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  • JamesB
    commented on 's reply
    I really like your response in that you acknowledge climate as an important factor contributing to flavour. I guess I am lucky to to be living where I am 😁

  • Sod
    commented on 's reply
    I forgot about kadota. I have a 2nd year TC kadota I can’t decide if I want to keep or not.

  • Thorntorn
    replied
    My understanding is that the cookie, Fig Newton, is made from Kadota. I suspect dried Kadota figs are rehydrated and are the major ingredient, along other fruits (read the ingredient label), used in the cookie's filling.

    I suspect that because of your long, dry, hot ripening season that figs usually ripen there to perfection. I say this because how a perfectly (as close to perfect), ripe fig tastes here in the N. East USA where I garden, with a short ripening season, humid, wet, and cool, will be very different in taste for the same variety you grow there in Victoria. My flavor evaluations may be partially irrelevant to you, for this reason.

    Besides Kadota, which I like very much, I grow Yellow Long Neck and White Ischia, which are sweet, mild flavored figs as Kadota is. The White Ischia fruit is extremely sweet for me, the sweetest fig of ALL the varieties I grow, dark and light, and I believe I can safely predict it will be more so for you.

    Thorntorn

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  • nickawwad
    replied
    looks like i'll have Siblawi figs for the first time this year. Wills sent me the tree. Also will try Sarizeybek, Golden Riverside, Calimyrna and Golden Rainbow for the first time this year. Hoping desperately Rainbow is not the same as YLN. that would be a let down for me personally. So far, i would agree with Sweet joy as a definite keeper.

    Leave a comment:


  • JamesB
    replied
    Originally posted by Brian M View Post
    Oh Dolce Calderai beats them all by a mile. However, you need the wasp to get all that deliciousness.
    That looks absolutely magnificent! Is this not a common fig variety?

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  • Brian M
    replied
    Oh Dolce Calderai beats them all by a mile. However, you need the wasp to get all that deliciousness.
    Attached Files

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  • ginamcd
    commented on 's reply
    Oh yeah, I also have a Golden Rainbow that was gifted to me last July. Little to no growth until it went back outside about two weeks ago, but not holding out much hope for figs this year.

  • Halligan-
    commented on 's reply
    I have Peters Honey.
    It should fruit this summer

  • JamesB
    replied
    Has anyone tried pingo de mel (honey drop fig)?

    Leave a comment:


  • Sod
    replied
    I’ve still got a couple I’d like to get. Iranian candy, jack lily, sodus Sicilian, off the top of my head.

    I have golden rainbow, YLN, Lsu gold, and Oregon prolific. I’ve rooted sweet joy, and I’m working on Hollier and Scott’s yellow. I think that’s it for now of that type for me. There may be a couple more as the classification shuffles for how they taste...if I get anything from them this year. Not looking very likely quite yet.

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  • Sod
    commented on 's reply
    There is nothing wrong with peter’s honey. I almost picked one up this year at the store but decided to go for Stella instead.

  • spiff2
    replied
    It makes me sad that no one said Peters Honey since that is the one I have.

    Leave a comment:


  • ginamcd
    replied
    I gave up on Brookline White after multiple failed rooting attempts. I now have a second year San Miro Piro with several baby Brebas, and a newly rooted Iranian Candy (FKA Raasti Northern Persian Unknown) that keeps insisting on setting figs at ever leaf. Hopefully it won't be long before I know if I even like them. If I don't, I'm betting my husband will enjoy them.

    Leave a comment:


  • bbats
    commented on 's reply
    Is Janice seedless kadota different than regular kadota?

  • JamesB
    replied
    Curious to see if people’s favourite honey varieties have changed since last year. Also has anyone tried siblawi? What are your thoughts?

    Leave a comment:


  • JamesB
    commented on 's reply
    Where did Siblawi originate from? Sounds delicious!

  • crademan
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks for posting this description, WillsC. In addition to producing heavy crops of delicious fruits, do Siblawi figs have a closed eye?

  • Evdurtschi
    commented on 's reply
    That’s what I was hoping to hear. Thank you.

  • ramv
    commented on 's reply
    I’m going to give this one an early start

  • Brian M
    commented on 's reply
    There is depth to the flavor. It would be the opposite of LSU Purple which is like eating a spoonful of sugar.

  • Evdurtschi
    commented on 's reply
    😮 Thanks for sharing. I will have to try this one. What a fantastic recommendation.

  • m5allen
    replied
    I like Mary Lane Seedless.

    Leave a comment:


  • WillsC
    replied
    Have 400+ varieties and in my opinion far and away the winner is Siblawi. I call it the ant fig as every ant will ignore all of my other varieties to go for that tree. It is the ONLY tree I have to use tanglefoot on to keep the ants away and even them if one dang weed makes contact with a limb of that tree they find it. On a scale of 1/10 Siblawi is a 10 and have never found a fig that is even CLOSE to as sweet. Not only that it produces early, it is one of the first trees to ripen and ripens fruit all season long constantly. It is one of those that every single node produces a fig and with its fast robust growth that equates to VERY heavy yields. It does not seem bothered in the least by nematodes. It is my favorite tree I have. At the end of the season mid November ish the figs are less sweet and to me taste like honeydew melon.

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  • COONHUNTER56
    replied
    I only have a couple of honey figs. Last year Bananna was my favorite. I've read it's in the kadota family. I wasnt expecting it to actually taste like bananna. But under hot and dry conditions it certainly did. I've learned to allow the brown sugar spots to develop on all the light colored figs for maximum flavor.

    Leave a comment:


  • ginamcd
    replied
    As was said, not sure what's available to you, but here are the responses I received when I asked a similar question a while back -- https://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-h...ck-a-honey-fig

    I kept going back and re-reading the thread every time I thought I was ready to give a honey fig a spot, but still hadn't made up my mind to do so when I went after this year's cuttings.

    Then I received one bonus Brooklyn White cutting with a recent cutting purchase, so I am trying to root it. It was on the short list, though some don't consider it a true honey fig. If Brooklyn White doesn't root, I'm still torn on which honey (if any) I'll add this season.

    Good of luck with your search!

    Leave a comment:

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