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  • OT sunchokes

    So I have grown a clump of sunchokes (Jerusalem Artichokes), and now the frost has killed the leaves, so I have these 8-9 foot green stems there. Anyone know what I should do with them now?
    Hi my name is Art. I buy fig cuttings-so I can grow more figs-so I can sell more figs-so I can buy more fig cuttings-so I can grow more figs....

  • #2
    I've been growing them for a few years and I always let the ztem go brown before cutting them close to the ground. And then a few weeks after that I would start harvesting. Kind of the same schedule I use for potatoes. If you mulch heavily like with hay bales, you can harvest them all winter.

    Hope this helps.
    Kevin (Eastern MA - Zone 5b/6a)

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    • #3
      I'd scrub 'em and throw 'em in the oven!

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      • #4
        That's funny, I've always eaten them raw. I'm researching growing chokes myself, so no advice here! Good luck.

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        • #5
          Yup, just dig them as you need them. They keep in the cold ground. I dug up my first batch, leaving the 2nd batch for later in the month. I like them roasted, and in spinach dip... like artichoke hearts. I like them raw, but they're just so interesting tasting cooked! BTW, make sure you're thorough digging them up. Any that you leave in the ground will re-start your patch next year... which isn't necessarily a bad thing!
          Zone 7a in Virginia

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          • cjmach1973
            cjmach1973 commented
            Editing a comment
            thanks, do you have to peel them?

          • SarinaP
            SarinaP commented
            Editing a comment
            For me, it depends on how I'm using them. If you're making a delicate puree with a little cream to be used as a sauce, I would. If you're roasting them or don't mind the earthier flavor, leave the skin on. It's like leaving the skin on a potato.

        • #6
          No. Peeling is not necessary. Scrub them the best you can then peel the parts that are hard to clean.
          Wishlist; Green Michurinska, St. Rita
          Tony
          Sarver, PA Zone 6A.

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          • #7
            Sounds really good. I will need to grow these in the future.
            NC Zone 7a-b

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            • SarinaP
              SarinaP commented
              Editing a comment
              They're ridiculously easy! I get them fresh from the Asian store, plop them in a container with some dirt, and just let them go. You get more if you plant them in-ground, but I'm lazy and they come back if you don't get every single one harvested.

          • #8
            Never tasted one before so I googled them. Got one curious link:
            http://www.bonappetit.com/columns/th...cause-diarrhea
            USDA z 10a, SoCal. WL: Raspberry Tart, Boysenberry Blush

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            • SarinaP
              SarinaP commented
              Editing a comment
              They don't affect me--but then again, not much that I eat does. I have a friend who gets horrible heartburn when she eats tomato sauce. That's never happened to me either.

            • jkuo
              jkuo commented
              Editing a comment
              I was tempted to plant them until I read a similar article. I've got too many family members with sensitive digestive tracts. I opted to stick with sweet potatoes as my digging vegetable.

            • GregMartin
              GregMartin commented
              Editing a comment
              My favorite name for them is fartichokes

              BTW, so far I haven't noticed anything from using them, but I don't ever eat a lot at a time.
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