X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • This made me laugh

    http://www.rareseeds.com/rare-fig-assortment-pre-orde/

    For $15 this pre-order gets you the following: " Includes 3 assorted small plants from 2 varieties" They indicate that the varieties are "rare" yet have no list of what you may receive in your order of assorted cuttings.
    Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

    “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

  • #2
    Makes me laugh too

    They must sell otherwise they wouldn't keep doing it.

    For people that are just looking for "figs", it's not a bad deal but there are many other places out there (like Wellspring) that sell inexpensive fig trees but for known varieties.

    Kevin (Eastern MA - Zone 5b/6a)

    Comment


    • #3
      It has 4.5 stars, ignorance is bliss!

      For $5.00 each it makes me wonder what they are. Those rare BT and Celeste are calling to me Kevin.
      Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

      “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

      Comment


      • #4
        One of the reviews says they are labeled with the variety name when you get them. A LSU fig, long yellow neck, and Brunswick were the 3 they received. Bass also has a similar thing called (mystery fig). People like surprises I guess.

        Comment


        • #5
          If your just starting your collection this could be a good and inexpensive way to go. At this point I'm not sure I want to risk getting duplicates of trees already have. I would rather get what I'm looking for, wait to be sure it is what it was labeled as, and move forward.
          Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

          “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

          Comment


          • #6
            I agree Scott. Good way to get started, but once you have a few varieties, escpecially common ones, it probably isn't worth it.

            Comment


            • #7
              I love that company though, they have a TON of heirloom varieties of pretty much everything. I get melons and herbs from them.
              Zone 7a in Virginia

              Comment


              • #8
                I agree Sarina, I am surprised at their lack of input on the topic knowing that they are so on the spot normally.
                Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

                Comment


                • #9
                  Plus these are definitely tissue culture plants. Very "Rare". Just Kidding. Probably from exactly the same place Wellspring gets their figs.
                  Fig & Blackberry Farmer in Sunol, CA.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    https://www.agristarts.com/
                    Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                    “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

                    Comment


                    • smatthew
                      smatthew commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Yup.

                  • #11
                    Aside from possibly slow fruiting, tissue culture is actually a good thing, isn't it? Disease free, high volume, cheap, etc.
                    Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Zaffiro, Moro de Caneva, Nerucciolo d'Elba, Bordissot Blanca Negra, Rubado

                    Comment


                    • smatthew
                      smatthew commented
                      Editing a comment
                      TC isn't necessarily disease free. If you start with diseased mother plants, you end up with diseased tissue culture plants. It is high volume, and it is cheap. Some fig varieties experience problems with Tissue Culture - it has the possibility of making the plant think it's young again which will delay fruiting.

                      They've seen the same effect (with different consequences) with Tissue Cultured Apple Rootstock. On some apple varieties, TC makes the plant act more juvenile.

                    • don_sanders
                      don_sanders commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Oh, that's too bad. I was thinking they could isolate just the healthy tissue from a diseased plant and leave the disease behind. Maybe that was from a sci-fi movie. Maybe someday.

                  • #12
                    The slow fruiting thing has a lot to do with the local conditions and how the owner handles the plants. Keeping them disease free is also environmental, you may infect them or have the fig mite that infects them from another tree.

                    Figs grow very slow in my area, the TC plants typically fruit in their second year, for many other people they report fruiting in the first year.
                    Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                    “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      I have 3 TC Italian honey and 3 TC Desert king. They were small 4-6 inches when I got them. In 6 months they were 5-6ft tall and all had figs on them, the desert kings all dropped since they are main crop, but the Italian honey held on and I still have a few ripening. Around 8 months from 6 inches to 6ft with ripe figs. Thats Hawaii time though.

                      Comment


                      • #14
                        Do you source yours locally Sid since it's so hard to import into Hawaii?
                        Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                        “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

                        Comment


                        • #15
                          Yes they were purchased at a BIAN (big island association of nurserymen) plant sale. I don't think it's that hard to import to Hawaii, there are thousands of plants at Walmart and home depot from the mainland.

                          It looks like the main requirement is they have to be planted in 100% coconut coir fiber(soil less media). Someone I know brought his entire nursery plant collection 1,500 different plants to Hawaii from California in a shipping container and said it was really easy.

                          Comment


                          • #16
                            Interesting. Usually most nurseries in the lower 48 will not ship to HI, and you read things here and there. What about leaving HI with plants?

                            By the way, I hope your expansion is going well.
                            Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                            “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X