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  • Fall figs vs breba figs

    Do late fall figs become next season brebas?

    Will brebas form in the node where last season main crop figs formed?

    Any thoughts on this subject?
    Jerry, Canyon Lake TX 8b

  • #2
    You'll probably get a couple varying answers on this, and I haven't yet found any scientific info regarding it, but here goes my (slightly) educated opinion. It is reportedly possible for late fall figs to ripen to following spring if kept from freezing, however these are not brebas (in my opinion). Brebas should be able to form on a node where the main crop was before, if it is a variety that produces brebas.
    https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
    SE PA
    Zone 6

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    • #3
      See, what Kelby said is what I thought was the order originally. But, now I'm not so sure, not that I'm saying Kelby is wrong..more so saying I'm confused. This year is seemed to me that I only got brebas at nodes that didn't make a main crop fig last year. I hope I am wrong, because that would be great if I could get more brebas on branches other than the terminal 2 or 3 nodes. I have one tree in mind, Petit Negra RT, it made fabulous brebas. Next season I plan to not thin them any and hope she holds all her breba, I'm okay with a smaller main crop on this one.
      Calvin, Wish list is to finish working on the new house, someday.
      Bored? Grab a rake, paint roller, or a cordless drill and come over!

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      • #4
        Jerry,

        Breba figs are embryonic figs that are usually not fully formed (bumps) in the fall usually at leaf nodes near the tips of branches and enlarge the following spring as "brebas". They may also be formed at the previous seasons leaf nodes that did not develop any figs.

        They are not usually formed at the same nodes as previously developed and harvested figs. There are very few exceptions like cultivars that sometimes develop multiple figs at the same leaf nodes but they are still the embryonic figs that did not develop.

        To increase breba harvest the "youngest" limbs with embryonic figs need to be protected from severe cold temperatures during the winter dormant period.
        Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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        • #5
          Looks like Pete has it right, here is some reading from 'The Fig' (http://naldc.nal.usda.gov/download/15714/PDF):

          "The morphology and anatomy of figs have been described by many authors. These reports have been summarized by Condit (1947, 1955)', Crane (1986), and Ruth (1975). The fig is an unusual tree as it may produce multiple crops of fruits each year, and certain fig types need pollen from their pollinator caprifigs. The breba crop, which is not produced in all cultivars, is borne laterally on the growth of the previous season from buds produced in leaf axils. These buds develop in the following spring, and the fruit matures between June and July. The main crop of figs is produced laterally in the axils of leaves on shoots of the current season. Fruit maturation starts at July and may last until temper-ature drops between October and December. At the end of the growth period, the leaves fall and the tree enters the dormancy period. Reproductive buds that do not produce fruit during the growing season remain dormant over the winter to give rise to the first spring breba crop. In some cultivars and in appropriate environments, largely developed main crop figs may remain on the tree over the winter and complete development in early spring."

          What completely puzzles me is how a San Pedro fig the same bud can require pollination for the main crop and not require it for the breba crop.


          https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
          SE PA
          Zone 6

          Comment


          • #6
            Kelby,
            Thanks for sharing the link and quote...
            IMO, the chemical and physical changes in the dormant fig embryos can explain why San Pedro Type brebas ripen, even Common Type breba figs are often physically different from their main crop figs.


            Attached are a few photos of "future Breba", if the limbs and embryos survive through winter storage they will be the breba crop of 2016.
            You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 5 photos.
            Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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            • #7
              Another applicable quote I found: "During winter dormancy, most fig syconia at Stage II will drop, while fig syconia at Stage I will form scales that protect the developing fruit from low winter temperature. In this case, the fruits stay quiescent and produce breba crop in spring. Generally, autumn production will reduce the number of dormant buds and, therefore, next year's breba crop production."
              https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
              SE PA
              Zone 6

              Comment


              • #8
                Good stuff guys. I had to google syconis - A syconium is the type of inflorescence borne by figs (genus Ficus), formed by an enlarged, fleshy, hollow receptacle with multiple ovaries on the inside surface. In essence, it is really a fleshy stem with a number of flowers, so it is considered both a multiple and accessory fruit.
                Jerry, Canyon Lake TX 8b

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                • #9
                  and another applicable Quote,
                  Breba figs have a different pattern of growth and development from the main crop syconia that develop on the same branch in the same season.Shortly after initiation, the breba syconium enters winter dormancy. At spring, the breba syconium resumes growth, which continues for 7 to 8 weeks with a short quiescence stage for 2 weeks and a fast maturation stage, for 2 weeks, in June-July. About 2 weeks before maturation of the breba fruit, growth rate and sugar accumulation significantly increase. Since all breba fig syconia on the same branch are at similar develop-mental stages, the fruit harvest is shorter and lasts only 2 to 3 weeks.
                  There's a wealth of info including many referenced documents and pertinent info including the explanation of the mentioned stages of main crop fig growth which has been discussed as the 30 - 60 - 90 day fig ripening rule;

                  Breba Figs:
                  Stage I ... Spring growth to quiescence (stagnant stage or stage II), 7 - 8 weeks
                  Stage II ... Quiescence stage 2 weeks.
                  Stage III ... Ripening 2 weeks.

                  Main Crop Figs:
                  Stage I ... Rapid growth to quiescence (stagnant stage or stage II), 5 - 6 weeks
                  Stage II ... Quiescence stage 3 - 8 weeks (depending on the fig variety)
                  Stage III ... Ripening 3 - 5 weeks.
                  Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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