X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Propagation Technique Question

    Does anyone, as a normal matter of procedure, drill holes in the side of the cup. Not the bottom but the sides, for the purpose of letting oxygen in. It would have a similar effect hopefully of being like a clay pot, which breathes a little more. But you can still see through it to observe root development. I do realize it will cause the perlite (or whatever medium is being used), to dry out faster. But it would let oxygen in. Somebody must have tried this? Please let me know what has happened. Or I'll let you know. Cause I'm going to try it unless someone has done it and can tell me it doesn't work. Thanks

  • #2
    Sorry, This is for rooting cuttings. I just realized I had not mentioned that.

    Comment


    • #3
      It's a great way to decrease the likelihood of the cuttings rotting.
      Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

      Comment


      • #4
        I always put holes on the side of my 32 ounce clear containers when rooting

        Comment


        • #5
          I've been having issues getting rid of fungus gnats so I don't. I figure it would make it a lot easier for them.
          Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Zaffiro, Moro de Caneva, Nerucciolo d'Elba, Bordissot Blanca Negra, Rubado

          Comment


          • #6
            Well, this is for 100% Perlite. I have heard fungus gnats don't like 100% Perlite. I always hear how Perlite dries from the top. This would hopefully dry it more evenly. Plus the idea is to introduce more oxygen and hopefully force it up through the Perlite.I have already had the misfortune of rotting a couple cuttings in Perlite. Maybe no matter what I did they would rot. Not sure. Since plastic doesn't "breathe" like clay (or even the earth for that matter) it seems to be not a bad idea.

            Comment


            • #7
              I always do this when rooting cuttings in ProMix HP (peat/perlite blend). I also then keep them in a clear closed container to maintain humidity, which has the added bonuses of keeping out fungus gnats and reducing the need for watering.
              Sarah
              Bay Area, CA (zone: 9B)

              Comment


              • #8
                Blackfoot12,

                Drainage holes are usually placed in the bottom of rooting containers and "Aeration holes" are placed in the sides of the same containers. In the Rooting stage for cuttings there is a point of "diminishing returns" where too many holes will cause excessive dehydration of the newly formed roots and root initials on the cuttings. For the initial hydration and root formation or Pre-Rooting stage of the dormant cutting a high "ambient" moisture (the moisture at the cutting's surface,) is required, but when growing out the cutting this moisture has to be maintained at a high level for continuous growth with good air exchange to remove CO2, that's why Pre-Rooting, Rooting and Growing the cuttings have to be considered as different "stages".

                I don't currently use 100% Perlite as a rooting medium but have successfully used it with dilute water soluble fertilizers in the past. When using Perlite for rooting cuttings it should be sifted through a 1/8" sieve or a window screen to remove the Perlite dust. If the dust is not removed it will settle to the bottoms of the container, hold moisture around the dormant cutting and cause rot.

                I currently use Pre-Rooting in Coco Coir or Direct Rooting methods for starting dormant fig cuttings. A successful direct rooting method that has been documented on the forum is, http://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-ho...rooting-method and has separate, clear "steps" for the different stages of rooting. Good Luck.
                Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

                Comment


                • #9
                  Pete that is a great tutorial. Thank you. And, it answered a question I had already wondered about...namely how many holes in the side for aeration are optimal? I do intend to use dilute water soluble fertilizers once significant roots appear. Thank you again for the link.

                  Comment


                  • AscPete
                    AscPete commented
                    Editing a comment
                    You're welcome.
                    BTW, I've had good success with Miracle Grow and Hydroponic water soluble fertilizers @ 1 teaspoon per gallon of water for rooted cuttings.

                • #10
                  My experience has been that where there are no aeration holes in the side, my perlite turns green and the wrap around roots one wants in a clear cup never seem to materialize. Eventually the cutting medium just looks unhealthy. I usually up-pot at this point and manage to save my cuttings. More root growth would be preferable no doubt!
                  Rafael
                  Zone 10b, Miami, FL

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    I use tree pots and I bought and modified a 3 hole paper punch, like you would have had in school? I slide the tree pot in pull the handle and holes, turn, holes and done.
                    Cutting sales have ended for the season. Plant sales will start March 1 at 8 eastern time. If it is still too cold in your area I can hold your plants till a date of your choosing.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X