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  • SWD protection with nylon footies?

    I don't know if any of the figs I've had spoil on me have been due to SWD or not, haven't noticed any larva until I looked closely at some dried on the tree NdA the other day. They still tasted good, what the heck. Nick is with me on that, a little bug never hurt anyone. Okay, forget about the stomach bug I got a couple of months ago in Nicaragua.

    Anyways, several years ago I read about the use of footies for coddling month protection on apples, etc. with an article by the Home Orchard Society up in Oregon or Washington. I bought some from them for some apples and they worked well, if I got around to putting them on! I've used some to protect figs from birds and they work "okay". Bass reported they don't work and swore by organza bags for that purpose but I know from photos that those have a high failure rate also. I have little doubt that the footies would do a superior job at keeping out SWD and they are pretty cheap. I think I bought a case of them (maybe 144 x 12 boxes?) for about $60 or something like that a couple of years ago. Anyways, I thought I would mention this to folks to consider if they are having a bad problem with SWD.

    I also wonder about resistant varieties. I would think a thicker skin type fig would have a pretty good chance of avoiding damage. Thoughts?
    My fig photos <> My fig cuttings (starts late January) <> My Youtube Videos

  • #2
    When I was fig raiding it seemed thin skinned varieties spoiled faster (on the plant) but all varieties regardless skin thickness spoiled in a day or so of picking.
    https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
    SE PA
    Zone 6

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    • #3
      Lol, "They still tasted good." That's a true fignatic right there. I don't think I could bring myself around to eating them.
      Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Zaffiro, Moro de Caneva, Nerucciolo d'Elba, Bordissot Blanca Negra, Rubado

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      • #4
        I have had the issue with SWD with both thick and thin skin varieties. The one
        that they have attacked the most is Carini, which is thin skin. I have also had
        them pretty heavy on Black Madeira, Petite Negri, Col de Dame Grise, Malta Black
        Abicou, Salce, Takoma Violette, Ginos Black and Lebanese Red. This represents
        many different skin types but most of all, these are all mid to late producers
        in my area for this year. As for the organza bags, the SWD seem to find a way
        to get that first female into the eye and do her thing.
        newnandawg 7b Newnan, GA

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        • #5
          Good orchard care of picking all figs, removing any spoiled ones, raking up dead leaves, along with bagging every ripening fig and spraying with Spinosad has really helped my SWD issue. I still have two trees that they really love, my Sodus Sicilian and my Negronne. I'm not sure what makes these two different, but one has thick skin, the other thin. I think the organza bags work very well, but you need to bag early! That might explain my Negronne issue as they darken prior to the swelling stage.
          Youtube: PA Figs eBay: tdepoala
          Wishlist: Galicia Negra, Paritjal Rimada, Black Ischia UCD

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          • #6
            I have posted several times that the apple maggot /coddling moth nylon footy bags work great for keeping SWD out of figs. Just wrap the open end tightly around the stem and branch and tuck it under like grafting tape. Figs with cracked skin and open eyes were the only ones they bother here.
            They haven't been bad here at all this year. The Arctic -14 degree blast we had last November killed many fruit trees and almost all the fruit trees blossoms. So no fruit around = tough year for SWD

            I'm still getting spoiled raspberries, but haven't had much time to pick them. Could be regular fruit flies, I don't know. The Japanese beetle have been hitting the raspberries pretty hard too, leaves and ripening fruit. I was out the other night and didn't see any SWD in the raspberries with the headlamp.
            Calvin, Wish list is to finish working on the new house, someday.
            Bored? Grab a rake, paint roller, or a cordless drill and come over!

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            • #7
              Calvin,

              It's interesting that I'm not really that far from you (less than 100 miles I'm guessing), yet I have neither of those pests (thus far knocking on wood!!!). It make me wonder why (elevation, lack of exposure, lack of food (less agriculture near me) drier as well, you get more precipitation that I do)
              Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

              “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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              • #8
                What in the heck is SWD?
                Dennis
                Charlotte, NC /Zone 8a

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                • #9
                  https://youtu.be/JHOQ45Wg0yQ
                  Youtube: PA Figs eBay: tdepoala
                  Wishlist: Galicia Negra, Paritjal Rimada, Black Ischia UCD

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                  • #10
                    Found my first SWD larvae in figs tonight, in 2 Chiappetta figs. The other 6 varieties we tried tonight were fine...but all the trees are next to each other
                    Ed
                    SW PA zone 6a

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                    • #11
                      I keep looking and have not seen any creepy crawllies yet but did find some dried larva of some sort in some dried fig a few weeks ago. Amazing how close most normal fig parts look like larva but I figure it they don't move and the fig doesn't smell it's good to go!
                      My fig photos <> My fig cuttings (starts late January) <> My Youtube Videos

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                      • eboone
                        eboone commented
                        Editing a comment
                        The one fig tasted fine but the other was pretty sour - did not eat the second one

                    • #12
                      I'm hoping this is just bad year. I don't think I have ever seen them before this year. I moved from one end of town to the other although I went from a more urban area to a more wooded area with more property. Now I'm under attack from everything.

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                      • #13
                        I saw this message from a CRFG member here in NorCal who is a commercial grower of cherries who is on a state committee addressing cherry pests, etc. This sounds promising!



                        A new approach to the problem involves the use of GMO's to help rid us of this now ubiquitous pest. In the past,localized infestations of introduced pests like Med Fly have been irradicated by the release of irradiated (sterile) males into the environment. They mate with the wild females which will subsequent have no offspring. This works for minor infestations in quarantined areas. but the SWD is now found all over. The problem with irradiated SWD males is that it renders them less robust than their wild male counterparts so the females will continue to reproduce.
                        Researchers at Cal Tech have found a GMO that can be used to altered SWD males so that any females that mate with these males will produce only male offspring. It's only a matter of time that the population dies out. Furthermore, the system has a failsafe mechanism that can turn off the process if something unintended occurs. The project is initially funded by Cal Tech (not a mega -corp like Monsanto) with some supplementary dollars from the relatively small Califonia cherry growers group.
                        Is there any risks? Possibly, but please remember that this innovative way of managing pests does not rely on any pesticide use. The present, direct application of pesticides on our food may be a greater threat to us than the use of a GMO to alter a gene or two of an introduced, unwanted pest. It seems that some pretty smart scientists have come up with a well-thought out plan that offers potential for the complete erradication of SWD in our area.
                        My fig photos <> My fig cuttings (starts late January) <> My Youtube Videos

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                        • #14
                          I was able to spot some on my cherry tomatoes. I haven't seen any in the raspberries or figs yet.

                          It's my own fault for the tomatoes. I try to pick off and dispose of any spoiled fruit but there has been so much fruit that I've been kind of lax about it.

                          They seem to favor the split over ripe tomatoes.

                          I was wondering. Do they infest fruit that isn't ripe or at the peak of ripeness? Or do they just infest rotting fruit?
                          Last edited by don_sanders; 09-27-2015, 12:57 PM.
                          Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Zaffiro, Moro de Caneva, Nerucciolo d'Elba, Bordissot Blanca Negra, Rubado

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                          • jkuo
                            jkuo commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Most fruit flies infest overripe fruit. The evil thing about SWD is that they infest fruit before it's ripe, so by the time it's ripe, you've got wigglers in your fruit. I'm contemplating ripping out a raspberry patch because I can't keep up with the fruit and it's totally infested.

                          • don_sanders
                            don_sanders commented
                            Editing a comment
                            *sigh* I guess I'll be cutting my cherry tomatoes open from now on. Hope they don't make it to the figs. I don't have many of them.
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