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  • If you could pick one cold hardy fig from each flavor category...

    Sort of a sister thread to my earlier thread regarding fig name vs flavor category....

    At some point (probably in the next two years) I will decide which container trees I will put in ground. In my situation, I have limited space so I'd like to have a collection of in ground fig trees that represents the different fig flavor categories. The only catch is I'm in zone 6b so I'll need it to be cold hardy.

    Here's my list. Which is always up for amendment BTW.

    Adriatic Berry - JH Adriatic
    Bordeaux Berry - Ronde de Bordeaux
    Dark Berry - Marseilles Black VS
    Honey - Nordland
    Sugar - Florea

    I'd love to hear other's thoughts for hardy figs from each flavor category.

    For reference sake, here's a good thread discussion cold hardy figs from the F4F forum.
    Malcolm - Carroll County, MD (zone 6b). Interested in cold hardy figs. Currently container growing, MBVS, St. Rita, Olympian, RdB, Beale, Sal's EL, UCD 184-15s and Desert King.

  • #2
    The JH should follow Adriatic not proceed it same as the VS on Marseilles Black.

    Don't know why, that just tweeks my CDO!

    Nice list. Run some searches, Pete has put of ton of info on here that will help you.
    Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

    “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

    Comment


    • #3
      Malcolm,

      IMO, there are no "Cold Hardy" fig cultivars just "Hardier" cultivars since Ficus carica are native to dry temperate zones 9 - 10. Kelby has compiled and posted lists of some hardy cultivars, http://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-ho...hardy-fig-list and more info can be found in the pinned topic, http://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-ho...erenced-topics

      I would select readily available cultivars aka Gateway Cultivars, http://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-ho...-fig-cultivars to complete the flavor groups, http://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-ho...-flavor-groups and the earlier ripening cultivars of each flavor group (A and B) are also the hardier and earlier producing in shorter grown seasons (colder zones).

      My Current list would be;
      Adriatic Berry - Verte (Green ischia)
      Bordeaux Berry - Ronde de Bordeaux
      Dark Berry - Sal's
      Honey - Champagne
      Sugar - LSU Improved Celeste

      Good Luck.
      Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

      Comment


      • Erick
        Erick commented
        Editing a comment
        Which Sals would you put in the Dark berry type Pete?

      • AscPete
        AscPete commented
        Editing a comment
        Erick,
        All Sal's except Sal's Corleone which is in the Sugar Flavor Group, but I was referring to Sals GH (Gene).

    • #4
      Haven't had Nordland personally, but I think that's more a sugar flavor. Honey is generally green/yellow with an amber center.

      There are shortcomings to the flavor families, for example both English Brown Turkey types and Improved Celeste are considered sugar but they are quite different and both are keepers for me. Overall it's a good way to keep track of acquisitions!
      https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
      SE PA
      Zone 6

      Comment


      • #5
        Another way to look at this would be what are the cultivars within those flavor classifications that have the shortest ripening time? A crucial feature in short seasons, especially with limb die-back. Might be the following:

        Sugar - Florea and LSU Improved Celeste
        Honey - Lattarulla
        Dark Berry - Mt Etna
        Bordeaux Berry - Ronde de Bordeaux
        Adriatic Berry - JH Adriatic

        All but JH Adriatic have short ripening times. Maybe someone could suggest an Adriatic that produces earlier.

        Gallo and Bianchetta are a couple other cultivars that might do well but I do not have them to observe. (Light skin, red interior, I believe)

        All that said, not listed above, Brooklyn White would be one of the first cultivars that I would put in ground after Mt Etna, because so robust and productive, also highly flavorful, though later than all the above except JH Adriatic. Brooklyn White has a light strawberry taste to me, or glazed strawberry, or strawberry-citric depending on degree of ripeness, but some people classify BW as honey flavor, maybe because of its sweet glow aftertaste, or because it is light strawberry in color and flavor rather than a dark or deep strawberry like the Adriatics. It approaches Adriatic in flavor but lacks the characteristic extra bit of intensity inherent in the Adriatics. It can also be considered the light flip of the dark Mt Etnas, though bigger and usually with a thicker more lingering aftertaste, and with less grape in its flavor. I find the Mt Etnas to often have a strawberry-grape punch flavor, sometimes drop-dead sweet, other times when less ripe tart edged. Brooklyn White spans a similar impressive gamut.

        I'm increasingly interested in trying the Late Bordeauxs in the ground (Violette, Vista, Negronne, Petite Negri, Nero 600m, etc) because at least in pot the main crop has begun to ripen not as late as I thought it might.
        Tony WV 6b
        https://mountainfigs.net/

        Comment


        • #6
          I hadn't thought of ripening times so that's good information to know when deciding upon fig variety. That being said, do ripening times change as the fig becomes more mature? Just thinking, the bigger the fig tree, the more energy it can absorb, the faster ripening/better tasting the figs become.

          That being said, there's also the mentality choosing varieties that will extend your fig season so that you have early, mid and late ripening figs. This may cause you to have some unripened figs at the end of the year during some seasons, but in others it allows you to have figs from July until October so maybe it "evens out" in the long run?
          Malcolm - Carroll County, MD (zone 6b). Interested in cold hardy figs. Currently container growing, MBVS, St. Rita, Olympian, RdB, Beale, Sal's EL, UCD 184-15s and Desert King.

          Comment


          • mountainfigs
            mountainfigs commented
            Editing a comment
            Earliest main crop cultivars by flavor category from my ripening report this year; first ripened on the following dates in August:

            3rd: Sugar - LSU Improved Celeste
            3rd: Honey - Lattarulla
            4th: Molasses Berry - Ronde de Bordeaux
            18th: Dark Berry - Mt Etna (Zingarella)
            21st: Intense Molasses Berry - Late Bordeaux (Petite Negri, Negronne)
            25th: Light Berry - Brooklyn White
            25th: Intense Light Berry ('Adriatic') - Calverte

            Small quality breba crops ripened in July:

            10th: dark - Vista
            23rd: light - Brooklyn White

          • smithmal
            smithmal commented
            Editing a comment
            Tony, these ripening time are fig trees that are in ground. Is that correct?

        • #7
          For a fruit that cannot be bought fresh ripe in store in zone 6, figs are easy to grow. That said, they can also be more or less difficult to ripen by cultivar, by age, by degree of dieback, by amount of limb growth, by presence or absence of a breba crop, by size of crop(s), by nutrition and moisture levels, by amount of sunlight, and so on. Given the very many factors that impact fruit production, zone 6 growers greatly improve their odds of ripening bountiful flavorful fruit by choosing cultivars that reliably produce either a large breba crop or an early main crop.

          Very many factors can delay a crop so that even the earliest ripening cultivars never ripen some years in zone 6 - though mainly I suppose with some in ground trees that suffer total winter top kill.

          Also, a number of the early and middle ripening varieties ripen fruit till frost, whether in waves or more-or-less continuously. Point being: most early figs are late figs too. They are self "staggering" or nearly everbearing. Sometimes early figs in zone 6 are only late figs. Rarely if ever does the opposite occur, though as trees age some cultivars that only ripen late when young can ripen somewhat earlier.

          My most reliably flavorful earliest and latest cultivars here in zone 6 are the same: the Late Bordeauxs and Brooklyn White (earliest due to their quality breba crops), followed by Ronde de Bordeaux, LSU Improved Celeste, and the Mt Etnas (unprotected, after total top kill, the Mt Etnas are far and away the champs.) These latter 3 have bountiful early main crops that ripen in waves more or less continuously not only to but somewhat through frost. The Late Bordeauxs and Brooklyn White have somewhat later (but not late) main crops that also ripen through frost.

          These cultivars have been working for me so far, including from young ages. Other cultivars work for other people, and I look forward to the possibility of additional cultivars working as well here too sooner or later.

          Improved Celeste, Brooklyn White, Ronde de Bordeaux, the Late Bordeauxs, and the Mt Etnas ... these five are my zone 6 stars so far.
          Last edited by mountainfigs; 10-31-2015, 04:21 PM. Reason: added "but not late"
          Tony WV 6b
          https://mountainfigs.net/

          Comment


          • #8
            Tony,

            Excellent info. I see your point regarding "hedging your bets" to ensure that you receive figs each year by picking varieities that are known for their earlier ripening times. Moreover, I got a lot of my ripening data from mgginva who only container grows. B/c he never puts his figs in ground he never has to worry about die back and he's figs tend to take off much faster than in ground figs as his pot soil heats up faster than ground soil.

            That being said, can you think of a variety you would pick in the Adriatic berry catagory? I believe that both Alma and Osborne Prolific are known as earlier ripeninig varieties so they may fit the bill.
            Malcolm - Carroll County, MD (zone 6b). Interested in cold hardy figs. Currently container growing, MBVS, St. Rita, Olympian, RdB, Beale, Sal's EL, UCD 184-15s and Desert King.

            Comment


            • #9
              Malcolm,

              Individual trees may ripen their figs earlier as they age over several years but it would be measured in weeks not months. The 30-60-90 day ripening rule and daily average temperatures, http://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-ho...-ripening-figs will still apply.

              Zone 6 has a minimum average temperature of -23C or -10F which would kill any exposed fig tree branches, so there would not be any "bigger" in ground trees or breba figs unless they were well protected during the winter months. Potted trees can be moved into storage and may produce breba figs if they are also well protected and kept above -1C or 30F, the usual posted temperatures is -4C or 25F. To produce Breba, early, middle and late season figs the cultivars have to be chosen using the expected ambient temperatures and planned cultural practice as criteria.

              BTW, neither Alma nor Osborne Prolific are in the Adriatic Flavor Group, Alma is in the Honey Flavor Group and it depends on which Osbourne Prolific cultivar (several different with the same name), but they usually fall into the Sugar Flavor Group.
              Last edited by AscPete; 10-30-2015, 09:49 PM. Reason: typo...
              Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

              Comment


              • susieqz
                susieqz commented
                Editing a comment
                pete, my inground mount etanas set fruit weeks earlier every year for the first few years, but in year 4, i'm seeing fruit set a full month earlier than year 3.
                if not due to a mild winter, i no longer need worry about losing fruit to frost.
                looks like ripening can be sped up by months.

            • #10
              Malcolm,

              I would echo what Pete wrote, with one qualified exception, where he notes:

              "To produce Breba, early, middle and late season figs the cultivars have to be chosen using the expected ambient temperatures and planned cultural practice as criteria."

              He's talking about under ideal conditions. I don't have ideal conditions in my yard; most people don't. For example, I place potted trees and have in ground trees of the same cultivar in spots that vary greatly in the amount of sun and water and nutrients they receive; thus, for instance, the places with the most sun produce ripe figs earlier than all the other spots that themselves produce figs at different times all the way through frost. In that way, one can have a single cultivar produce from its earliest ripening point through frost ... by locating it and/or treating it differently.

              I don't know (yet perhaps) of an early ripening "Adriatic" flavored fig, intense strawberry. I can consider Brooklyn White to be a "poor man's" Adriatic. It's a lighter strawberry taste but can ripen with a very thick sweet glaze aftertaste, not a thin flavor like too many of the sugar figs. Brooklyn White has too much strawberry flavor and color to be considered a honey fig, in my opinion and to my taste, though others consider it to be in the honey category. Though Brooklyn White does not have the intensity of the Adriatics, I sometimes consider it to be a less intense cousin, however distant. That said, I consider Brooklyn White to be a light larger cousin of the "Dark Berry" figs too.

              The 5 flavor categories rubric is very arbitrary in some ways, in my opinion. For example, LSU Purple figs have a maple sugar flavor to me that is deeper and more flavorful than most other sugar figs I've tasted. The variation within the Adriatics and other types, honey figs in particular, can be very wide too. Also, there is another category in my opinion among dark figs: premier dark, or dark intense berry. To me it makes just as much sense to say there are 2 basic categories of figs: berry and sugar (or berry and honey) (or berry and agave) as it does to say there are 5 basic categories or 7 basic categories, and so on.

              Long story short, no need to have an "Adriatic" (intense strawberry) flavor to have a very wide spectrum of fig flavors. On the other hand, it is one hell of a flavor. It is very distinct and powerful, as are many fig flavors, far more than 5. Nevertheless, a spectrum of even 3 fig flavors seems incredible to me.
              Tony WV 6b
              https://mountainfigs.net/

              Comment


              • AscPete
                AscPete commented
                Editing a comment
                I was generalizing, not referring to 'ideal conditions'.
                The ripening rules, http://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-ho...-ripening-figs can and do apply in any location or zone and your examples point to the efficacy of the rules when applied to real life conditions.

              • mountainfigs
                mountainfigs commented
                Editing a comment
                Zone 6 is no zone to be generalizing! Not when growing figs. You can take those rules and throw them out the window!

                Just kidding. Point being though to new growers: be prepared to baby, to fine tune, to pamper, to keenly observe, to be exceedingly patient in zone 6 when growing all but the most precocious fig cultivars. (At least and especially with young trees.) You have to do a lot right, it seems to me. And of course short season figs require care too, while allowing more room for error.

                On the other hand, if your thumb is truly and naturally green - which I suspect mine is not - then you might find it no sweat to gain bountiful crops on most any cultivar many years. I marvel at growers who can do that.

                The other thing to consider is that trees grow more powerful with age, and that while a lot can be expected of some cultivars at a young age, other cultivars require more years, more wood, more root. So I have some late ripeners in the background, just growing, growing, hoping that with age comes productivity.

            • #11
              Originally posted by COGardener View Post
              The JH should follow Adriatic not proceed it same as the VS on Marseilles Black.

              Don't know why, that just tweeks my CDO!
              I have a different view on the JHA/AJH etymological issue.

              Like you, I write the person's initials afterward for MBVS since that variety is indeed a Marseilles Black, and the VS signifies which strain of Marseilles Black. I also do this for all other varieties in which the variety is true and the initials signify a particular lineage/strain.

              JHA is different, imo, because what Joe Hood thought was an Adriatic turned out not to be an Adriatic, and therefore it seems misleading to me to add the initials afterward as if to signify an actual and particular strain of Adriatic. So to me, "Adriatic JH" is both false and misleading, and "JH Adriatic" seems more proper. A secondary consideration is that I think the most accurate name would be "JH's purported Adriatic," and JHA is the natural abbreviation of that, given that it is agreed that it is not an Adriatic fig. I also prefer to leave the name as initials, to further minimize the word 'Adriatic'.

              Not trying to step on any toes, that's just my view on the best way to clearly name that variety. We're in agreement on where to add a person's initials in general, but imo JHA is a special case and should be an exception.

              EDITED TO ADD: This is with me using 'Adriatic' in a familial sense to signify close genetic relation, a la 'Mt. Etna'. In that sense, I had read much about JHA not being an Adriatic fig despite its coloration (like how Black Madeira is not a Mt. Etna fig despite having dark skin). But it seems that some folks may be using the word 'Adriatic' in a much looser sense, more akin to just saying it has a red interior (which to me would be like saying that Black Madeira is a Mt. Etna fig since they both have dark skin). So if 'Adriatic' simply means that it has a red interior, then I could see how "Adriatic-JH" could be considered proper, but if 'Adriatic' means a family of closely genetically related varieties that JHA doesn't actually belong to, then I think JHA is proper. My understanding was that 'Adriatic' was a familial designation, not just a catch-all for figs with red interiors, so that's why I always write it as JHA.
              Last edited by GreenFin; 10-31-2015, 01:48 AM.

              Comment


              • smithmal
                smithmal commented
                Editing a comment
                So I'm confused. If Adriatic JH is not an Adriatic flavored fig, what is it classified as? My understanding is that it produces a green fig with a red berry flavored interior and has a similar flavor as UCD Adriatic. Is that not what an 'Adriatic Berry' fig is supposed to have?
                Last edited by smithmal; 11-03-2015, 09:12 AM.

              • GreenFin
                GreenFin commented
                Editing a comment
                There are 2 different ways of using the word 'Adriatic'. One way, which is the way you are using, is to simply use it as a catch-all for green figs with red berry flavored interiors. But another different definition/way to use 'Adriatic' is in the familial sense, where we're talking about genetics and whether the varieties are even closely related or not. Just because a fig is green and has a red interior does NOT mean that it is closely related to all other green skinned/red interior figs.

                Here's an analogy to help make this clear. Since Black Madeira and Hardy Chicago both have dark skin and red interiors, does that mean they're closely genetically related? Nope. And they're not. So we wouldn't call Black Madeira a Mt. Etna fig even though they both have dark skin and red interiors, since they're not genetically closely related. Mt. Etna is a geographical region where some closely related figs came from (similar to how a number of closely related green skinned red interior figs came from the Adriatic region). In this context, 'Mt. Etnas' refers to figs that are closely genetically related, not just dark skinned with red interiors. In that same way, 'Adriatic' can be used to refer to a closely genetically related family of figs rather than just as a catch-all for all green figs with red interiors. And that distinction is very important, because JH Adriatic is thought to NOT be closely genetically related to those other green figs with red interiors, and is instead thought to be none other than White Madeira.

                So the same way that not all dark skinned figs with red interiors are 'Mt. Etna' figs, not all green skinned figs with red interiors are 'Adriatic' figs. JH Adriatic isn't an adriatic fig in the same sense that Black Madeira isn't a Mt. Etna fig.

                And since JH Adriatic isn't really an Adriatic fig in the familial sense (since it isn't closely genetically related to them), and since the 'Adriatic' in the name 'JH Adriatic' is just a relic from when JH mistakenly thought that his tree was an Adriatic fig in the familial sense, I personally choose to always put the JH first when writing and speaking the name.

            • #12
              These are good distinctions, James. There has been speculation - or considered evaluation - that JH Adriatic is White Madeira. Could well be. I haven't ripened enough JH Adriatic or Black Madeira to draw any firm conclusions. But by what I've seen of what I have ripened, and by what I've seen of what others have shown, and by comparing the leaves on my trees (JH Adriatic and Black Madeira), it wouldn't be surprising to conclude that JH Adriatic is White Madeira, aka Figo Branco to Figo Preto.
              Tony WV 6b
              https://mountainfigs.net/

              Comment


              • #13
                Speaking of good distinctions, thanks for the great article on Improved Celeste and O'Rourke: http://mountainfigs.net/new-to-figs/...nct-cultivars/ Thanks to your guidelines, I learned that my purported Celeste is actually an Improved Celeste and that my O'Rourke is thankfully true.

                I think that mentioning your article is relevant to this thread since Improved Celeste would be my recommendation for a cold hardy sugar fig. I haven't had Florea yet, but Improved Celeste is a beast for me here in zone 6a. I started picking ripe figs off of my 2yr old outdoor in-ground IC on Sept 2nd, a couple of weeks before my 2yr old outdoor in-ground Mt. Etnas, despite the fact that it died down to the ground last winter. I have another IC growing in-ground in one of my tunnels, and it's my most productive tree in that environment, too. Only thing that beats it in terms of productivity is a Hardy Chicago growing in an aquaponics growbed inside another tunnel, but that's an unfair comparison due to the constant fertigation the HC gets from the fish poop water.

                Comment


                • #14
                  I agree: Improved Celeste is a beast. An early beast too. In the shortest seasons and most northern regions (zone 4?) I think at least one grower has said that only Improved Celeste will ripen. Very sweet, especially for the north, and decent size, nice shape, good color. Flavor to me can seem a little thin sometimes with an almost too-sweet or cutting aftertaste, though others value that more than the fuller and somewhat less sweet flavor of the Mt Etnas. I've had much more success with Improved Celeste too than with Florea though my Improved Celeste trees are considerably older.

                  If a person had in pot only an Improved Celeste, or a Mt Etna type, or a Brooklyn White, or a Ronde de Bordeaux, or ironically a Late Bordeaux, they could be sure of having one great fig for short season zones - zone 6 at least and probably zone 5. Improved Celeste can ripen the earliest each year (though RDB or a few others may barely best it some years) and will try to ripen a second main crop, like RDB.

                  Florea, and Lattarulla, and Pastiliere (aka Rouge de Bordeaux) are other very early main crop ripeners that can rival IC and RDB for very earliest. I have three small trees of these in which I need to see improvements in both productivity and ability to ripen fruit to frost.

                  Always on the lookout for other early ripeners.
                  Tony WV 6b
                  https://mountainfigs.net/

                  Comment


                  • #15
                    Tony,

                    Have you ever grown or tasted Nordland/Longue d'Aout? I believe both are thought of a hardy figs and both have a similar flavor profile (sugar). From what I've read Nordland is preferred over LdA as its figs are a larger size. LdA though ripens earlier.

                    LdA = mid August (container grown)
                    Nordland = mid September (container grown)
                    Malcolm - Carroll County, MD (zone 6b). Interested in cold hardy figs. Currently container growing, MBVS, St. Rita, Olympian, RdB, Beale, Sal's EL, UCD 184-15s and Desert King.

                    Comment


                    • #16
                      Have an LdA rooted cutting with a couple unripe figs on it currently. I should have picked them off. Not my favorite flavor profile but I'll look forward to it especially if it proves to be a very early ripener.
                      Tony WV 6b
                      https://mountainfigs.net/

                      Comment


                      • #17
                        While we're on it, my previous recollection as to what "age" a container fig should be mature enough to grow in ground is when the trunk caliper is 3" or more? Do I have that right?
                        Malcolm - Carroll County, MD (zone 6b). Interested in cold hardy figs. Currently container growing, MBVS, St. Rita, Olympian, RdB, Beale, Sal's EL, UCD 184-15s and Desert King.

                        Comment


                        • GreenFin
                          GreenFin commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Last year I put 1st year figs in the ground that were rooted only a few months prior, but like fitzski noted, I took cuttings as backups. To winterize, I bent them over and made 1-2' tall dirt mounds over them. Didn't work as well as I'd hoped, as 14 out of 15 varieties died down to the normal ground level, anyway, with Hardy Chicago being the only exception. They all came back up, though. Got a decent amount of good fruit from Hardy Chicago, MBVS, and Improved Celeste, and a couple from Dottato and Salce.

                        • smithmal
                          smithmal commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Kevin,

                          Do you believe your die back was due to the youth of the tree that you put into the ground, the procedure which you used to insulate the tree, or a combination of both?

                        • fitzski
                          fitzski commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I think my failure was due to inadequate insulation. Last year I followed what my sister in law's father used to do more closely and it seems to have worked. I'll post this method when I do it this year.

                          But my in-ground fig woke up 4-6 weeks after my figs in the GH for winter storage. Of course, the ones into the GH were getting temps in the 60-70's in late March - early April.

                          I think moving forward I'm going to have some in-ground and some in pots. That way i can extend my season even more.

                          But you're almost a zone different than me so things should be better for you with in-ground trees.

                          In Eastern MA last year we had almost 100 inches of snows from the middle of January to the end of February. It kept coming in feet not inches.

                          I don't mind the snow but usually it comes during the whole winter with some melting. Last year was crazy and we kept getting feet every 5-7 days for 6 weeks.

                          Hopefully this winter is a little less brutal

                      • #18
                        So it looks like Adriatic, while probably hardy enough for my zone, may or may not consistently provide me with ripened figs since it ripens so late in the season. If that's the case, I have a couple questions for Adriatics.

                        1. Is it a good assumption that if I container grow an Adriatic I'd have a better chance of getting ripened figs each year (since container figs "wake up" faster than in ground figs)
                        2. According to this post it would seem there are two "hardy" Adriatics: Adriatic JH and Stella/Dalmatie. I will probably put a Adriatic JH in ground regardless b/c it is so well thought of, but if you were to select your favorite tasting Adriatic what would it be?

                        I'm familiar with the followings:
                        • Green Ischia (Verte)
                        • Strawberry Verte
                        • Emerald Strawberry
                        • White Adriatic
                        • Stella/Dalmatie
                        Malcolm - Carroll County, MD (zone 6b). Interested in cold hardy figs. Currently container growing, MBVS, St. Rita, Olympian, RdB, Beale, Sal's EL, UCD 184-15s and Desert King.

                        Comment


                        • AscPete
                          AscPete commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Adriatic is an actual variety / cultivar, Adriatic Flavor is a descriptor for a Green exterior Berry flavored figs.

                          Adriatic JH and Stella/Dalmatie are distinct and different cultivars. The true Adriatic fig is a late season cultivar that is relatively popular on the west coast.

                        • jkuo
                          jkuo commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I might try both Adriatic JH and Stella in ground. I got to sample both this season, and they were both really tasty. If my arm were being twisted, I'd pick Adriatic JH over Stella based on my limited tasting experience. But since my arm is not being twisted, I plan on keeping both in my collection.

                        • smithmal
                          smithmal commented
                          Editing a comment
                          kjuo; thanks for the comment. I think then I'll stick with Adriatic JH as my 'Adriatic Flavored' in ground fig variety.

                      • #19
                        Scott, I understand completely. My wife has CDO also
                        Last edited by Atlatl; 11-13-2016, 02:32 PM.
                        FAQ: https://tinyurl.com/ydy46as5
                        Zone 7a Wish List: Sodus Sicilian, Nordland, Sal's EL, Gino's and Any Zone 5/6 Fig

                        Comment


                        • #20
                          This year, the better producers here by category of flavor:

                          1st Picks
                          resin berry ("Bordeaux"): Ronde de Bordeaux
                          berry punch (dark berry): Mt Etna
                          citric berry ("Adriatic): Nordland (Longue d'Aout...)
                          honey-berry: Brooklyn White
                          honey: pick 'em -- (Kadota, Long Yellow, Marseilles, Mary Lane, Lemon, Excel, LSU Gold, Peter's Honey, Lattarula ... all about equal, though in different ways)
                          caramel: LSU Purple
                          sugar: Improved Celeste
                          sugar-berry: LSU Tiger

                          2nd Picks
                          resin berry ("Bordeaux"): Violette de Bordeaux
                          berry punch (dark berry): Violet Sepor
                          citric berry ("Adriatic): Paradiso GM-9 (Battaglia Green)
                          honey-berry: Conadria
                          honey: pick 'em
                          caramel: Wuhan
                          sugar: O'Rourke
                          sugar-berry: Florea
                          • I think all the first picks above are worth trialing in ground in cool growing zones, though probably not all the second picks.
                          • Top five overall: Mt Etna, Ronde de Bordeaux, LSU Tiger, Brooklyn White, LSU Improved Celeste.
                          • Curious that with all the yellow skin, golden pulp honey figs in play, none separated from the pack. On average though, it seems possibly the most reliable flavor, skin & pulp color category. Not sure worth trialing any in ground though, as none seem very early ripening.
                          Last edited by mountainfigs; 11-14-2016, 01:04 PM. Reason: added Lattarula
                          Tony WV 6b
                          https://mountainfigs.net/

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                          • mountainfigs
                            mountainfigs commented
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                            3 gallons to 15 gallons, with root escape for all. This fall I'm doing major downsizing of pots. Some 7 gallons but most will be 5 gallons or less - with root escape. Will see how it goes. This is in addition to a bunch of in-ground Mt Etnas and a few others.

                          • JMS
                            JMS commented
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                            Tony, what do you mean by root escape? Is that another word for heeling them in with holes in the sides?

                          • mountainfigs
                            mountainfigs commented
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                            Yes. This past year I had no potted figs with roots entirely internal to pots. Heel them in and they quickly put roots into ground. Makes them a lot less dependent on me, in many ways.

                        • #21
                          I’ve heard that Violette de Solliès is a great cold hardy berry fig. Anyone here have experience with it? I have one coming and will be looking to grow in ground in zone 6b....

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