grow it indoors but don't expect much fruit, and slower growth.
            Usually I like to start cuttings in December/January because around that time of year, we start getting more daylight time everyday (1 minute per day roughly) and cuttings don't need light to grow roots. By the time the cuttings start leafing out (Late January/February) I place it by a Window and they grow very well.

            Your late summer cuttings should survive if you have a nice size window that faces the sun.

            Comment


            • #8
              Thank you for the input. I wanted to keep them safe and thought if the were in the house they wouldn’t get lost in the conglomeration of overwintering figs, citrus, avocados, etc in the garage. They’ll go out in the spring as soon as its time.
              Central IL Z6a
              WL: Roots on the nice cutting I have!

              Comment


              • #9
                I keep my potted figs in the house. They don't all go dormant. If they continue to grow they need lots of light or they will grow tall and thin with few nodes. If that happens you can always prune them back later for a more desireable shape. As long as they have some leaves they will have a head start when you put them outdoors in spring. This helps with figs that need a longer season to ripen fruit.
                7B Southern NJ

                Comment


                • #10
                  I have often kept rooted cuttings or very small plants inside by a coolish window throughout the winter without any real problems. The day-length here in mid-winter is very short, so they hardly grow at all, - a sort of suspended animation - but they keep their green leaves and take off when conditions improve. The only thing to watch out for, as others have noted, are fungus gnats (that's why I'm experimenting with mats on top of the soil, aimed at keeping them out).

                  I believe many people are faced with this situation: what to do with very small non-dormant plants at the beginning of winter ...
                  Don, Danmark

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Thanks everyone
                    Central IL Z6a
                    WL: Roots on the nice cutting I have!

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X