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  • Maine Fig Trial

    • 19 - Evaluation of Hardy Fig Varieties in a Northern New England High Tunnel. Saturday, 3 to 5 p.m., Singing Nettle Farm, 138 Woodsong Drive, Brooks, Maine. Join us on the farm for a free presentation of a two year SARE funded research project to assess the viability of growing figs in a high tunnel in mid-coast Maine. Observe four different varieties of figs that have successfully overwintered in our high tunnel. (207) 505-0763; www.singingnettlefarm.com
    Jesse in western Maine, zone 4/5
    Wishlist- earliest maincrop varieties

  • #2
    Copied from Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association website, an open house at an organic farm trialling figs in a hoop house.
    Maybe I will pay them a visit to see how they are doing. Kerry(drivewayfarmer) supplied the initial planting stock for the project.
    Jesse in western Maine, zone 4/5
    Wishlist- earliest maincrop varieties

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    • #3
      that's up there. I keep forgetting that there is a lot more of Maine past Portland
      Hi my name is Art. I buy fig cuttings-so I can grow more figs-so I can sell more figs-so I can buy more fig cuttings-so I can grow more figs....

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      • #4
        Is that next Saturday Jesse? If so and you go please report back. I'm booked up for next weekend or else I'd go for sure. Any which varieties they trialed? Thanks
        Greg, Maine, zone 5. Wish List: Green Michurinska

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        • #5
          Yes, next Saturday is the open farm day. Kerry mentioned the varieties to me, if memory serves they were MBVS, Sal's, RDB, Gino's.
          Not sure I'll be able to make it either, but headed past that way today and might just drop in. Interesting project, and that they received 15K to fund it!
          Jesse in western Maine, zone 4/5
          Wishlist- earliest maincrop varieties

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          • GregMartin
            GregMartin commented
            Editing a comment
            That could have been you Jesse! The interesting thing will be if they can demonstrate a decent return. You can see farmers supplying restaurants along the coast at a decent price.

        • #6
          They will also be presenting their findings at the Common Ground Fair on Friday, and should have figs for sampling at that point as well!
          Jesse in western Maine, zone 4/5
          Wishlist- earliest maincrop varieties

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          • #7
            Handing out samples would be great. Didn't take them long to get enough of a harvest to make that possible.
            Greg, Maine, zone 5. Wish List: Green Michurinska

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            • #8
              I talked a bit with one of the farmers about the trial, they did over winter most of the plants successfully in their unheated high tunnel, but did have 100% die back both winters. Some were wrapped in remay, this didn't make a difference. Wood shavings, corn stalks/husks might have done better, but with lows below -20 F, who knows.
              She didn't sound too sure as to whether they would continue the project now that the trial is officially coming to a close, which would be a pity since we know that fig plants need longer than 2 years to show their true potential, particularly in challenging conditions. Hope to sample their fruit in a couple weeks at Commonground fair!
              Jesse in western Maine, zone 4/5
              Wishlist- earliest maincrop varieties

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              • #9
                Love to go but 14 hour drive. *sigh*
                Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Zaffiro, Moro de Caneva, Nerucciolo d'Elba, Bordissot Blanca Negra, Rubado

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                • #10
                  I'll bet tunnel ripened figs taste awesome with the ability to keep the soil drier. No worry about spoiling from the rain, either!
                  https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
                  SE PA
                  Zone 6

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                  • #11
                    Was there detail on the High Tunnel on that page I missed? If all goes as planned within a year I will have a High Tunnel up and looking for any info
                    Phil North Georgia Zone 7 Looking for: All of them, and on and on,

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                    • Kelby
                      Kelby commented
                      Editing a comment
                      What do you want to know Phil? Shoot me an email, I worked with them a bit in school. PennState has a lot of research into high tunnels as well: http://extension.psu.edu/plants/plas...s/high-tunnels

                      And hey, raspberries are less afflicted by SWD in tunnels, I'm sure figs too.

                    • strudeldog
                      strudeldog commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Kelby,

                      Thanks I will add that to the info I have been reading, was interested if they detailed how they worked their figs in the High Tunnel.

                    • Kelby
                      Kelby commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Bass has a big fig planted in his greenhouse. Not quite the same idea, but maybe he has some pointers?

                  • #12
                    I assume that after the figs go dormant that it would be best to use white plastic on the tunnel to keep the wind off the plants and to keep the temperature constantly cold so the plants stay dormant. Earth bermed might be good too to keep the temp from going too low. Then you'd just have to worry about rodents.
                    Greg, Maine, zone 5. Wish List: Green Michurinska

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                    • #13
                      Here's a link Kerry (drivewayfarmer) sent me earlier this year, they are in Rhode Island but they grow their figs in a greenhouse.

                      http://www.newenglandvfc.org/2013_co...own%20Figs.pdf
                      Kevin (Eastern MA - Zone 5b/6a)

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                      • strudeldog
                        strudeldog commented
                        Editing a comment
                        That's some good info. I am 7a but don't have the moderating Ocean local, very fluctuating particular in spring. I will be doing in ground and see they are dealing with SWD themselves

                      • fitzski
                        fitzski commented
                        Editing a comment
                        I have an unheated greenhouse where all my figs go in the winter and I wrapped some of them in remay row cover and those figs appeared to wake up earlier than the others that were not covered.

                        I plan on wrapping as many as I can this year to give them a little more protection from the bitter cold.

                        My GH bottomed out in the low 20's last year but I had no dieback on any of the figs. Some just slept longer than others.

                    • #14
                      A write up by the farmers-
                      this HTML class. Value is http://www.mofga.org
                      this HTML class. Value is http://www.mofga.org
                      Jesse in western Maine, zone 4/5
                      Wishlist- earliest maincrop varieties

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                      • #15
                        This link should get you directly there.

                        http://www.mofga.org/Publications/Ma...3/Default.aspx
                        Kevin (Eastern MA - Zone 5b/6a)

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                        • zone5figger
                          zone5figger commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Thanks Kevin!

                      • #16
                        Nice shout out to drivewayfarmer in the article.
                        Kevin (Eastern MA - Zone 5b/6a)

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