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  • Lancaster Unknown Italian, anyone have ID guesses?

    I finally got to sample a fig off an unknown Italian that I salvaged from a new homeowner couple ripping out all the fig trees on their property. Like my other recent harvests, this one ripened with two storms dumping water on it. I had to pick it bit early since it was starting to crack and split. The fig had a nice mild sweetness which lingered on my tongue for a while and a distinct raspberry-ish flavor. The people who gave me the tree said that the fig was really sweet (though they were by no means fig connoisseurs considering they ripped out 7 mature trees to plant a vegetable garden), so I have hopes this one will be a flavor bomb when ripened in better conditions.

    Anyone have any guesses to an ID? A positive ID wins you my eternal gratitude and massive positive fig karma. Actually any reasonable guess will get you the same thing. Telling me this is a Brunswick or a Brown Turkey on the other hand will earn an evil glare and several curses.
    You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 6 photos.
    Johnny
    Stuff I grow: Google Doc

  • #2
    Looks like a Chicago hardy-Mt. Etna type from the characteristic sword leaf pattern. The fruit is somewhat consistent, too but looks split and difficult to absolutely confirm.With a few more samples of fruit it may be easier to confirm, but that is my guess ( also thinking of abundance of that type of fig around here).

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    • #3
      I'm with Bill, seems to look like a Mt Etna type. Doubt it's Brunswick or Brown Turkey .
      https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
      SE PA
      Zone 6

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      • #4
        I thought Mt Etna type as a possibility also. The fruit is a lot smaller than my Hardy Chicago though, which ripened several fruit twice the size of this one. The remaining few fruit on the tree look like they will also be similarly small if/when they ripen. Also, every fig on the tree is pointing up, which is different than my other Mt Etnas, which set most of their figs angled out more. I wasn't sure if this is normal Mt Etna-type fruiting habit.

        The fruit set a little on the late side this year. If more ripen in time, I'll post more fruit pics.
        Johnny
        Stuff I grow: Google Doc

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        • #5
          I noticed that growth pattern, too, which is not consistent. There is some variation even within the "family" of mt. Etna in terms of size, but the upward growth is something I can't explain.

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          • #6
            Shouldn't Hardy Chicago have a closed eye. Looks kind of open in the pics.
            Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Zaffiro, Moro de Caneva, Nerucciolo d'Elba, Bordissot Blanca Negra, Rubado

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            • #7
              Johnny,
              I have to agree that your unknown has similarities to the Mount Etna Types, this group has dozens of different cultivars but is synonymous with Hardy Chicago. The flavor profile, leaf shapes and growth habits are similar, but the fig is slightly smaller with a larger eye than typical, but it may be due to culture and older trees will usually develop larger and better figs.

              The fig shape size and length of stem are directly related to culture, growing environment and can differ from year to year on the same tree. Attached are photos of Hardy Chicago figs on the fruiting branches, the eyes are mostly facing upwards with the figs drooping as they enlarge and ripen.
              You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 1 photos.
              Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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