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  • Ways to increase fruit size /flavor?

    What are some ways to increase fig fruit size and/or flavor?

    I've read with figs that you can reduce watering during the ripening stages to increase flavor.

    Age of the tree is also supposed to be a determining factor.

    Anyone thin figs off of their tree to increase size?

    Anyone ever tried adding salt to the soil like you could with a tomato plant to increase flavor?

    Other methods?
    Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Zaffiro, Moro de Caneva, Nerucciolo d'Elba, Bordissot Blanca Negra, Rubado

  • #2
    Don,

    Usually a decrease in fruit size results in an increase in flavor. As an example my O'Rourke figs growing in a 10 gallon SIP were averaging ~ 42 grams, by allowing the reservoir to go empty and top watering the container I was able to reduce the the average weight to ~ 25 grams while concentrate the flavors.

    Yes, the anecdotal info and my experience is that as the fig trees get older the figs will not only ripen sooner but will also increased in flavor. IMO, thinning figs will allow the figs to ripen sooner by redirecting the plants resources and may also allow the figs to attain their "maximum" average size, but a size increase has not been my experience.

    I've never tried adding salt to soils for any plants, but have tried to increase the health of the fig trees and the developing figs by increasing available Micro Nutrients, Calcium, Magnesium and readily available Macro Nutrients due to the observed nutritional content of ripe figs which are high in Potassium, Calcium, Magnesium and Iron, http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/sh...ew=&measureby= , http://www.californiafigs.com/page.php?page=12
    Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

    Comment


    • AscPete
      AscPete commented
      Editing a comment
      Don,
      For proper fertilization of a 5 gallon container (bucket) 2 cups of Garden-tone are required for new potting mix with 1 cup added per month... I've used an initial reduced amount of Garden-tone in addition to the dilute water soluble fertilizer fertigation.

      You can follow the Earthbox (Original Commercial SIP) replant instructions, http://earthbox.com/earthbox-pdf/rep...ructions-1.pdf , the organic fertilizer can be placed in a circular trough on the perimeter of the bucket.

    • don_sanders
      don_sanders commented
      Editing a comment
      Really? That seems like a lot. They seemed to grow pretty well this year. I can't imagine how big they'll get if I was under fertilizing. I guess I'll have to step it up next year. I suppose the floralicious helped but it has a low potash content. 40% of my potting mix was compost too.

      Do you think it could have contributed to the smaller fruit sizes?

      Honestly, the smaller ones did taste better than the big one though. Not sure if it was because of tree age, light, or just the size of the fruit. The large one started developing inside under lights for half of the time. The others were 4 months later outside.

    • AscPete
      AscPete commented
      Editing a comment
      The manufacturer (Espoma) recommends 2 cups per 1 cubic foot of mix (5 gallon bucket holds ~ .7 cu ft) with 1 cup added per month... and figs trees are actually heavy feeders when actively growing.

      Yes, young trees less than ~ 3 years old will usually produce smaller and later ripening figs.

  • #3
    I can't say it's true in every case but I have noticed something. My Black Triana that is growing in ground produces larger figs than the potted tree. The breba of the in ground tree are large. I've had them close to peach size and very sweet while the breba from the potted tree are big but nowhere near the size of the in ground tree. The in ground figs are sticky sweet compared to just sweet from the potted tree. I would think that a tree growing in ground would produce a fig with better flavor, quality and size because more root room, minerals and the fact that the moisture is more of a constant unlike a potted tree that gets flooded then dries out while the sun heats the roots to a high temperature on a daily basis. That's my uneducated 2.7 cents on it. At least it sounds fairly good too.
    Wishlist; Green Michurinska, St. Rita
    Tony
    Sarver, PA Zone 6A.

    Comment


    • Rewton
      Rewton commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks for your comment Tony. I've wondered about that too but never did the comparison that you did. Of course the downside of growing in-ground is later onset of fruit development and the greater chance of cold damage. Let's hope this winter will be "average" one for a change.

    • AscPete
      AscPete commented
      Editing a comment
      Yes, its almost a given that in-ground fig trees will produce better quality figs...

    • don_sanders
      don_sanders commented
      Editing a comment
      My figs in sips have been pretty small. The largest was 40g. The smallest was 6g. Average probably around 15g.

      I will be sinking some into the ground with holes in the side. Hopefully, that will produce the same effect as directly planted in ground.
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